Wikipedia joins web blackout in Sopa protest


mentalfloss
#1
Wikipedia joins web blackout in Sopa protest

Wikipedia plans to take its English-language site offline on Wednesday as part of protests against proposed anti-piracy laws in the US.

The user-generated news site Reddit and the blog Boing Boing have also said they will take part in the "blackout". The sites' webmasters are opposed to the Stop Online Piracy Act (Sopa) and Protect Intellectual Property Act (Pipa) being debated by Congress.

However, Twitter has declined to take part in the shutdown.

Wikipedia's founder, Jimmy Wales, told the BBC: "Proponents of Sopa have characterised the opposition as being people who want to enable piracy or defend piracy. "But that's not really the point. The point is the bill is so over broad and so badly written that it's going to impact all kinds of things that, you know, don't have anything to do with stopping piracy."

Sopa's supporters in the House of Representatives say the legislation is designed to stop revenue flowing to "rogue websites". A similar law, Pipa, is making its way through the US Senate.

On Saturday the White House issued a statement that appeared to side with critics of the Acts.
Continue reading the main story (external - login to view)

Sopa and Pipa explained

The US bills are designed to block access to sites containing unauthorised copryight material.

Content owners and the US government would be given the power to request court orders to shut down sites associated with piracy.

Advertisers, payment processors and internet service providers would be forbidden from doing business with infringers based overseas.

Sopa also requires search engines to remove foreign infringing sites from their results, a provision absent in Pipa.

  • Full explanation on Sopa and Pipa (external - login to view)

It said: "While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response, we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global internet."

Despite the hint of a presidential veto, Wikipedia said that the English site's administrators had decided to stage its first ever public protest (external - login to view) because the bills "would be devastating to the free and open web".

It added: "We don't think Sopa is going away, and Pipa is still quite active. Moreover, Sopa and Pipa are just indicators of a much broader problem. All around the world, we're seeing the development of legislation intended to fight online piracy, and regulate the internet in other ways, that hurt online freedoms."

However, when asked whether Twitter would join the blackout, its chief executive, Dick Costolo, tweeted (external - login to view): "Closing a global business in reaction to single-issue national politics is foolish."

In a Twitter conversation with Wikipedia's founder Jimmy Wales, Mr Costolo later clarified that his comment was not meant to be read as a "value judgement" about other organisations involvement in the action.

The anti-piracy legislation still has high profile supporters including News Corporation's chairman, Rupert Murdoch. Over the weekend he tweeted (external - login to view): "So Obama has thrown in his lot with Silicon Valley paymasters who threaten all software creators with piracy, plain thievery."

He later added: "Seems like universal anger with POTUS [President of the United States] from all sorts of normal supporters... Whole entertainment industry employs 2.2 million [on] average salary $65,000. Good jobs and expanding foreign earnings. Made in America, too!"

Sites taking part in the shutdown plan to go offline for 24 hours from midnight Eastern Standard Time (05:00 GMT) on Wednesday.

BBC News - Wikipedia joins web blackout in Sopa protest (external - login to view)
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#2
Quote:

NEW YORK - Wikipedia will shut down for 24 hours Wednesday to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act, founder Jimmy Wales announced on Monday.
In doing so, Wikipedia joins a long list of web companies such as Reddit and Mozilla that are taking similar measures against the proposed legislation.
Wales used his Twitter account to spread the news, writing “Student warning! Do your homework early. Wikipedia protesting bad law on Wednesday! #sopa“
In place of Wikipedia, users will see instructions for how to reach local members of Congress, which Wales hope “will melt phone systems in Washington.”
He also noted that comScore estimates the English Wikipedia’s web traffic at 25 million daily visitors worldwide.

I completely agree with this move, but it is going to kill some of the posters here.
 
mentalfloss
#3
*cough*
 
WLDB
+2
#4
Move their sites out of the US. Thats what businesses do when laws get in the way.
 
DurkaDurka
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

Move their sites out of the US. Thats what businesses do when laws get in the way.

Well, that's not going to help in this case. What this law proposes, is the altering of DNS records which would prevent anyone from accessing said site.
 
