Why is the CBC refusing to hand over info to CRA about potential CDN tax cheats?


Locutus
+1
#1
can't understand why.


The Conservative Party’s national revenue critic is calling on the CBC to hand over its Panama Papers data to Canada’s tax agency, something the Crown corporation is refusing to do.

Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, Alta.) says information coming out of a mammoth leak of documents detailing a global transfer of wealth into offshore accounts is fair game for the Canada Revenue Agency to demand.

“If someone says, especially the media, ‘I have something,’…I think they have to back it up,” Mr. Aboultaif told The Hill Times in an interview.

“Maybe they have information the CRA doesn’t have, and the CRA is asking for details, and I think they have the right to do so.”

The tax agency has formally asked the CBC to hand over the information, the broadcaster reported April 11, but the CBC is refusing, saying it does not reveal its sources and pointing to a similar request in 2013 that it also rejected.

Mr. Aboultaif said press freedom can’t always trump the public interest. “[If] it has to do with the public, public issues…I think they need to back it up,” he said.

There are 350 Canadians in the database leak, CBC has said, citing an unspecified report. News articles indicate that the information in the leak comes from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca. The Hill Times has not seen the documents and cannot independently verify the information.

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists is working with two Canadian news outlets, the CBC and the Toronto Star, as well as others around the world to process the cache of records into news stories.

The consortium has already rebuffed requests to release the data en masse, stating that while the Panama Papers reveal questionable activity by politicians, banks and celebrities, “other parts of the data are of a private nature and of no interest to the public.”

mo


Tory critic wants a reluctant CBC to hand over Panama Papers | (external - login to view)
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#2
Is Peter Mansbridge on the list?
 
tay
#3
They aren't tax cheats. What they are doing is legal and allowed by CRA and the tax laws the governments allow to happen.

http://tvo.org/programs/the-great-canadian-tax-dodge (external - login to view)


The following Toronto Star story has 'tax dodgers' in the headline. That leads one to feel that what these people/corporations are doing is illegal but it isn't; unfair to all of us losers who pay all our taxes, but it is still legal for them....

Crackdown on Canada’s tax dodgers should include naming and shaming: Editorial | Toronto Star
 
MHz
+1
#4
So it looks like they aren't giving the names of just the people they don't like.
Let's say the tax rate for somebody with $100k income is 30%, when a person has an income of $1M, $10M. $100M $1B per year the rate should rise above the 30 % mark rather than drop down below what the 'poor pay'. The rich pay more taxes but they still have a lot more money to play with in a year than the lowest earners, to the point they could not spend all they make in a single year. That is another method of taking money out of the pockets of the 'poor'.
Last edited by MHz; Apr 13th, 2016 at 06:07 PM..
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#5
Tory critic wants a reluctant CBC to hand over Panama Papers | (external - login to view)

Names incl in these papers possibly include;

Martin
Desmarie
Chretin
The Trudeau Trust Foundation?
 
MHz
#6
No Mulroney, your investigation is already flawed. He should be front and center and the punishment should be of the kind that the other crooks are scrambling to make a deal.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#7
Yeah, I could see an account with the name Mulroney in those papers
 
MHz
#8
Martin would still be the most public profiled person as he was our finance minister also.

httpwwwyoutubecomwatchvUbACCGf6q-c

 
tay
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Tory critic wants a reluctant CBC to hand over Panama Papers | (external - login to view)

Names incl in these papers possibly include;

Martin
Desmarie
Chretin
The Trudeau Trust Foundation?

Martin and Desmarie for sure...

The Great Canadian Tax Dodge | TVO.org (external - login to view)


Senior enforcement officials from the CRA were treated to private receptions at an exclusive Ottawa club, hosted by a small group of influential tax accountants that included personnel from KPMG — even as the firm was facing a CRA probe for running a $130-million tax dodge in the Isle of Man.

At the same time Canada's tax agency was in confidential talks with KPMG over its refusal to hand over the names of its multimillionaire clients who used the offshore scheme.

