Pocahontas statue 'relisted' to mark 400 years since death


Blackleaf
#1
A statue of Pocahontas has had its protected status "relisted" to mark 400 years since her death in England.

The life-size bronze effigy of the Native American stands in Gravesend, Kent, where she died on her journey home to Virginia in 1617.

Historic England has renewed its Grade II listed status and updated details of her life and role in Transatlantic history in its heritage list.

Pocahontas statue 'relisted' to mark 400 years since death


BBC News
16 March 2017


The life-size bronze effigy of the Native American stands in Gravesend, Kent

A statue of Pocahontas has had its protected status "relisted" to mark 400 years since her death in England.

The life-size bronze effigy of the Native American stands in Gravesend, Kent, where she died on her journey home to Virginia in 1617.

Historic England has renewed its Grade II listed status and updated details of her life and role in Transatlantic history in its heritage list.

A new Grade II listed status has also been given to a monument in London.


Pocahontas converted to Christianity and married the colonist John Rolfe

The Virginia Quay First Settlers Monument, across the River Thames from the O2 Arena (the Millennium Dome) in Blackwall, remembers the men, women and children who left the quayside for North America in December 1606.

The adventurers founded Jamestown, the first English colony in Virginia, in April 1607, which was captained by John Smith.

The statue of Pocahontas is a copy of a sculpture in Jamestown, Virginia, that was donated to the UK in 1958 by the state's then governor.

It was first listed in 1975.


The Virginia Quay First Settlers Monument remembers the men, women and children who left the quayside for North America in December 1606


Pocahontas is believed to be buried under St George's Church

Debbie Mays, head of listing at Historic England, said: "Pocahontas is remembered for her forging of ties between two very different cultures.

"These monuments are physical reminders of her story, those of the English setting sail to the New World, and our shared colonial past and we are pleased to mark their importance on the National Heritage List for England (external - login to view)."

Pocahontas: a fact file

Pocahontas was the daughter of Chief Powhatan, the leader of a tribe of Native Americans

Legend has it that after Captain Smith was captured by the tribe she negotiated his release, earning a reputation as a peacemaker

After Smith returned to England, she was captured and spent a year in the English encampment

There she converted to Christianity and married the colonist John Rolfe, adopting the name Rebecca Rolfe


She travelled more than 3,000 miles with her husband to England in 1616

During her time in England she was received by the court of King James I


She died in March 1617 at the beginning of the return leg to Virginia

Pocahontas was buried in the chancel of St George's Church, Gravesend, on 21 March 1617


Her remains are thought to be beneath the existing church, after the original was destroyed by fire in 1727


Pocahontas statue 'relisted' to mark 400 years since death - BBC News (external - login to view)
Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 16th, 2017 at 05:46 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
The Virginia Quay First Settlers Monument remembers the men, women and children who left the quayside for North America in December 1606

Wasn't that the settlement that broke down into cannibalism?

www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source...1ucYI-nOwQ6A7A (external - login to view)
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious CdnView Post

The Virginia Quay First Settlers Monument remembers the men, women and children who left the quayside for North America in December 1606

Wasn't that the settlement that broke down into cannibalism?

www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source...1ucYI-nOwQ6A7A (external - login to view)

I don't know why they just didn't go hunting.
 
Danbones
#4
so the gal died of white man's disease
 
Tecumsehsbones
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

I don't know why they just didn't go hunting.

Probably because Brits are retarded.

The "First Settlers" story also conveniently ignores the fact that the Spanish settlement of St. Augustin in what is now Florida was already 41 years old when the "first settlers" intrepidly set sail. That'd be more of that Brit retardation.

And of course that's only relevant if you exclude what is now Mexico and the Caribbean Islands and Canada (settled in the early 1500s, late 1400s, and 1603 respectively) from your definition of North America, as retarded Brits do.
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Probably because Brits are retarded.

The "First Settlers" story also conveniently ignores the fact that the Spanish settlement of St. Augustin in what is now Florida was already 41 years old when the "first settlers" intrepidly set sail. That'd be more of that Brit retardation.

And of course that's only relevant if you exclude what is now Mexico and the Caribbean Islands and Canada (settled in the early 1500s, late 1400s, and 1603 respectively) from your definition of North America, as retarded Brits do.

And don't forget that China and Angola are also excluded from the colonisation of America. Not just Mexico.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

And don't forget that China and Angola are also excluded from the colonisation of America. Not just Mexico.

Yes, your thesis is that Florida and Canada are no more part of North America than China and Angola.

Thank you for adding your little clod of stupid to the mountain of evidence that Brits are retarded.
 
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