Canada isn't morally superior


I think not
#1
The following is an excerpt from Roy Rempel's book, Dreamland: How Canada's Pretend Foreign Policy Has Undermined Sovereignty.

Roy Rempel, Citizen Special
Published: Friday, March 31, 2006

I like to stand up to the Americans. It's popular.
-- Jean Chretien, former prime minister - - -

In July 1997, then-prime minister Jean Chretien attended a summit meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in Spain. While speaking with prime minister Jean-Luc Dehaene of Belgium, before the meeting began, Mr. Chretien made some candid comments about American foreign policy. "All the [American] politicians would be in prison ... [in] your country and my country," he stated, because, "they sell their votes." He argued that the expansion of NATO's membership had nothing to do with "world security" and instead was driven by the desire of the Clinton administration to buy votes domestically.

What Chretien did not realize was that he was speaking into an open mike and that his comments were being picked up by the media. While some might be tempted to dismiss the remarks as the type of chatter that might result from political frustration over this or that issue, they nevertheless expose an anti-American tendency long evident in Canadian international policy. Indeed, Chretien bluntly indicated that he regarded anti-Americanism as politically useful. "I like to stand up to the Americans. It's popular," he told his Belgian counterpart. He bragged that on the issue of Cuba, for instance, "I was the first one to stand up. And people like that." He did acknowledge, however, that, "you have to be very careful because they're our friends."

This mentality is hardly unique to the former prime minister. Prime minister Paul Martin played to the same sentiment in his decision to reject a Canadian role in ballistic-missile defence. Anti-Americanism was also a prominent theme in the Liberal Party's 2005-06 election campaign. While this may be counterproductive in terms of advancing Canadian interests, Jack Granatstein has noted that Canadian "political and cultural elites continue to use anti-Americanism for their own purposes."

In other words, it is particular domestic political objectives that are perceived to be advanced by anti-Americanism. Most Canadian leaders, with the exception of some, such as Brian Mulroney, have viewed Canada-U.S. relations in this context. Regardless of whether Republicans or Democrats have dominated the political scene in the United States, playing an anti-American card has been perceived as generating political payoffs.

That anti-Americanism is seen as politically useful is indicative of something else. It reveals much about what Canadian international policy has become, in a general sense. Instead of being about advancing the national interest, foreign policy is perceived by many politicians as an extension of domestic partisan politics.

Despite the similarities between Canadian and American values and interests, much of the Canadian elite nevertheless believes that its values are fundamentally different from those of their American counterparts. While this policy has deep roots, this perception has grown since the election of George W. Bush as president in the United States. ...

In an article in March of 2005, former foreign minister Lloyd Axworthy argued that members of the Bush administration needed to "learn a thing or two" from Canadian values. He argued that unlike in the United States, where massive tax breaks were given to the top one per cent of the population "while cutting food programs for poor children," Canada was governed by a "different set of priorities." Internationally, he argued, this manifested itself in a foreign policy that protectd the rights of people, not just nation-states. The United States was of course said to be doing exactly the opposite. "There are times," he said "when truth [meaning Canada] must speak to power [meaning the United States]."

Obviously, official government statements do not refer to Canada as truth incarnate. Yet this general attitude has come to underscore much of Canada's international policy. At the heart of this is the belief that Canada is not only different from that of the United States, but morally superior. In the end, it is the wrong way to approach international policy and our relationship with the United States. While ordinary Canadians have the luxury of disliking and protesting the way in which the United States dealt with Iraq or with this or that aspect of the foreign policy of the Bush administration, the foreign policy of the Canadian government should never be sidetracked by emotion.

A position based on presumed moral superiority does nothing to advance the interests of the Canadian people. ... It is [also] inevitably hypocritical. No state is a bastion of moral virtue. If Canada, in general, seems to pursue a more altruistic international policy than the United States, it is only because we have been shielded from the most unpleasant aspects of international affairs by the United States. This is what allowed our former foreign minister [Pierre Pettigrew] to naively assert that "we are well beyond the traditional domain of power politics as played out between states." Because we do not have the international responsibilities that accrue from superpower status, we have come to believe that we possess a more virtuous national character.