WLDB
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurkaView Post

Well, that's not going to help in this case. What this law proposes, is the altering of DNS records which would prevent anyone from accessing said site.

There's something wrong with that. No country should be able to have that kind of power over others.
 
DurkaDurka
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

There's something wrong with that. No country should be able to have that kind of power over others.

Exactly, hence the uproar. You start fiddling with underlying structures of the Net, you're opening a can of worms. It's the sort of behaviour you come to expect from China.
 
mentalfloss
#8
Google to state anti-SOPA stance on home page

Google said Tuesday that it will post a statement on its Web site voicing its opposition to the Stop Online Piracy Act, joining a drive that will see Reddit, Wikipedia, and Boing Boing take their Web sites dark for a period of time on Jan. 18. Google’s actions will not be as dramatic as others — Reddit and Boing Boing will take their sites down for 12 hours starting at 8 a.m., while Wikipedia will black out its English content for 24 hours on Wednesday — but the company’s decision to use its U.S. home page means that its arguments regarding SOPA will reach a huge audience.

In a statement, Google’s news team said, “Like many businesses, entrepreneurs and web users, we oppose these bills because there are smart, targeted ways to shut down foreign rogue websites without asking American companies to censor the Internet. So tomorrow we will be joining many other tech companies to highlight this issue on our US home page.”

Other sites voicing their support (external - login to view) for the Internet’s “strike” over the proposed piracy bills include MoveOn.org, the Cheezburger Network, Mozilla and Wordpress.

Lobbying against the bill has been furious, and on Tuesday, NetCoalition — which counts Google, Yahoo, Amazon, eBay and Wikipedia among its users — started a national radio and print (external - login to view) advertising campaign against SOPA and its Senate counterpart, the Protect IP Act, focusing on the argument that the restrictions the bills place on Internet companies to police infringing material on their sites stifles innovation.

Jobs are also a main talking point for those lobbying the other side of the issue such as the Recording Industry Association of America, the Motion Picture Association of America and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who say that online piracy sites that sell counterfeit goods or steal copyrighted material hurt American companies. Proponents of the measure say that the bills are written to narrowly target foreign Web sites, and will not — as critics say — put the burden of policing these sites onto American companies such as Google or American Internet service providers.

“Every day, consumers are duped, jobs are stolen, and businesses are crippled due to foreign rogue websites. That is why the Chamber strongly supports both the PROTECT IP Act in the Senate and the Stop Online Piracy Act in the House — both are narrowly tailored bills designed to target the worst of the worst offenders,” said David Hirschmann, President and CEO of the Global Intellectual Property Center at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Google to state anti-SOPA stance on home page - The Washington Post (external - login to view)
 
spaminator
#9
wasn't the owner/creator accused of rape?
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminatorView Post

wasn't the owner/creator accused of rape?

You are confusing wikipedia with wikileaks. 2 different wikis.
 
DurkaDurka
+1
#11
These media companies are their own worst enemy with their heavy handed tactics.


Reeling MPAA declares DNS filtering "off the table"

By Timothy B. Lee | Published about 4 hours ago
Reeling from a broad Internet backlash, the Motion Picture Associaton of America has conceded that DNS filtering will not be included in the anti-piracy bills now making their way through Congress.

"DNS filtering is really off the table," said Paul Brigner, the MPAA's tech policy chief, on Tuesday. His remarks came during a debate on SOPA at the State of the Net conference in Washington DC. The event was sponsored by the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee.

"The future of our industry relies on the Internet," Brigner said, noting that movie studios were increasingly selling their products to consumers via the Internet.

Reeling MPAA declares DNS filtering "off the table" (external - login to view)
 
spaminator
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

You are confusing wikipedia with wikileaks. 2 different wikis.

thanks for the info. i'm going to go take a wikipee/wikileak. be back soon.
Last edited by spaminator; Jan 17th, 2012 at 03:14 PM..
 
Niflmir
#13
I want to see what happens with the whole MegaUpload vs. Universal lawsuit.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#14
Seeing Mentalfloss posted the same thread after me, perhaps a merge is in order.
 
