Nelson Mandela Was A 'Terrorist'


B00Mer
#1
**** Cheney Didn't Regret His Vote Against Freeing Nelson Mandela, Maintained He Was A 'Terrorist'

Cheney Maintained Mandela Was A 39Terrorist39 - YouTube



In 1986, Nelson Mandela -- the former president of South Africa who died Thursday at the age of 95 -- was serving the 23rd year of what would ultimately be a 27-year prison sentence. The Western world was finally acknowledging the true horrors of Apartheid, a system of racial segregation that denied basic rights to blacks -- including citizenship and the right to vote -- and brutally oppressed a generation of South Africans fighting for equality.

In the U.S. Congress, lawmakers were ready to show their opposition to the South African regime with the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act, a bill that called for tough sanctions and travel restrictions on the nation and its leaders, and for the repeal of apartheid laws and release of political prisoners like Mandela, then leader of the African National Congress (ANC).

The measure passed with bipartisan support, despite strong and largely Republican opposition. President Ronald Reagan was among those most opposed to the bill, and when he finally vetoed the measure over its support of the ANC, which he maintained was a "terrorist organization," it took another vote by Congress to override it. Among the Republicans who repeatedly voted against the measure was future Vice President **** Cheney, then a Republican congressman from Wyoming.

Cheney's staunch resistance to the Anti-Apartheid Act arose as an issue during his future campaigns on the presidential ticket, but the Wyoming Republican has never said he regretted voting the way he did. In fact, in 2000, he maintained that he'd made the right decision.
“The ANC was then viewed as a terrorist organization," Cheney said on ABC's "This Week." "I don't have any problems at all with the vote I cast 20 years ago.''

Cheney went on to call Mandela a "great man" who had "mellowed" in the decade after his release from prison.

In 2004, Democratic vice presidential candidate John Edwards tore into his counterpart's congressional voting record, calling out Cheney for his vote against freeing Mandela. Shortly after, Cheney historian John Nichols said that he'd spoken to Mandela about Cheney's record and worldview. Like many, Mandela was concerned:
Quote:

He’s very blunt about it he says one of the many reasons why he fears **** Cheney’s power in the United States, and Mandela does say, he understands that Cheney is effectively the President of the United States, he says, one of the many reasons that he fears **** Cheney’s power is that in the late 1980’s when even prominent Republicans like Jack Kemp and Newt Gingrich were acknowledging the crime of Apartheid, **** Cheney maintained the lie that the ANC was a terrorist organization and a fantasy that Nelson Mandela was a terrorist leader who deserved to be in jail. Frankly it begs very powerful question. If **** Cheney’s judgment was that bad in the late 1980’s, why would we believe that it’s gotten any better in the early 21st century?

A handful of sitting lawmakers also voted against freeing Mandela. GOP Reps. Joe Barton (Texas), Howard Coble (N.C.) and Hal Rogers (Ky.) opposed the Anti-Apartheid Act throughout the legislative process. Texas Rep. Ralph Hall, then a Democrat, voted against the bill, but did not vote on the veto override.

Source: **** Cheney Didn't Regret His Vote Against Freeing Nelson Mandela, Maintained He Was A 'Terrorist'
 
lone wolf
+4
#2
Big deal.... So was George Washington (according to the guy who'll hop on this one too)
 
Blackleaf
#3
Mandela was head of an organisation (UmKhonto we Sizwe, the terrorist wing of the ANC) which killed unborn babies, and some people believe he even conducted 1980s UmKhonto we Sizwe murders from his prison cell. Cheney was right to vote against his release. It's commonsense, really.

Not only did Mandela refuse to renounce violence, but even Amnesty refused to take his case stating“[the] movement recorded that it could not give the name of ‘Prisoner of Conscience’ to anyone associated with violence, even though as in ‘conventional warfare’ a degree of restraint may be exercised.”
 
Spade
#4

Christopher Hitchens on the ANC South African Apartheid History Desmond Tutu 1985 - YouTube

 
Cliffy
+1
#5
Wow! Dr. Strangelove thinks Mandela was a terrorist. I'm so impressed with his intellect! I suppose Dr. Strangelove was a freedom fighter?
 
petros
#6
Cheney was spot on.
 
CDNBear
+3
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Cheney was spot on.

I'm sure you cringed as you typed that, I know I would have.
 
Cliffy
+4
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Cheney was spot on.

Which spot is that? Certainly not the G spot.

Seems to me that the guy responsible for the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis has little credibility in this matter.
 
B00Mer
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Which spot is that? Certainly not the G spot.

Seems to me that the guy responsible for the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis has little credibility in this matter.



Yeah, seems to me Cheney has more blood on his hands..
 
Sal
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post



Yeah, seems to me Cheney has more blood on his hands..

you are right, so do a lot of them that condemn him, in the end what people think of him is unimportant anyway...as it is with us. Hardly a blip on the screen of life. He did what he did, he was who he was... nothing is black and white.
 
