"Coward of the Titanic" is cleared a century on


Blackleaf
#1
'Coward of the Titanic' is cleared a century on

2nd May 2007

For almost a century, he has been vilified for his "selfish" behaviour as the Titanic sank beneath the waves.

Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon escaped with his wife and her secretary in a lifeboat which could have held 28 more passengers.

He was also accused of bribing the crew not to return to the wreck site to pick up survivors crying out in the icy water.



Witness: Mabel Francatelli, centre, with the Duff Gordons




But now evidence has emerged which sheds light on the Old Etonian's actions - and paints him as a hero of the disaster.

A letter written by his wife's secretary, Mabel Francatelli, describes the harrowing events of April 14 and 15, 1912.

Miss Francatelli tells her family how she and her mistress clung to Sir Cosmo, refusing to climb into a lifeboat without him - suggesting that he was forced to take a seat to save their lives.

And, she says, there were no other women on deck to fill up the boat, so a ship's officer was happy to let Sir Cosmo join them.

A copy of the letter has been put up for sale at Christie's in London by her nephew, along with the cork-filled lifejacket she wore that evening. The lot is expected to fetch up to 80,000.

Sir Cosmo was cleared of any wrongdoing by the British Board of Trade inquiry, but his reputation was ruined, and the stigma remained until his death in 1931.

Miss Francatelli, then 30, of Streatham, South London, recorded the events in gripping detail, from a hotel in New York five days after the disaster.

"We walked to the end of the boat and they were letting down the last lifeboat on our side and calling for anymore (sic) women, and pulled at us, but we clung on to Sir Cosmo and said we would not go without him, so they lowered the boat," she wrote.





"Presently there was a little boat at the end, what they called the emergency boat, the officers standing there told some stokers to man the boat and no other women were there, so Sir Cosmo asked if we could get in, and we said we would if he could come.

"The dear officers let us, and we dropped into this boat, then they let it down to the water."

The group were later picked up by the Carpathia. Her words back up Sir Cosmo's testimony to the inquiry into the sinking.

He claimed that First Officer William Murdoch had practically invited the party to get into that particular boat.

This is not the first time Miss Francatelli has endorsed his version of events.

Sir Cosmo was accused of paying the crew of the lifeboat 5 each to row away from the ship, for fear they might be swamped by the waves or survivors.

But in her affidavit to Lord Mersey's inquiry, a copy of which is also up for sale at the auction, she said he paid the men as an act of charity, as they had lost all their kit. She also denied hearing a discussion about returning to help.


Exonerated: Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon




In the letter to her family, she describes the confusion and terror of those in the lifeboat.

"We rowed away from the ship, which was sinking fast, so to get away from swell or sucksion (sic).

"I . . . saw all the lights go out, and the very last of her, then the terrible explosion of rumbling, followed by the cries and screams of the hundreds in the water."

Her employer, Lady Duff-Gordon, was far better known in society than her privileged husband.
She was not only the sister of Elinor Glynn, the romantic novelist, but also behind the successful fashion label Lucile.

Lady Duff-Gordon's actions on the night of the sinking have also been criticised.

As the liner disappeared beneath the waves, she is said to have remarked to her secretary: "There is your beautiful nightdress gone."

But Miss Francatelli writes to her family that newspaper reports about Lady Duff-Gordon were "quite untrue, for she has not seen one reporter, her lawyer strictly forbidden it, so everything about her is a concocted tale".

The secretary later married hotelier Max Haering and died in London in 1967.

Christie's specialist Charles Miller said:

"After Bruce Ismay's shameless saving of his own life, the Duff-Gordon incident ranked second in the catalogue of Titanic controversies and Miss Francatelli was the prime witness to a scene which would be revisited again and again in the many books which have investigated the Titanic's loss during the past 95 years."

dailymail.co.uk
 
EagleSmack
#2
The British Govt. sank the Titanic. Steel is harder than ice and it would be the first time in history that ice ripped a ship in half.
 
RomSpaceKnight
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

The British Govt. sank the Titanic. Steel is harder than ice and it would be the first time in history that ice ripped a ship in half.

It was a cast iron I believe not a true steel. Ever hit a piece of cast iron with a sledgehammer?
 
EagleSmack
#4
Ever throw a piece of ice against cast iron? It shatters. The British Govt and most likely the Zionist sunk the Titanic.

Actually hitting cast iron with a sledge hammer is a big hobby of mine. I belong to a Sledge Hammer vs Cast Iron Club here.
 
thomaska
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Ever throw a piece of ice against cast iron? It shatters. The British Govt and most likely the Zionist sunk the Titanic.

