Ponderables: Pick an era, any era


Haggis McBagpipe
#1
If you could choose the time in history you could have lived, what era would you choose?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#2
Bloody hell, Haggis that is such a great question! Quick, let me try to be the first in the rush to answer it.

Assuming I can't go into the future, which is where I'd like to go, I'd like to go back to the dawn of civilization, the earliest years... but only if I had a round ticket, I think.
 
American Voice
#3
A round ticket? Tickets are generally rectangular in shape, aren't they? Ah, I see: you are speculating that tickets issued in the primeval mists most likely had a circular shape. Or, perhaps, spherical. Now I know you need to go back in time to hunt for your lost marbles! Zo, how long have you been having zis dream?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#4
Yes, there has been considerable evidence to suggest that tickets of that era were round.

Speculation has it that the Round Ticket, which is what they called it at that time - 'unnnngh urk argh unn ack' - was, in fact, very instrumental in the eventual invention of the wheel and the donut.

It is interesting to note that prior to the invention of the wheel, ticket holders had rather long waits at depots.

One must not suppose the depots at the dawn of civilization to be anything like the modern stations we enjoy today. They lacked many of the modern amenities, Starbucks is a notable example of, as prehistoric man was wont to say, Amenities-We-Sure-Wish-We-Had - ''unnnngh urk argh unn ack'.

There is some speculation that the lack of Starbucks and other amenities explains the poor posture of prehistoric man, the prevailing view being: slumped stance = depressed prehistoric man. This makes perfect sense when one considers the hardships involved, whereas a prehistoric man had to wait for transportation that never came, with a ticket that didn't fit well in the wallet, and without so much as a decent cup of coffee.

Hope this helps.
 
LuShes
#5
hahahah Haggis you crack me up!!! lol

If I could pick an era to live in...I would have to say the 1700-1800s. Now granted I wouldnt live long since they didn't have any sort of antiobiotics and the common cold could potentially kill you. But I have found it a very interesting era.

Or I would either choose the egyptian age in like 500 BC? Something BC....But the egytpians have always been an interesting culture.
 
Andem
#6
I would like to live in the WWII times.. The technology advances at that time amaze me. I would definately have wanted to have something to do with that.
 
American Voice
#7
To have been a member of the generation immediately surviving the Black Death, I think.
 
Lisa
#8
What a good question! Well if it cannot be the future I would like to go back to the Elizabethan age (and of course to England). Euhm can i also be a Catholic? Because, well else i would be killed by Eliza and i would rather dislike that

Also, i would then like to be of some importance, aristocracy or something because if you were a woman (which actually is accurate for humanity up until the 1890's) you would be automatically be treated as inferior to men.

Yes, i have got some demands, byt hey they are needed for those times.
 
Diamond Sun
#9
I would love to go back to the days of the American Civil War (not actually during the war, but just those days) Where the ladies wore those gorgeous gowns everyday, and then men were real gentlemen. That sounds divine!
 
peapod
#10
Haggis you certainly come up with unusual topics. I would say I would choose the late 1800 to early 1900, but only if I can return with what I know now I would hook up with my relatives from Scotland who came over on the oatmeal boat the hector and make sure they were no where near halifax when the explosion happened. But than again if I did that I might not be here now.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Haggis you certainly come up with unusual topics. I would say I would choose the late 1800 to early 1900, but only if I can return with what I know now :D I would hook up with my relatives from Scotland who came over on the oatmeal boat the hector and make sure they were no where near halifax when the explosion happened. But than again if I did that I might not be here now.

Ahhh, the lovely dilemma. If you went back and warned them, you'd've never been born, and if you were never born you could not go back to warn them in which case you WOULD have been born... and so it goes...
 
researchok
#12
Actually, I'd like to go back (with a return ticket, of course), only one generation.

I'd like to have witnessed, for my self, the generation that went from horse and buggy, iceboxes, gas lamps, etc., to an era of cars, planes, electricty, computers, space shuttles and the internet.

A great regret of mine was not vodeo taping my grandparents reminiscences befor they passed.

If you have older relatives, I think it would make for a great family project.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#13
We share this regret, Research. I recall my impatience when my parents talked of old times, now I'd do anything to sit quietly and listen.

I'd like to - and this will sound insane, but if one is only visiting another time briefly, it is not so insane - live through a major hard time such as the Depression Era, or the bombing of London, or something like that.

I'd like to witness the human spirit as people struggle against overwhelming odds. We face few such challenges today, we are not challenged in such a profound way. I wonder if we're even up for it.

Yes, September 11th brought iwth it tales of courage, but the stories show that many of the people embraced the grief and horror and refused to let it go. In many cases, it paralyzed them instead of strengthening them.
 
researchok
#14
The paralysis you describe in your lasr paragraph, I think, is pretty universal, a nuanced Darwinism, I think.

I too, would have liked to have witnessed the bombing of London, etc.

I'd also like to have seen some of the horrors, from the seige of Leningrad to the camps in Europe, to Pol Pot and even Saddam.

