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A secret spy chamber that was built by the mother of Ivan the Terrible has been found under a Moscow street.

Archaeologists said the room was originally constructed beneath a 1.5 mile wall designed to protect Russians from Tatar and Polish raids during the 16th Century.

The vaulted wall is believed to have created an acoustic effect that allowed Russians to easily hear the enemy on the other side.

Archaeologists unearth 16th Century secret spy chamber which Ivan the Terrible's mother built under a street in Moscow


The chamber was built under a 1.5-mile wall used to keep out invaders

The wall's vaulted design meant Russians in the room could hear the enemy

Around 150 artefacts dating from between the 16th to 19th Century were found


By Joe Sheppard For Mailonline
2 April 2017

A secret spy chamber that was built by the mother of Ivan the Terrible has been found under a Moscow street.

Archaeologists said the room was originally constructed beneath a 1.5 mile wall designed to protect Russians from Tatar and Polish raids during the 16th Century.

The vaulted wall is believed to have created an acoustic effect that allowed Russians to easily hear the enemy on the other side.


Russian archaeologists have unearthed a spy chamber in Moscow


The chamber was discovered by builders doing construction work in the centre of the city


The room was built by Elena Glinskaya, the mother of Ivan the Terrible, pictured

The room was discovered by builders doing construction work in the centre of the city.

Inside archaeologists found some 150 artefacts dating from the 16th to 19th Century.

It is believed the chamber was last used as a spy room in the 17th Century during conflict with the Poles. During times of peace it was used to store food.

Leonid Kondrashev, Moscow's chief archaeologist, told RT (external - login to view) the room was built 'by Elena Glinskaya, the mother of Ivan the Terrible, who led Russia in the 1530s'.


Experts will decide whether the chamber should be opened to the public or preserved as it is


The vaulted wall is believed to have created an acoustic effect that allowed Russians to easily hear the enemy on the other side


Inside archaeologists found some 150 artifacts dating from the 16th to 19th Century

Another archaeologist who worked on the site told Interfax news agency: 'The majority of the artefacts are 18-19th century ceramics: fragments of pots, bowls. There is even a very well preserved ceramic cup.

'A dozen copper coins, lead trade sealing marks, iron knives, nails were also found.'

Experts will decide whether the chamber should be opened to the public or preserved as it is.

Read more: Archaeologists unearth 16th Century spy chamber in Moscow | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; 3 weeks ago at 06:58 AM..