DurkaDurka
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by NiflmirView Post

I want to see what happens with the whole MegaUpload vs. Universal lawsuit.

Well, normally a company like MegaUpload would be covered by the safe harbor provisions of the DMCA, provided they delete infringing files upon request by studio/developer etc... not sure if that would apply here though.
 
eh1eh
+1
#16
The acronym SOPA stands for, 'Screw the 99% for the 1% some more, lol, too bad for your right America'. Or something like that.
 
Mowich
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

Seeing Mentalfloss posted the same thread after me, perhaps a merge is in order.

Was going to post on this subject too, RCS..........though I was going to use SOPA in the title so that Canadians would know just what it will mean to the net should this legislation pass.

Good article on the subject here:

Michael Geist: Black Wednesday: In Protest of SOPA, Darken the Web (external - login to view)


Am interested in knowing what Andem thinks of this.
 
earth_as_one
#18
I'm going to boycott everything online tomorrow except work related...
 
ironsides
#19
Last Action:
Dec 16, 2011: House Committee on the Judiciary: Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held.
H.R. 3261: Stop Online Piracy Act (GovTrack.us)



It is on hold for now. My guess is till after the elections if at all.
 
Kreskin
#20
Isn't Obama going to veto it if they pass it?
 
ironsides
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

Isn't Obama going to veto it if they pass it?

Not sure what Obama will do, guess the bill will fail, wonder how they can re-write it and make everyone happy..

(Reuters) - U.S. legislation aimed at curbing online piracy, which had appeared to be on a fast track for approval by Congress, appears likely to be scaled back or jettisoned entirely in the wake of critical comments over the weekend from the White House, people familiar with the matter said.
The legislation, known as SOPA in the House of Representatives and PIPA in the Senate, has been a major priority for entertainment companies, publishers, pharmaceutical firms and many industry groups, who say it is critical to curbing online piracy that costs them billions of dollars a year.
The legislation is designed to shut down access to overseas websites that traffic in stolen content or counterfeit goods.
Internet companies have furiously opposed the legislation and have ramped up their lobbying efforts in recent months, arguing the legislation would undermine innovation and free speech rights and compromise the functioning of the Internet.
Some Internet advocates have called for a boycott of any companies that support the legislation, and several popular websites, including community-edited encyclopedia Wikipedia and the social media site Reddit, have vowed to black out their sites this Wednesday in protest.
With public sentiment on the bill shifting in recent weeks and an implicit veto threat now emerging from the White House, Congressional staffers are resigning themselves to writing replacement language or possibly entirely new bills.

news.yahoo.com/u-online-pirac...222324774.html (external - login to view)
Last edited by ironsides; Jan 18th, 2012 at 02:45 AM..
 
mentalfloss
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1ehView Post

The acronym SOPA stands for, 'Screw the 99% for the 1% some more, lol, too bad for your right America'. Or something like that.

It's not just the American 99% that would be screwed over..

Canada would feel effect of proposed Stop Online Piracy Act

Some of the best-known sites on the internet, including Wikipedia, are going offline today in a "Dark Wednesday" protest against legislation before the U.S. Congress intended to curb copyright infringement that critics say will limit the scope of the web and adversely affect legitimate websites.

Among those joining the protest are two popular Canadian sites: Tucows (external - login to view), a Toronto-based site that hosts free software for download, and the blog (external - login to view) of University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist, an oft-cited expert on copyright issues.

Although SOPA and PIPA are intended to target "rogue" websites, for Canadians, the concern is that if the laws are passed, there might be collateral damage that harms legitimate sites.

Geist outlined some of the ways the proposed laws could affect Canadians in a Jan. 17 blog post (external - login to view):

In the eyes of U.S. law, websites with domain names ending in .com, .net and .org are treated as American domestic domain names, regardless of where their owners are based, he wrote.

SOPA ignores the fact that IP addresses are assigned by regional, not national, entities. The American Registry for Internet Numbers allocates IP addresses for Canada (both for individual customers and governments) and 20 Caribbean nations, as well as the U.S. However, under SOPA, the IP addresses it allocates would be considered "domestic," i.e., U.S., IP addresses.