Actually hitting cast iron with a sledge hammer is a big hobby of mine. I belong to a Sledge Hammer vs Cast Iron Club here.

Gonna run with this one.

I actually think that Queen Elizabeth was on the Titanic planting the explosive charges herself.

As Blackleaf like to remind us daily, the queen is over 200 years old(most likely due to vampiric practices, like Vlad Tepes <---former boyfriend).

Absolutely heartbroken that Leonardo DiCaprio chose Kate Winslet(another vampire, maybe?) over her, she sank the Titanic using thermate(mite, whatever) limpet mines.

These remainder of these mines were what were used to destroy the WTC, of course. Not sure how they got to New York a few decades later, but maybe one of you can figure it out.
 
#juan
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Ever throw a piece of ice against cast iron? It shatters. The British Govt and most likely the Zionist sunk the Titanic.

Actually hitting cast iron with a sledge hammer is a big hobby of mine. I belong to a Sledge Hammer vs Cast Iron Club here.

It all depends on the circumstances. I've seen steel cut in a machine shop by a stream of water. It all comes down to pressure per unit area. If you have enough pressure, steel can be cut by ordinary water like it was butter.

www.nlbcorp.com/cold-cutting-water-jets.html (external - login to view)

And you don't need the abrasive. 16 gauge metal can be cut by the water alone.
 
EagleSmack
#7
Interesting Juan. So the British used a high pressure, high speed iceberg or stream of icebergs below the water line of the ill fated ship.

You may have something there because a big lumbering piece of ice would never cut cast iron.
 
#juan
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Interesting Juan. So the British used a high pressure, high speed iceberg or stream of icebergs below the water line of the ill fated ship.

You may have something there because a big lumbering piece of ice would never cut cast iron.

Come on Eagle

The iceberg was standing still. The Titanic was was doing 24 knots. The iceberg didn't cut so much as tear a gash in the Titanic's hull because of the extreme pressure. Something had to give and it was the Titanic's hull that gave.
 
Phil B
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Interesting Juan. So the British used a high pressure, high speed iceberg or stream of icebergs below the water line of the ill fated ship.

You may have something there because a big lumbering piece of ice would never cut cast iron.

Actually you are quite incorrect in your assumptions.

The British Government actually put row upon row of matches on the front of all ships running through potential Iceberg populated areas and coated all of the Ice bergs in the world with mild grit sandpaper.
Obviously a collision between one of the ships and an Iceberg would result in all the matches being lit and therefore, melting the said Iceberg as the ship carried gamely on its original course.

Unfortunately the specifications did not show the difference between safety and non-safety matches
 
EagleSmack
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Come on Eagle

The iceberg was standing still. The Titanic was was doing 24 knots. The iceberg didn't cut so much as tear a gash in the Titanic's hull because of the extreme pressure. Something had to give and it was the Titanic's hull that gave.

When they discovered the Titanic in the 80's she was ripped in half. There is no way that an iceberg could cut a ship in two.


The British Govt. along with the Zionists sank the Titanic.
 
EagleSmack
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Phil BView Post

Actually you are quite incorrect in your assumptions.

The British Government actually put row upon row of matches on the front of all ships running through potential Iceberg populated areas and coated all of the Ice bergs in the world with mild grit sandpaper.
Obviously a collision between one of the ships and an Iceberg would result in all the matches being lit and therefore, melting the said Iceberg as the ship carried gamely on its original course.

Unfortunately the specifications did not show the difference between safety and non-safety matches

I like this one as well. All I am saying is that the original story of an iceberg bumping into the Titanic and popping rivets causing the ship to sink is a total lie and cover up.
 
thomaska
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

I like this one as well. All I am saying is that the original story of an iceberg bumping into the Titanic and popping rivets causing the ship to sink is a total lie and cover up.

Michael Moore should be releasing a video on this subject anyday now.
 
DurkaDurka
#13
Michael moore is too damn fat to fit into a mini sub and visit the titanic.
 
#juan
#14
www.webtitanic.net/frameice.html (external - login to view)

Last edited by #juan; May 10th, 2007 at 03:46 PM..
 
EagleSmack
#15
Darn the British sure sunk a lot of ships and blamed them on icebergs. What a conspiracy!

Strange how the Titanic was the last ship sunk by an "Ice Berg". Suuuuuuuuuuure.
 
#juan
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Darn the British sure sunk a lot of ships and blamed them on icebergs. What a conspiracy!

Strange how the Titanic was the last ship sunk by an "Ice Berg". Suuuuuuuuuuure.

Hey. The Americans too.....http://tinyurl.com/2lsfrv.......
 
missile
#17
The bergs were the first prototype of the German Uboats and known as Eisbergs.
 
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