A deep sea port in the Arctic? Nonsense!


cyberclark
#1
The Manhattan’s Arctic Voyage See Manhattan

The US driven Manhattan was a Howard Hughes initiative. Driven by multi 6000 HP motors and an ice strengthened structure it embarked across the Arctic Passage.

Because of the very shallow depth of the Arctic Ocean the ship travelled empty, with just enough fuel to get by on with help by refuelling depots. The passage is too shallow for a ship like that or for a ship of any cargo tonnage.

It arrived Prudhoe Bay all cut to hell by the ice. Hull breached in a dozen places and compartments blocked off to stop the ship from sinking. Assistance was given by the Canadian Icebreaker John A MacDonald. The Manhattan would have sunk had it not been for this “assistance”. Hindsight being what it is ---

One only 45 gallon drum of Alaska crude oil was loaded aboard the Manhattan after being carried by a smaller craft several miles into the Arctic Ocean. Again, the ocean too shallow for the Manhattan to get closer to he shore.

The Manhattan’s return trip was harsh. As it moved towards New York the Master of the vessel had tanks flooded with sea water to sink the ship lower into the water making the Manhattan appear loaded on one part and to hide the holes in its sides and the much deteriorated state.

To much fan fair this “loaded and successful “trip; delivering Alaskan crude to New York was heralded by US media as the success of the century. No mention total crude moved was one drum.

A deep sea port would be a waste unless you are prepared to re shape the channels on the ocean floor up there!

Mr. Harper is watching too much TV for his information source. Deep sea Arctic port? Dig a hole in his own back yard would make more sense.

Mr. Martin on the other hand appears to be more right wing than the Conservatives but at least, he knows the issues. He’s set to open the Canada Health Act and make changes to allow for private practice. There goes your health care!

Mr. Layton offers the only second choice as I have come to see it.

John Clark
cyberclark@shaw.ca
 
Durgan
#2
The Manhattan voyage in 1969.

http://gunmitor.notlong.com/

SS Manhattan's 1969 Voyage
Among the 120 people aboard Manhattan on its 1969 voyage were a number of scientists and researchers. Their mission was to collect information for use in calculating the conditions that a proposed new generation of supertankers might encounter during year-round use of the Northwest Passage.

The company needed to know how much engine power and steel would be required for a ship to break through the worst possible ice conditions and still have room for carrying oil. Toward that end, scientists drilled core samples through pack ice as thick as 22 feet to examine such properties as temperature, hardness, and salinity.

During the trip, a symbolic barrel of oil was taken aboard at Prudhoe Bay, AK and the mission declared a success. However, the 55-gallon barrel was the only Arctic crude ever shipped back to the East Coast this way. Plans were abandoned for using the Northwest Passage as a shipping route for Alaskan crude. For while the Northwest Passage was technically possible as a shipping route, its use year-round was deemed unfeasible.


Compiled by Durgan
 
Durgan
#3
http://gunmitor1.notlong.com
Prompted by the discovery of oil in Prudhoe Bay on the North Slope of Alaska in 1968, the Humble Oil & Refining Company and Atlantic Richfield Company decided to test the feasibility of transporting oil via ship through the Northwest Passage.

They chartered the tanker Manhattan and sent her to the Sun Shipyard at Chester, Pennsylvania, for conversion to an icebreaker. The world's largest commercial ship when commissioned, Manhattan had had a checkered career as a tanker because her deep draft forced her either to sail light or to transship her cargoes outside of port. In preparation for her Arctic voyage, Manhattan was cut into four sections, each of which was modified for work in the ice. When reassembled, the ship had grown 65 feet in length and 16 feet in beam.

On August 24, 1969 (exactly one month after Apollo 11 returned to Earth from the first manned lunar landing), Manhattan sailed from Chester with 112 crew, scientists, and journalists. Escorted by the Canadian icebreaker John A. Macdonald, on September 5 she sailed west across the top of Baffin Island into Lancaster Sound.

Stopped by the ice about 50 miles into McClure Strait between Melville and Banks Islands, on September 10, Manhattan's Captain Arthur W. Smith executed a U-turn and headed south to pass through Prince of Wales Strait between Banks and Victoria Islands and entered Amundsen Sound on September 14. Turning west along the coast of continental Canada, Manhattan arrived five days later at Prudhoe Bay where she took aboard a symbolic cargo of one barrel of oil. On the 21st, she reached Point Barrow, her western terminus.