There is much to learn from the misuse of our potential.
 
researchok
#15
You know Haggis, we ought to start a thread of our parents reminiscences, for example, how/where they met, etc., for starters.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

You know Haggis, we ought to start a thread of our parents reminiscences, for example, how/where they met, etc., for starters.

I like that idea, do you want to start it or should I?
 
researchok
#17
Haggis, I cede to your seniority!
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

Haggis, I cede to your seniority!

... in years or... oh my good god, how did I manage to get ahead of you in posting???
 
researchok
#19
Look at the bright side-- theres hope for us both.

Lots being done in the field of genetic defects.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#20
Please donate, help us find a cure for forum addiction. Be generous, this crippling disease affects millions, leaving families bereft. Carpal tunnel syndrome is only one of the many lethal side-effects, caffeine addiction is another... specifically addiction to organic Mexican coffee. Open your wallets, send in your money now. But wait. With each donation of $25 or more you will receive a set of Ginsu knives. Don't pick up that phone yet, there's more. If you act now, your ginsu knives will be authenticated by a signature from a Person Crippled By Forum Addiction. Call now, 1-800-555-1212. Help those who can't help themselves.
 
researchok
#21
I will NOT reply until you start a new thread.

Only then will discuss my addictions.

I WILL agree to appear on Oprah-- if the online community votes that way.
 
researchok
#22
I will be autographing my new book, "Haggis and Me-- Shared Hidden Anguish of Keyboard Abusers', Mon, Wed and Fri, while Haggis posts.

He will sign Tues, Thurs and Sat while I post.

Sundaym we'll arm wrestle for posting rights.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#23
Well I started a new thread, and there it sits, empty and forlorn, a derelict, a has-been, a nobody, a never-will-be, a wallflower, a sad and terrible waste. Verbs, nouns, adjectives, all gone to waste! Alas!
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

I will be autographing my new book, "Haggis and Me-- Shared Hidden Anguish of Keyboard Abusers', Mon, Wed and Fri, while Haggis posts.

He will sign Tues, Thurs and Sat while I post.

Sundaym we'll arm wrestle for posting rights.

I'm still trying to remember how to hold a pen. My fingers are on the 'keyboard' setting and I can't delete the setting to save my as.... um, fingers. So, the Tues, Thurs and Sat signings might be delayed.

Oprah just called, wants to stick her silly 'Oprah Thinks This Book is Groovy' sticker on our book. I said sure, but can you dance? She hasn't got back to me.
 
researchok
#25
Pen? Wat dat?

I was gonna bring my label maker.

Just tell O I'm a regular on the 'Happiness Journal'
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok


Just tell O I'm a regular on the 'Happiness Journal'

Is her picture on every single everlasting cover of it, too?
 
peapod
#27
You know you might be right Haggis about living in a hard time or living through some horrible ordeal. I have come to this conclusion because I work with seniors and there is no better source of actual history than those that went through it.
One of the seniors that I got to know very well was a tiny little man named Bill. He could have passed for one one those garden gomes. He was 4'9" and if he weighed 90 pounds I would have been surprised. As I got to know him I learned that Bill was a tail gunner in WW2. He saw alot of horror but the worst for him was seeing his friends and comrades die. Bill's plane crashed on a runway on a landing attempt and he broke his back and spent the next two years in a hospital.
Now bill would sit outside all day long, he loved everything nature. In fact some days he sat so still birds would actually land on him trying to get to their feeder. I never knew anyone that had so much love for nature. I believe that he had seen so much horror that he truly could appreciate everything else, and it brought him so much joy.
Bill died last year at the age of 90, I always wondered why he did not have any family, he never talked about it, just said he did not have any. At his funeral I learned that Bill had been a one of the home childern sent to canada from an orphanage in Britian. He was sent to Quebec to work as farm slave at the age of 14.

What I found so amazing in all of this was the fact that he volunteered to go as a tail gunner for the RAF, the very country that sent him off into a labor camp. There was not a bitter bone in his body and no one would have suspected the life he had. I think you call it character, I wonder if he would have had it if not for all the adversity he overcame.
I don't mean to be long winded here, but just let me say I love this place. I have looked at different boards to join but one won me over, there seems to be alot of intelligent people hanging here.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#28
Hey, peapod, first of all, welcome. You know, your username strikes a chord with me, I am an avid pea-in-a-pod consumer!

Your story is marvelous, you understand perfectly what I mean, the reasons why I'd like to go back to an era like that. I want to see first-hand some of that awesome courage and fortitude. Great story, Bill sounds fascinating. I admire the fact that you took the time to know that side of him. Few people seem to recognize the worth in old people.

Again, welcome!
 
researchok
#29
I just want the chance to meet the creature that came up with PICKLED BEETS.

As you can tell, I may be a bit overtired.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

I just want the chance to meet the creature that came up with PICKLED BEETS.

As you can tell, I may be a bit overtired.

Bet you dream about beets. Lots and lots and lots of beets. Beet soup, beet stew, beet lasagne, beet cheesecake.

Nah, don't thank me, it was a pleasure!
 

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