Yet we have conveniently forgotten that, even at our own level, we have often failed to live up to our rhetoric. In recent years, for instance, Canada has chosen to aggressively promote trade with states like China and Cuba, even to protect the interests of one relatively small company in Sudan, while largely pushing human-rights concerns into the background. Canada is far from being as virtuous as it pretends.

Despite the contradictions, an ideological approach has continued to serve as the basis for Canada's international policy. ...

Making every issue from Iraq, to Kyoto, to nuclear weapons, to the [International Criminal Court] a moral test of American foreign policy, and making the "Canadian way" the litmus test, has been a foolish way for Canada to conduct its international policy. This is particularly so when it is really a mixture of the ideology of national leaders and the search for domestic political gain that determines the content of Canadian international policy. This approach to international policy has been irresponsible. It has squandered limited diplomatic capital and failed to advance the real interests of the Canadian people. It is an approach that Canada can no longer afford.

Roy Rempel is a former professor of international relations at Memorial University in St. John's. Dreamland is published for the Breakout Educational Network and Queen's University School of Policy Studies by McGill-Queen's University Press.

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/...667c1f7efd&p=1
 
Curiosity
#2
O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...
 
Kreskin
#3
He's a Newfie.
 
I think not
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...

I think I might actually order this book.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#5
Nuke Canada, rotten pricks,eh.
 
Curiosity
#6
Newfie

Is that an insulting thing to be? :P
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...


Hi Child see ya changed your avatar again, it won't help though ,you'll always be ugly. hahahahahahahehehehehehehahahahah
 
Kreskin
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

Newfie

Is that an insulting thing to be? :P

No, we believe in equal rights. We let them vote and play fiddle.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#9
Thar allowed to fish and fornicate too eh.
 
Kreskin
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Thar allowed to fish and fornicate too eh.

I think the fornicatin' is a secret.
 
Finder
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...


Hi Child see ya changed your avatar again, it won't help though ,you'll always be ugly. hahahahahahahehehehehehehahahahah

not nice... You know blonds have more fun even though they might not understand the issues as well.
 
Hank C
#12
yea I was listening to Rempel on the radio a couple days ago promoting his book. Anyways he had some interesting things to say about Canadian foreign policy compared to much more aggressive countries like Australia...ect

And he his correct that Canada is not somehow morally superior to Americans and we need to get rid of this jealous inferiority complex thing we got going. I dunno I might pick up his book if I got some time
 
Finder
#13
I don't think Canada, nor Caandians are in anyway more superior to the Americans at all. However I do believe we have a different set of priorities. I would hope most of us could agree on that at least.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#14
And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.
 
Finder
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.

but would we bomb if we had the bombs to bomb with darkbeaver?

I think Canada choose sometime between the late 50's and early 70's a different direction then the Americans.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#16
And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.
 
Finder
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.

Have you been out east? you might want to rethink that whole smelling thing.... or even in some parts of Toronto... hell yeah out west too they smell like cow **** in parts... So yeah we don't bomb, but we also smell just as bad as they do *sticks tongue out at the beaver*





hmmmm, you know they serve beaver tail in Ottawa?
 
Hank C
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

I don't think Canada, nor Caandians are in anyway more superior to the Americans at all. However I do believe we have a different set of priorities. I would hope most of us could agree on that at least.

i would agree, but it should be recognized that our priorities are not always different....we are similar countries. not say we mindlessly follow washington but our priorities are often mutual.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.

but would we bomb if we had the bombs to bomb with darkbeaver?

I think Canada choose sometime between the late 50's and early 70's a different direction then the Americans.