The CRA wouldn't confirm who attended the events, and none of the known industry or government attendees contacted by CBC News would talk about them. The Rideau Club operates under a code known as the "Chatham House Rules": to encourage open discussion, you can't reveal what others say at meetings.

The Rideau Club gatherings were not the only industry-funded events attended by government tax officials

CBC News has documented more than 50 hospitality events, including "tailgate parties," "cocktails" and "food and drinks" at numerous tax industry conferences since 2010. The events were attended by CRA executives and employees, and sponsored and paid for by tax industry associations and accounting and law firms across the country — the very firms the agency is responsible for regulating, auditing and, on occasion, penalizing. Most of the receptions took place during conferences attended by personnel from the private tax industry and government.

Robin Benger, an independent documentary producer who directed The Great Canadian Tax Dodge for TVOntario, investigated the tax industry for more than three years and attended a 2013 Canadian Tax Foundation conference. After listening to speeches by both government and industry tax officials, he said, he vividly recalls the Osler reception at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto.

"CRA top people" attended the party, he said. "They were being plied with drinks and getting on roaringly with all the tax lawyers and accountants."

Benger says he was "stunned" by the relationship he observed between the tax law companies, the accountants and the CRA. He argues the "rule makers" were too close to "rule twisters."

CRA execs treated to soirees at private club amid KPMG probe - Canada - CBC News
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#10
I am sure the CBC has reported ALL the names on the list .... not just the ones who are conservatives or business people.

But given this is legal, why is it a big deal to withhold the list?
 
tay
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I am sure the CBC has reported ALL the names on the list .... not just the ones who are conservatives or business people.

But given this is legal, why is it a big deal to withhold the list?

Embarrassment?

Shouldn't our Conservative friend be quizzing the CRA for the names instead of the CBC? the CRA is a direct Govt agency What is the CRA hiding? Okay we already have a rough idea as to what they are hiding.

Seems like a lot of murkiness between the CRA and KPMG.

As for the CBC not wanting to release the info we need only look at who calls the shots there in the Board room....

Nine of the eleven current members of the CBC Board of Directors - were appointed by Prime Minister Harper




 
mentalfloss
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Embarrassment?

Shouldn't our Conservative friend be quizzing the CRA for the names instead of the CBC? the CRA is a direct Govt agency What is the CRA hiding? Okay we already have a rough idea as to what they are hiding.

Seems like a lot of murkiness between the CRA and KPMG.

As for the CBC not wanting to release the info we need only look at who calls the shots there in the Board room....

Nine of the eleven current members of the CBC Board of Directors - were appointed by Prime Minister Harper




Shocking.

I am shocked.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

They aren't tax cheats. What they are doing is legal and allowed by CRA and the tax laws the governments allow to happen.

http://tvo.org/programs/the-great-canadian-tax-dodge (external - login to view)


The following Toronto Star story has 'tax dodgers' in the headline. That leads one to feel that what these people/corporations are doing is illegal but it isn't; unfair to all of us losers who pay all our taxes, but it is still legal for them....

Crackdown on Canada’s tax dodgers should include naming and shaming: Editorial | Toronto Star

Meaning it is a non story. Typical of the CBC.
 
mentalfloss
+2
#14
Yes, stories you don't like = 'typical of <insert news outlet here>'
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Yes, stories you don't like = 'typical of <insert news outlet here>'

Where is the story? It seems all are agreed that nothing illegal has been done but CBC is making a big issue of it with out revealing names. Non story.
 
mentalfloss
#16
Where have to been during all of this?

The whole discussion has been around the fact that it is currently legal but completely unethical.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+2
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Where have to been during all of this?

The whole discussion has been around the fact that it is currently legal but completely unethical.

If it is legal it is not unethical. Don't like it change the rules. Or join them.
 
mentalfloss
#18
I usually believe in our legal system but even I'm not drinking this koolaid.