During the return voyage, engineers conducted tests to determine the machinery requirements needed for commercial navigation through the ice. Exiting Lancaster Sound on October 30, Manhattan returned to New York on November 12.

Although her success showed that the voyage was physically possible, the route was neither environmentally nor economically sound, and it was decided to build a trans-Alaska pipeline to Valdez on Prince William Sound. Manhattan resumed regular service again until 1987. Laid up off Yosu, South Korea, she was scrapped after grounding in a typhoon.

Compiled by Durgan.
 
cyberclark
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by cyberclark

The Manhattan’s Arctic Voyage See Manhattanhttp://www.athropolis.com/arctic-facts/fact-manhattan.htm

The US driven Manhattan was a Howard Hughes initiative. Driven by multi 6000 HP motors and an ice strengthened structure it embarked across the Arctic Passage.

Because of the very shallow depth of the Arctic Ocean the ship travelled empty, with just enough fuel to get by on with help by refuelling depots. The passage is too shallow for a ship like that or for a ship of any cargo tonnage.

It arrived Prudhoe Bay all cut to hell by the ice. Hull breached in a dozen places and compartments blocked off to stop the ship from sinking. Assistance was given by the Canadian Icebreaker John A MacDonald. The Manhattan would have sunk had it not been for this “assistance”. Hindsight being what it is ---

One only 45 gallon drum of Alaska crude oil was loaded aboard the Manhattan after being carried by a smaller craft several miles into the Arctic Ocean. Again, the ocean too shallow for the Manhattan to get closer to he shore.

The Manhattan’s return trip was harsh. As it moved towards New York the Master of the vessel had tanks flooded with sea water to sink the ship lower into the water making the Manhattan appear loaded on one part and to hide the holes in its sides and the much deteriorated state.

To much fan fair this “loaded and successful “trip; delivering Alaskan crude to New York was heralded by US media as the success of the century. No mention total crude moved was one drum.

A deep sea port would be a waste unless you are prepared to re shape the channels on the ocean floor up there!

Mr. Harper is watching too much TV for his information source. Deep sea Arctic port? Dig a hole in his own back yard would make more sense.

Mr. Martin on the other hand appears to be more right wing than the Conservatives but at least, he knows the issues. He’s set to open the Canada Health Act and make changes to allow for private practice. There goes your health care!

Mr. Layton offers the only MODERATE choice as I have come to see it.

John Clark
cyberclark@shaw.ca

 
cyberclark
#5
[quote="cyberclark"]The Manhattan’s Arctic Voyage


The US driven Manhattan was a Howard Hughes initiative. Driven by multi 6000 HP motors and an ice strengthened structure it embarked across the Arctic Passage.

Because of the very shallow depth of the Arctic Ocean the ship travelled empty, with just enough fuel to get by on with help by refuelling depots. The passage is too shallow for a ship like that or for a ship of any cargo tonnage.

It arrived Prudhoe Bay all cut to hell by the ice. Hull breached in a dozen places and compartments blocked off to stop the ship from sinking. Assistance was given by the Canadian Icebreaker John A MacDonald. The Manhattan would have sunk had it not been for this “assistance”. Hindsight being what it is ---

One only 45 gallon drum of Alaska crude oil was loaded aboard the Manhattan after being carried by a smaller craft several miles into the Arctic Ocean. Again, the ocean too shallow for the Manhattan to get closer to he shore.

The Manhattan’s return trip was harsh. As it moved towards New York the Master of the vessel had tanks flooded with sea water to sink the ship lower into the water making the Manhattan appear loaded on one part and to hide the holes in its sides and the much deteriorated state.

To much fan fair this “loaded and successful “trip; delivering Alaskan crude to New York was heralded by US media as the success of the century. No mention total crude moved was one drum.

A deep sea port would be a waste unless you are prepared to re shape the channels on the ocean floor up there!

Mr. Harper is watching too much TV for his information source. Deep sea Arctic port? Dig a hole in his own back yard would make more sense.

Mr. Martin on the other hand appears to be more right wing than the Conservatives but at least, he knows the issues. He’s set to open the Canada Health Act and make changes to allow for private practice. There goes your health care!

Mr. Layton offers the only second choice as I have come to see it.

John Clark
cyberclark@shaw.ca[/url]http://www.a...-manhattan.htm
 
Cosmo
#6
Cyberclark ... check your PMs
 

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