WLDB
+2
#11
Kind of reminds me of that Snowden quote about it having been an honour to be called a traitor by **** Cheney. Being on his side on almost anything just doesnt feel quite right.
 
damngrumpy
+3
#12
Some call him a terrorist other a freedom fighter. I prefer the latter he was fighting
an unjust regime and the world stood by with silly little embargoes and sanctions
at the same time riches were pouring out of the country oh excuse me exports.
Yes they did work in the end but arming the ANC would have helped. After all we
arm the real terror groups fighting against Syria. Now before we get all up in the
air about Syria, remember its a secular society in which Muslims, Christians and
even a handful Jews get along. Good God we can't have that. From what I hear
the Christians in Syria support the Regime.
As for South Africa Mandela proved he was a freedom fighter instead of going
down the road of hardcore socialism he chose the west and unity of his country.
When he died he became a Statesman of the World and he probably did more for
mankind in recent years than all the other Nobel recipients put together. Of course
many GOP members would vote not to free him they only believe in Democracy
when its convenient. Then again there are many in the GOP who did not support
keeping him in prison.
 
Kreskin
+6
#13  Top Rated Post
All the US founding fathers were terrorists too. Now they are ranked up there with God in some expensive households.
 
Goober
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Cheney was spot on.

Why?
 
Spade
+3
#15
Chenet took a shotgun approach to diplomacy.
 
Goober
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Chenet took a shotgun approach to diplomacy.

Only with his hunting buddies.
 
taxslave
+2
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Big deal.... So was George Washington (according to the guy who'll hop on this one too)

RIght on the money.
 
JLM
+3
#18
If it is true, which is questionable, it just means that Mandela is truly a great man due to the width of the gulf he's managed to cross. He's had more adversity to conquer than most.

Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Mandela was head of an organisation (UmKhonto we Sizwe, the terrorist wing of the ANC) which killed unborn babies, and some people believe he even conducted 1980s UmKhonto we Sizwe murders from his prison cell. Cheney was right to vote against his release. It's commonsense, really.

Not only did Mandela refuse to renounce violence, but even Amnesty refused to take his case stating“[the] movement recorded that it could not give the name of ‘Prisoner of Conscience’ to anyone associated with violence, even though as in ‘conventional warfare’ a degree of restraint may be exercised.”


A little lesson here for you Blackleaf, the more a person with low credibility expounds on debasing a person the better the person appears. To put it so even you can understand it, very few are "buying" your sh*t. Actually very few are even paying attention to it!
 
CDNBear
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

All the US founding fathers were terrorists too.

Erroneously, and only according to the British.
 
Goober
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Erroneously, and only according to the British.

200 plus years and they still cannot understand how a bunch of merchants, farm boys, clerks and such utterly destroyed the Brit Military Machine.
 
JLM
#21
It's just struck me that Nelson Mandela has done more for humanity than anyone else for 150 years, since Abraham Lincoln!
 
Dexter Sinister
+3
#22
People stick the terrorist label on those who use violence in ways or for causes they don't approve of.
 
JLM
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter SinisterView Post

People stick the terrorist label on those who use violence in ways or for causes they don't approve of.


Yep, sometimes it's just a synonym for "having balls". -
 
petros
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Yep, sometimes it's just a synonym for "having balls". -

How has life improved in SA?
 
JLM
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

How has life improved in SA?


More blacks gaining equality!
 
WLDB
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

It's just struck me that Nelson Mandela has done more for humanity than anyone else for 150 years, since Abraham Lincoln!

I'd say he's up there but not at the top. Gandhi was doing more or less the same thing decades before Mandela.

The folks who came up with the Polio vaccine and penicillin were far more helpful to people around the world than Mandela was. They have saved millions of lives around the world.
 
JLM
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

I'd say he's up there but not at the top. Gandhi was doing more or less the same thing decades before Mandela.

The folks who came up with the Polio vaccine and penicillin were far more helpful to people around the world than Mandela was. They have saved millions of lives around the world.


That's true, Frederick Banting too.
 
WLDB
+2
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter SinisterView Post

People stick the terrorist label on those who use violence in ways or for causes they don't approve of.

Indeed. Personally I don't see any problem with using violence to fight apartheid if peaceful means aren't working.
 
petros
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

More blacks gaining equality!

The question was " how has life improved in SA?"

Now everyone is equally broke?

Are you happy with your vote even though it's something you've always had?
 
Sal
+1
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

The question was " how has life improved in SA?"

Now everyone is equally broke?

Are you happy with your vote even though it's something you've always had?

things take time to improve...the same could be said about slavery in the US if one looks at ghetto/gang life today....

it's all relative, freedom is freedom to choose

why would you decide for others what is best for them, perhaps poverty and freedom are better than the security of living on a leash, perhaps for you personally it would not be... it is a philosophical dilemma and not one with an easy answer...our own native communities have similar issues

viewing something in black and white seldom reveals truth

although it does make people comfortable
 
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