Also you do realize that laws don't change overnight right?

That's why it begins with these kinds of discussions.
 
TenPenny
+1
#19
Now that we know the top people at CRA in charge of investigation and enforcement were being wined and dined by KPMG, why bother to turn over anything anyway?


They're all in a little club to steal from the middle class.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Embarrassment?

Shouldn't our Conservative friend be quizzing the CRA for the names instead of the CBC? the CRA is a direct Govt agency What is the CRA hiding? Okay we already have a rough idea as to what they are hiding.


The CBC is essentially a gvt agency as well... What are they hiding?
 
Kreskin
+1
#21
The CRA can go beyond 'asking' and instead issue a 'Requirement to Provide Documents'. If this situation is beyond the scope of their powers to request those documents then there is no need to complain about the CBC.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

The CRA can go beyond 'asking' and instead issue a 'Requirement to Provide Documents'. If this situation is beyond the scope of their powers to request those documents then there is no need to complain about the CBC.

I believe that the Requirement to Provide Documents would be subject to the CRA auditing an individual or company (the CBC in this case).

I would imagine that if teh CRA wanted those docs from the CBC, they would need to go outside their jurisdiction and get a Court Order compelling the CBC to deliver
 
Kreskin
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

I believe that the Requirement to Provide Documents would be subject to the CRA auditing an individual or company (the CBC in this case).

I would imagine that if teh CRA wanted those docs from the CBC, they would need to go outside their jurisdiction and get a Court Order compelling the CBC to deliver

That makes sense. Short of a court order the CBC should not be providing anything to the CRA.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#24
There would be a good chance that the CBC would be a target for lawsuits from the individuals/companies in the document... I don't know what the claim would be (libel or some kind of breech of confidentiality?) but chances are they would be receiving a lot of letters from law firms.

That said, makes you wonder why the CBC would touch this unless they could prove the implied allegations
 
JamesBondo
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Shocking.

I am shocked.

Were expecting them to be appointed by Elizabeth May?
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#26
I'm not sure protecting a source applies here. I mean they can still hand over the papers without saying who the source was. I do support a news agency in its protection of sources, and everyone here should too.
 
tay
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

The CRA can go beyond 'asking' and instead issue a 'Requirement to Provide Documents'. If this situation is beyond the scope of their powers to request those documents then there is no need to complain about the CBC.

KPMG knows who is on the list.

KPMG has wink, winked with the CRA to get laws changed.

In the original post the Conservative Ziad Aboultaif calls for the CBC to release the names because he's a Conservative and because the CBC is easy meat to pick on.

But he is he going after the wrong entity and the CBC angle is just a distraction......


The CRA is rotten to the core. Time to clean house.

This disgraceful action on the part of the CRA is just the latest in a long line of scandals that prove it has forgotten that its role is to protect the tax system — not destroy it through corruption, lax controls and a tendency to protect the wealthy from the consequences of their greed.

Remember that corruption scandal that erupted in the Montreal’s CRA office a few years back? A police probe of the Montreal mafia turned up a scheme which allegedly saw government-employed auditors conspiring with crooked entrepreneurs to help them evade millions of dollars worth of taxes. There were reportedly cash bribes and outings to Montreal Canadiens hockey games, where CRA auditors were wined and dined by their unsavory business partners.

Which explains why the Canada Revenue Agency was in such a hurry to offer a secret amnesty deal last year to the wealthy clients of KPMG who had been caught evading millions of dollars in taxes. The CRA reported participants in the scheme paid a 15 per cent cut on taxes saved to KPMG, sent their fortunes to the Isle of Man — a well-known tax haven — and got it paid back to them as tax-free gifts.

Meanwhile, the rest of us are expected to candidly file our taxes and be grateful for a few bucks saved on a TFSA or a tax credit for our children’s ballet lessons.

