Shhh! Law At Work - Man deported to Netherlands after 60 years in Canada


petros
#1
It's devastating me,' says Len Van Heest, who blames his bipolar disorder for his criminal convictions.

A 59-year-old B.C. man who had lived in Canada since he was a baby has been deported to the Netherlands because of his criminal offences, which he says were due to his mental illness.

"This is the only home I've ever known," Len Van Heest said in a tearful interview Monday at Vancouver International Airport. "And they're kicking me out now.

"They're sending me to a foreign country, they're taking my mom away from me, all my friends. I'm devastated."

Van Heest moved to Canada with his parents when he was eight months old and the country is the only home he has ever known. His mother has said not getting him Canadian citizenship was an oversight on her part.

Van Heest was first ordered deported in January 2008 after he was found inadmissible to stay in Canada because of a 2001 conviction for assault with a weapon.

His is one of several cases in which immigrants face removal after the previous Conservative government toughened laws regarding the deportation of non-citizen criminals, his lawyer Peter Golden said in an earlier interview with CBC.

According to court documents, he was convicted of more than 40 criminal charges between 1976 and 2013. He was denied permanent Canadian residency because of his criminal record.

Van Heest said his crimes were the result of bipolar disorder, which he developed as a teenager. He served nine months for assault, but said he's in control of his mental illness now and doesn't drink or do drugs.

Motion denied

After years of delays, Van Heest's latest motion to stay in Vancouver was denied last Thursday. He has applied for permanent residence status based on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

Just before 3 p.m. Monday, Canadian border officials escorted Van Heest onto the plane.

"I always cheer for Canada, you know, and all the Canadians I root for," he said in thanking friends and family. "But they've taken it all away from me now."

In court documents, Van Heest has said that he would not be capable of obtaining health care, housing, income or a social network in the Netherlands.

Van Heest leaves behind in Canada his mother, Trixie, 81, whom he lived with, as well as his brother, and his nieces and nephews.

"We play scrabble. She does my laundry. I help her cut the grass and stuff. We're just the best of friends. It's devastating my mom, it's devastating me, it's devastating my whole family."

Green Party Leader, Elizabeth May has appealed to the Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen to stop the deportation.

"I'm very concerned because once a person is deported, it becomes extremely difficult for them to ever come back into Canada," May said in an interview.

"His only family is in Canada. He has no connections, that we know of, in the Netherlands. He doesn't speak the language. I can't even begin to imagine how he's going to manage. It's just heartbreaking."

A spokesperson for federal Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said the minister wouldn't comment on the case.

Like a 'foreign country'

Van Heest's lawyer, Robin Bajer, says he is appealing to have Van Heest granted permanent residence status on compassionate grounds. But that decision could take up to 36 months.

In the meantime, Van Heest will be waiting in limbo in the Netherlands. He said he doesn't know his relatives there very well.

"I have no plans once I arrive," he said. "My cousin is going to meet me there . . . or my auntie, or whoever she is, and I'll just take it from there.

"It's like a foreign country, I have no idea what I'm going to do."

Cory Correia - CBC News
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#2
Right on!!!!

Let's fuk over the mentally ill. While we're at it, we should deport all immigrants with cancer.
 
Twila
#3
Not sure how I feel about this. 40 criminal convictions for the span of 37yrs. Has had a lot of time to get it right and get his citizenship.

Being bipolar is a pretty poor excuse for his criminal record. Has he paid taxes and done anything to make himself a welcome person to Canada?

Sounds like he suffers from a severe case of biting his nose to spite his face.
 
TenPenny
#4
He has 40 criminal convictions, and he isn't a Canadian citizen.


Certainly raises some questions.
 
petros
+4
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

Right on!!!!

Let's fuk over the mentally ill. While we're at it, we should deport all immigrants with cancer.

You're next!
 
Hoof Hearted
+1
#6
Screw him!

He was convicted of 40 criminal charges! Buh-Bye!