SOPA effectively grants the U.S. jurisdiction over some foreign websites, said Geist.

"The long arm of U.S. law reaches into Canada using SOPA," he said.

Intellectual property protection as U.S. foreign policy


If SOPA becomes law, Geist expects the U.S. to try to export its rules to Canada and other countries.

He notes that the Canadian government's proposed copyright modernization act, Bill C-11, was modelled on a similar U.S. law backed by the same industries pushing SOPA. The bill has been criticized for its provisions to prohibit the recording and copying of content protected by digital locks, which many say are too restrictive and prevent even the lawful use of copyrighted material.

U.S. diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks reveal (external - login to view) that Bill C-11 came about at least in part as a response to U.S. pressure on Canada to tighten its copyright laws.

Spurgeon said SOCAN hopes Bill C-11 "will also address the issues of online piracy, but it remains to be seen if the proposed law will achieve this purpose."

Under SOPA, intellectual property protection will become "a significant component of U.S. foreign policy," Geist writes.

If a website owner outside the U.S. wants to challenge a U.S. court order issued under SOPA, "the owner must first consent to the jurisdiction of the U.S. courts."

Wikipedia shuts down to protest U.S. online piracy laws - Canada - CBC News
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#23


I have shut both of my sites down for the day in protest

If anyone wants to sign the protest or send an email you can do so here: americancensorship.org/ (external - login to view)
.
 
spaminator
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post



I have shut both of my sites down for the day in protest

If anyone wants to sign the protest or send an email you can do so here: Stop American Censorship — a campaign from Fight for the Future (external - login to view)
.

wouldn't pipa and sopa help prevent your book(s) from being illegally copied? isn't that what you and your fellow authors want?
 
DurkaDurka
+3
#25  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminatorView Post

wouldn't pipa and sopa help prevent your book(s) from being illegally copied? isn't that what you and your fellow authors want?

The US already has some of the stiffest copyright laws in the land, so authors, creators etc are already protected and have legal recourse if needed. This law basically allows Content Creators to have websites shutdown without due process, no company should have that right.
 
taxslave
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurkaView Post

The US already has some of the stiffest copyright laws in the land, so authors, creators etc are already protected and have legal recourse if needed. This law basically allows Content Creators to have websites shutdown without due process, no company should have that right.

Thanks. i was kind of wondering why the people this law should help would be against it.
 
eh1eh
#27
Could be anybody. America is going broke so they're going to run roughshod against the world, as usual.

Life will suck if they censor the internet (external - login to view)
 
L Gilbert
#28
hehe Wife an I just signed about 10 petitions against Pipa and Sopa. basically, if someone mumbles about infringments at a site, it'll be shut down indefinitely. Even more basically, it'll be a witch hunt. And it's just more crony capitalism excuses for a few to make profits over many while it impinges on freedom. There are a few ways of keeping people from plagiarism and other things.
I think people will just move their internet gear out of the US.
 
gopher
+1
#29
The government needs to get out of the Internet. Censorship is Un-American.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminatorView Post

wouldn't pipa and sopa help prevent your book(s) from being illegally copied? isn't that what you and your fellow authors want?

What people don't get in their furor of greediness is that the piracy issue at the individual level is minimal to the benefits of things like Youtube or book and music sharing.

Artists get it, it's the corporations that don't.

When you upload a portion of music or even a clip from a movie to Youtube or some other site you are giving them free advertising.

Why do you think Bono and Madonna were giving away their music? It's because the benefits outweigh the loss. Checked out tickets for a concert lately?

The real issue of piracy isn't the guy sharing music or movies, it's the mass production that is done in China and India.

As far as protecting my copyright. When I get back in the Spring I am going to give away a bunch more free e-books and do another drawing.

By sharing e-versions of my book I offer pirates the ability to copy the file and share it with others.

Am I worried?

No.

The more people who read my novel and like it the more word of mouth I get for sales.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jazu4se4kS (external - login to view)
Last edited by Retired_Can_Soldier; Jan 19th, 2012 at 01:40 AM..
 

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