We are bombing in Afghanistan aren't we, we did take a different approach, a different direction maybe a little saner, whatever we are or did is because we live beside and with them they to a great degree
are our designers, let them deal with it, America has the world it built if it seems like frankinstien to them they have no one to blame but themselves, they require repair not the rest of the world.
 
Finder
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Hank C

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

I don't think Canada, nor Caandians are in anyway more superior to the Americans at all. However I do believe we have a different set of priorities. I would hope most of us could agree on that at least.

i would agree, but it should be recognized that our priorities are not always different....we are similar countries. not say we mindlessly follow washington but our priorities are often mutual.

We have things in common with almost any nation out there, Hank C, so I won't disagree with you there. I think in general Canadians want to just be Canadians and have a idenity of our own.
 
Finder
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

And ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.

but would we bomb if we had the bombs to bomb with darkbeaver?

I think Canada choose sometime between the late 50's and early 70's a different direction then the Americans.

We are bombing in Afghanistan aren't we, we did take a different approach, a different direction maybe a little saner, whatever we are or did is because we live beside and with them they to a great degree
are our designers, let them deal with it, America has the world it built if it seems like frankinstien to them they have no one to blame but themselves, they require repair not the rest of the world.

However the Afcan mission is sanctioned by the UN, are you telling me the United Nations has no rights in this affair and is only as Bush once threated "An orginization of debate"???
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverAnd ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.Have you been out east? you might want to rethink that whole smelling thing.... or even in some parts of Toronto... hell yeah out west too they smell like cow **** in parts... So yeah we don't bomb, but we also smell just as bad as they do *sticks tongue out at the beaver*
hmmmm, you know they serve beaver tail in Ottawa?

Quote has been trimmed
Don't tell them that for christ sake, if they find out it will go bad for us in the lumber thingy.
 
Hank C
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by Hank C

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

I don't think Canada, nor Caandians are in anyway more superior to the Americans at all. However I do believe we have a different set of priorities. I would hope most of us could agree on that at least.

i would agree, but it should be recognized that our priorities are not always different....we are similar countries. not say we mindlessly follow washington but our priorities are often mutual.

We have things in common with almost any nation out there, Hank C

but Canada is not as close, dependent, or similar to any country as it is to the united states.
 
Finder
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverAnd ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.Have you been out east? you might want to rethink that whole smelling thing.... or even in some parts of Toronto... hell yeah out west too they smell like cow **** in parts... So yeah we don't bomb, but we also smell just as bad as they do *sticks tongue out at the beaver*
hmmmm, you know they serve beaver tail in Ottawa?

Quote has been trimmed
Don't tell them that for christ sake, if they find out it will go bad for us in the lumber thingy.


They are very yummy *looks at your tails* mmmmmmm come here little beaver.... I have something for you
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverQuote: Originally Posted by FinderQuote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverAnd ya learn how to read.
We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.but would we bomb if we had the bombs to bomb with darkbeaver?
I think Canada choose sometime between the late 50's and early 70's a different direction then the Americans. We are bombing in Afghanistan aren't we, we did take a different approach, a different direction maybe a little saner, whatever we are or did is because we live beside and with them they to a great degree
are our designers, let them deal with it, America has the world it built if it seems like frankinstien to them they have no one to blame but themselves, they require repair not the rest of the world.However the Afcan mission is sanctioned by the UN, are you telling me the United Nations has no rights in this affair and is only as Bush once threated "An orginization of debate"???

Quote has been trimmed
We are not specifically sanctioned by the UN niether is the mission, read the fine print, under UN rules a country may respond to terrorism in this manner, there is no specific UN order.
 
Finder
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Hank C

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

Quote: Originally Posted by Hank C

Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

I don't think Canada, nor Caandians are in anyway more superior to the Americans at all. However I do believe we have a different set of priorities. I would hope most of us could agree on that at least.

i would agree, but it should be recognized that our priorities are not always different....we are similar countries. not say we mindlessly follow washington but our priorities are often mutual.