 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#7
One does have to wonder why no one bothered to get him citizenship 35 or 40 years ago.
Although I do know a guy that found out the hard way he was not a Canadian citizen when he got stopped at the US boarder. Seems that when he came to Canada ad a child he was young enough to travel on his mother's British pasport and everyone forgot about it. HE was born in Northern Rodesia which no longer exists so for a while no one knew what to do with him. Oddly enough he had even voted in Canada.

So where are the libtards that are all up in arms over some woman from Pakistan that was denied entry to the US even though she has a Canadian passport?
 
bill barilko
#8
Quote:

he was convicted of more than 40 criminal charges between 1976 and 2013. He was denied permanent Canadian residency because of his criminal record.



Listen 'ironically'

httpwwwyoutubecomwatchvVAG-yYELTQg

 
spaminator
#9
Deportation of bipolar man who came to Canada as baby called 'heartless' | Canad
 
Kreskin
#10
This is crazy. Heartless for sure. Where is selfie-boy? Time for him to step up and get some common sense applied.
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+1
#11
So let me get this straight. If you're mentally ill, came here as an 8 month old and your parents never bothered to naturalize you, you can be kicked out. But, if you're a Libtard cabinet member who's mother lied on your entry document to come to Canada, you not only get to stay, you get to keep your position.
What a bunch of f*cking jackwitted hypocrites.
Meanwhile, we have criminals from non-European countries that we just can't seem to deport.
 
White_Unifier
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by JinentonixView Post

So let me get this straight. If you're mentally ill, came here as an 8 month old and your parents never bothered to naturalize you, you can be kicked out. But, if you're a Libtard cabinet member who's mother lied on your entry document to come to Canada, you not only get to stay, you get to keep your position.
What a bunch of f*cking jackwitted hypocrites.
Meanwhile, we have criminals from non-European countries that we just can't seem to deport.

Does does European or non-European origin have to do with this?
 
Twila
#13
I'm not sure how this can be construed as heartless when the individual involved seems to be incapable of doing anything that would ensure being deported couldn't happen.

If it's heartless to deport him it's because he's brainless on how to stay.

It's not like he was recently diagnosed and therefore his crimes could be considered a product of an unknown and therefore untreated mental illness.

Also, the netherlands is not a hardship country. They ALL speak english. IT's a huge travel destination for many Canadians (been there myself) They aren't a religious country. If refugees are able to navigate a country that is vastly different then their own and do it successfully as many of them do, then this man can surely navigate a country that is extremely similar to our own.
 
White_Unifier
+2
#14
I'm impressed. Most Quebecers can't speak English.
 
Twila
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by White_UnifierView Post

I'm impressed. Most Quebecers can't speak English.

can't or won't? I've heard both.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
+2
#16
It's interesting how people equate mentally illness with being stupid or brainless.

Is it any wonder that mental illness is still stigmatized
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by White_UnifierView Post

Does does European or non-European origin have to do with this?

It means that Holland is a European country. If you want an example, look at that piece of sh*t from Rwanda that's been here illegally for years, in and out of prison, committing crimes. And yet they can't deport him because he won't sign some f*cking papers? Give me a goddam break.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+2
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

It's interesting how people equate mentally illness with being stupid or brainless.

Is it any wonder that mental illness is still stigmatized

What you have isn't mental illness. Just stupid. And since you already live in Alberta there is not much point in deporting you.
 
petros
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

It's interesting how people equate mentally illness with being stupid or brainless.

Is it any wonder that mental illness is still stigmatized

So you are crazy and act stupid or you are just stupid and act crazy?
 
EagleSmack
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by JinentonixView Post

It means that Holland is a European country. If you want an example, look at that piece of sh*t from Rwanda that's been here illegally for years, in and out of prison, committing crimes. And yet they can't deport him because he won't sign some f*cking papers? Give me a goddam break.

No kidding! Send that guy back to Rwanda already.

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

It's devastating me,' says Len Van Heest, who blames his bipolar disorder for his criminal convictions.

A 59-year-old B.C. man who had lived in Canada since he was a baby has been deported to the Netherlands because of his criminal offences, which he says were due to his mental illness.

Ahhhh... so he was one of those "dreamers" of the Canadian variety.

And Trudeau sent him home.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

can't or won't? I've heard both.

