Actors recreate St Patrick's first landing on Irish shores


Blackleaf
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Actors dressed in medieval clothing have re-enacted St Patrick's first landing on Irish shores in 432AD...

A saintly arrival: Actors dressed in medieval costumes take to a rowing boat to re-enact St Patrick's first landing on Irish shores in 432AD


Saint Patrick brought religion to Ireland after having a vision from God while he was still a slave

After escaping slavery Saint Patrick trained at a French monstary before returning to Ireland

Legend has it that he rid the country of snakes - although many interpret this as meaning paganism

Today, raucous celebrations are found around the world as people celebrate their Irish ancestry - no matter how distant

By Rod Ardehali For Mailonline
12 March 2017

Saint Patrick's Day is perhaps the most raucous celebration of any saint as parties and parades take place across the globe every year on March 17.

Shouts of slainte are to be heard amid clinking glasses of Guinness and whisky as people celebrate their Irish ancestry - no matter how distant.

So far have the Irish travelled that revelry is to be found in Australia, America and even parts of Africa - not forgetting Dublin itself.

But how much do most people really know about the Patron Saint of Ireland, the 16-year-old boy who was kidnapped by pirates - who allegedly rid Ireland of snakes - and whose original vestiments were actually blue, not green?


An actor playing Saint Patrick sails past Down Cathedral as the re-enactment of his first landing on Irish shores takes place at Inch Abbey in Downpatrick, Northern Ireland. The Irish annals for the fifth century date Patrick's arrival in Ireland at 432 and the patron saint of Ireland's remains are believed to buried at Down Cathedral


When Saint Patrick was 16-years-old he was kidnapped by Irish pirates and sold into slavery in Ireland. According to his autobiographical confessions, the following six years were spent working as a shepherd on Mount Slemish in Co. Antrim


During his six years imprisonment at the hands of slave owners, Saint Patrick began to reflect on his lack of faith and became a devout follower of Christianity. He spent much time praying and fasting before one day having a vision which led him to stow away on a boat bound for Britain - returning to his family

One night Saint Patrick had a dream that the Irish were calling him back needing to hear the word of God. This inspired him to return one day. However, he felt ill-prepared for a life as a missionary and travelled to France to train at a monastary


Some 12 years later he returned to Irish shores as a bishop having received the Pope's blessing to spread the word of God


Saint Patrick met the Celtic chieftain, Dichu, who would become his first convert. Dichu gave Patrick a barn two miles away at Saul - 'sabhall', meaning 'barn' in Irish. This became his first church




Some of chieftain Dichu's warriors pose during their reenactment carrying traditional Celtic weaponry and draped in tartan throws





King Dichu and his druidess pose for a portrait during the re-enactment of the landing of Saint Patrick on Irish shores


Patrick's real name was probably Maewyn Succat. His father, Calpornius, was a Romano-British army officer and a deacon. Legend has it that he used the native shamrock as a symbol of the holy trinity when preaching - while some say he brought the Latin alphabet to Ireland. However, contrary to popular belief, it was blue, not green, that coloured his vestiments


Patrick had great success in converting the Irish, and three assistant bishops from France were sent to help him, among them St. Sechnall. Within his lifetime the Irish had been transformed into God-fearing people




Under Irish law from 1903 to 1970, St. Patrick's Day was a religious observance for the entire country, meaning that all pubs were closed for the day. The law was overturned in 1970, when St. Patrick's was reclassified as a national holiday - allowing the taps to flow freely once again


Today, millions across the world celebrate Saint Patrick's Day with raucous parades. Dublin has a parade that attracts hundreds of thousands of people, while in Chicago the river is dyed green for a few hours. The biggest parade takes place in New York - a city with an enormous Irish tradition following the mass immigration during the Irish potato famine


According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland. In reality, this probably did not occur, as there is no evidence that snakes have ever existed in Ireland. Despite this, researchers suggest that the term 'snakes' may be figurative and refer to pagan religious beliefs and practices

Read more: Actors recreate St Patrick's return to Ireland | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 13th, 2017 at 06:49 AM..
 
darkbeaver
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#2
The snakes were the Druids, the serpent was revered as wisdom itself and Patrick the slave an ignorant enemy of wisdom and now the Irish are nothing but bank slaves.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

The snakes were the Druids, the serpent was revered as wisdom itself and Patrick the slave an ignorant enemy of wisdom and now the Irish are nothing but bank slaves.

The Paddies can always go back to Paganism if they want. Nothing stopping them.
 
coldstream
#4
Fad saol agat, Sláinte.

Long life to all, Patrick is said to have lived to 122, but accounts differ. Cheers.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstreamView Post

Fad saol agat, Sláinte.

Long life to all, Patrick is said to have lived to 122, but accounts differ. Cheers.

Nah. He was about 76 when he died.
 
Curious Cdn
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#6
Patrick was a a Welshman.

The Welsh, post-Roman occupation carried on what the could from the Roman Imperium into the Dark Ages.

Patrick wasn't the man's name. It was his rank ..."Patricius". He was a Romano-Briton Patrician, or aristocrat. His name could have been Dyfedd Jones, for all that we know but he twern't no Irishman. They made him a slave.
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious CdnView Post

Patrick was a a Welshman.

The Welsh, post-Roman occupation carried on what the could from the Roman Imperium into the Dark Ages.

Patrick wasn't the man's name. It was his rank ..."Patricius". He was a Romano-Briton Patrician, or aristocrat. His name could have been Dyfedd Jones, for all that we know but he twern't no Irishman. They made him a slave.

Well he wasn't Welsh. Wales didn't exist in the 5th Century.

Also, nobody knows for sure where he was born. The Scottish town of Old Kilpatrick claims he was born there. The Welsh town of Banwen also lays claim to being his birthplace. His grandfather, Potitus, was a priest from Banna Venta Berniae, which may have been the town of Ravenglass in Cumbria. So maybe he was born there.

St Patrick's real name was Maewyn Succat.


Old Kilpatrick




Ravenglass
 
coldstream
#8
People should read the Confessio of St. Patrick. It's a trifle long, but should be considered an essential text and authentic witness to the faith. It would go some way to atoning for guzzling all that green beer during Lent.


Confession | St. Patrick (external - login to view)#
 
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