We have things in common with almost any nation out there, Hank C

but Canada is not as close, dependent, or similar to any country as it is to the united states.

We have just as many ties to the UK as that is the main historic country we are tied to. Then there were a lot of Irish immigrants, Chiness immigrants, and you can not forget about New France as well. Really our histories are completely different from each other once the Americans chose to seperate themselves frm the UK by violent means our governments have chosen different paths at times. I do not think the Americans have ever understood we never wished to be liberated by them nor be apart of there nations as they had seen the conquest of Canada as part of their "menifest destiny" for a long time. So I will have to disagree with you, Canada's friend to the south is immportant to Canada but we do not share some kind of mystical bond and brotherhood. We are nabours which chose different paths and I think most of us would like to keep that arms distance between our friendly nabours but keep good relations at the same time. :P
 
Finder
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by FinderQuote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverQuote: Originally Posted by FinderQuote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverAnd ya learn how to read. We are superior, just not morally superior, who cares, we are better looking, we are smarter, we don't bomb as much and we smell better.but would we bomb if we had the bombs to bomb with darkbeaver?I think Canada choose sometime between the late 50's and early 70's a different direction then the Americans. We are bombing in Afghanistan aren't we, we did take a different approach, a different direction maybe a little saner, whatever we are or did is because we live beside and with them they to a great degreeare our designers, let them deal with it, America has the world it built if it seems like frankinstien to them they have no one to blame but themselves, they require repair not the rest of the world.However the Afcan mission is sanctioned by the UN, are you telling me the United Nations has no rights in this affair and is only as Bush once threated "An orginization of debate"???Quote has been trimmed We are not specifically sanctioned by the UN niether is the mission, read the fine print, under UN rules a country may respond to terrorism in this manner, there is no specific UN order.

Quote has been trimmed
So what are you saying, we should leave Afcanistan and allow a vacum in our place, where thousands would most likely die at best, and a long civil war at worst for countless deaths. Really just like the USA in Iraq we are in a no win situation in Afcanistan. But if our troops are directed properly in Afcanistan and Canadians push for our mission to be a peace keeping mission we can do the right thing in Afcanistan and help.
 
Toro
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...


Hi Child see ya changed your avatar again, it won't help though ,you'll always be ugly. hahahahahahahehehehehehehahahahah

GRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!

WC is a babe!

And have I ever regaled you the story about the beaver that got shot in the pond out back?
 
Finder
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Toro

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver

Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

O O ITN

Now you've done it!

Get on the protective gear...


Hi Child see ya changed your avatar again, it won't help though ,you'll always be ugly. hahahahahahahehehehehehehahahahah

GRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!

WC is a babe!

And have I ever regaled you the story about the beaver that got shot in the pond out back?


did you eat the tale?
 
Doryman
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Finder

[
So what are you saying, we should leave Afcanistan and allow a vacum in our place, where thousands would most likely die at best, and a long civil war at worst for countless deaths. Really just like the USA in Iraq we are in a no win situation in Afcanistan. But if our troops are directed properly in Afcanistan and Canadians push for our mission to be a peace keeping mission we can do the right thing in Afcanistan and help.


That's exactly what he's saying. If that happens, the beav gets to leave a huge mess for beav jr. to protest in 15 yrs. I can see it now......

"Why did you capitalist pigs pull out of 'stan. Any retard knows that total chaos would have resulted! THis was all for oil! I'm going to post poorly spelled rants on a website!!!! Death to Bush!""

That's how people like him care for their next generation. It's like working, only for wing-nuts...

The guy has a point though, Canada does spend too much time bashing the US, and not enough time improving things ourselves. I really do believe it's part of an inferiority complex.
 

Similar Threads

2
What's Up With Lake Superior?
by Curiosity | Jul 30th, 2007
no new posts