Depends. When I was in Montreal, I'd caught a stranger speaking in English once and then just to test her, I asked her a question in English and she pretended to not know it.

In Quebec City, the total opposite. Though I'm a native French speaker, I have a slight English accent when I speak French. I asked a person on the street in French where the local library was, and he tried his darnedest to answer me in English before being defeated by his limited English and switched to French. I think he wanted to impress me with his English. He did know some English so I congratulated him on it. English is not easy after all.

So the irony is that those who know English well might refuse to speak it and those who don't will at least try.

Ironic, innit?

Quote: Originally Posted by JinentonixView Post

It means that Holland is a European country. If you want an example, look at that piece of sh*t from Rwanda that's been here illegally for years, in and out of prison, committing crimes. And yet they can't deport him because he won't sign some f*cking papers? Give me a goddam break.

The problem with his case is that he claimed to come from Rwanda but he might also have come from Tanzania and he had no documents. Kind of hard to send him back when we don't know where 'back' is.

Maybe we can board him on an RCAF flight with troops to an allied state and then sneak him off the plane and dump him there?
 
Twila
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

It's interesting how people equate mentally illness with being stupid or brainless.

Is it any wonder that mental illness is still stigmatized

I don't equate mental illness with brainless, but I do find it infuriating that some are willing to use their mental illness as a reason for not being able to follow the law.

I can't decide if the reporters are using his mental illness or if he's using his mental illness for gain...
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by White_UnifierView Post

I'm impressed. Most Quebecers can't speak English.

Being an English speaking Quebecer by birth and up-bringing I would have to say that ... It's true.
It's not true in Montreal, though.
 
White_Unifier
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious CdnView Post

Being an English speaking Quebecer by birth and up-bringing I would have to say that ... It's true.
It's not true in Montreal, though.

Generally true, but always exceptions. I've met fluent English speakers in the remotest parts of Quebec and a French speaker in Ottawa who barely knew English (since she moved to Ottawa not long before after getting married). to be safe, it's best to assume the person is telling the truth until proved otherwise. And if so, best to just ignore him. Not worth fighting over.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

I don't equate mental illness with brainless, but I do find it infuriating that some are willing to use their mental illness as a reason for not being able to follow the law....

I hear ya. The nerve of people that use an illness that affects how they think as an excuse for not thinking right
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

It's devastating me,' says Len Van Heest, who blames his bipolar disorder for his criminal convictions.

A 59-year-old B.C. man who had lived in Canada since he was a baby has been deported to the Netherlands because of his criminal offences, which he says were due to his mental illness.

"This is the only home I've ever known," Len Van Heest said in a tearful interview Monday at Vancouver International Airport. "And they're kicking me out now.

"They're sending me to a foreign country, they're taking my mom away from me, all my friends. I'm devastated."


Cory Correia - CBC News


I think our illustrious Prime Minister has to take the credit for that idiocy!
 
Twila
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

I hear ya. The nerve of people that use an illness that affects how they think as an excuse for not thinking right

not what I meant.

bi polar does not mean no responsiblity for your actions. If the majority of bi polar sufferers are NOT out committing crimes then surely this gentleman can also not commit crimes? Surely, since he's been diagnosed and medicated he can manage himself.

I have a friend with the same mental illness. Hasn't committed any crimes. Has had episodes and he must be very careful about how he lives and what he does. But he makes the choice to do what he must (just like the a mentally healthy person does) and he has a support system...just like this bloke.

At some point in time even the mentally ill have to take responsibility for their lives, no?
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#28
I glad you are so knowledgeable about this man's condition. I had no idea that all bi-polar individuals suffer exactly the same way.
 
Twila
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

I glad you are so knowledgeable about this man's condition. I had no idea that all bi-polar individuals suffer exactly the same way.

we could continue to talk about whether a mentally ill person is responsible for their actions or not or you can continue on with your sarcastic assumptions, insinuations. I've lots of time for the first...
 
Remington1
#30
I stand by my fellow Canadians who make these decisions. If he was deported, I'm sure his rap sheet was concerning. Blaming his condition is wrong, sounds more like a career criminal!
 
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