According to the CBC, which conducted a thorough investigation of the scam, beneficiaries of the KPMG scheme won’t face penalties, won’t be threatened with criminal prosecution or — God forbid — jail. As for the professional accountants and lawyers who concoct such schemes and profit handsomely from them, they can go back to dreaming up new ways of ripping off the Canadian taxpayer and scoring fat government contracts — while remaining generous contributors to our governing parties. That’s the Canadian way.

The CRA has also shown itself to be incapable of protecting the privacy of Canadians against unreasonable intrusion. Last month, the Security Intelligence Review Committee disclosed that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service had managed to get its hands on private taxpayer information from the CRA without a warrant and in clear breach of the law. The CRA, clueless as ever, said it didn’t know what information had been shared but assured the public that the rogue employee who had handed over the data was no longer there.

This week, we learned that the CRA turned over 155,000 banking records to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (external - login to view) in the middle of last year’s federal election — without waiting for the outcome of a court challenge to this unprecedented sharing of taxpayer data, without hearing an opinion from the Privacy Commissioner. And the individuals involved have never been informed by the CRA of its action.

more

The Canada Revenue Agency is rotten to the core. Time to clean house. – iPolitics (external - login to view)
 
tay
#28
KPMG official tells MPs firm no longer in tax-shelter business


The accounting firm KPMG got out of the tax-shelter business years ago after a change in taxation laws and in Canadian expectations, a senior executive told a House of Commons committee Tuesday.

Gregory Wiebe, KPMG's "global head of tax," was responding to questions about the firm's controversial Isle of Man offshore tax scheme created in 1999, which the Canada Revenue Agency has alleged "intended to deceive" federal tax authorities.

"Like every business, we've changed dramatically since 1999," he said. "We have no tax shelters that we sell. ... The tax shelter regime in Canada is just something we're not part of."

KPMG operates around the world through a network of independent national affiliates, including one in Canada that employs around 6,000 people in more than 30 offices across the country. All are members of KPMG International Co-operative, registered in Switzerland, and provide tax, auditing and consulting services to corporations and governments.

Dennis Howlett, executive director of Canadians for Tax Fairness, says he would like to see KPMG executives who were directly involved in the Isle of Man scheme address the committee and is concerned about a possible "whitewash" if that doesn't happen.

The decision to launch hearings came in March, after CBC News revealed the CRA offered a secret amnesty to wealthy KPMG clients involved in the firm's tax scheme based out of the Isle of Man, a self-governing so-called possession of the British Crown located in the Irish Sea between Ireland and the U.K.

The offer, leaked to CBC News in a brown envelope, allowed the wealthy clients to pay taxes on the income they previously had not declared, plus some modest interest, and promised no civil penalties and no criminal investigations. The tax agency's offer came with a strict condition that clients never talk about it in public.

The committee has yet to vote on an NDP motion brought forth at the meeting asking Wiebe to identify any clients who may have broken the law.

Later in question period, the NDP's Tom Mulcair called on the Liberal government to launch an investigation, saying "Canadians don't accept there is one law for the rich and well connected and one law for everybody else."

But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rebuffed the demand. "Once again, we see NDP is always eager to play procedure games rather than dig into real issues. We're working with CRA, we're ensuring all Canadians and companies pay their fair share of taxes."


KPMG official tells MPs firm no longer in tax-shelter business - Politics - CBC News
 
tay
#29
Confidential details of more than 200,000 offshore accounts in the Panama Papers — including the names of at least 625 Canadians — have been released, in the hope that public scrutiny of the material will generate hundreds of tips about possible corruption and tax dodging.

The new information is in this searchable database (external - login to view),

CBC News and the Toronto Star, who have exclusive access in Canada to the leaked data, will be publishing a series of stories on Canadians named in it. Those include an examination of a lawyer who was known as a "go to" for wealthy people hoping to move money offshore, and of a convicted fraudster who set up 60 corporations in various tax havens.

It is not illegal for Canadians to have an offshore account, but any income must be reported for tax purposes, as well as any offshore assets totalling more than $100,000. Offshore jurisdictions like the Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, Isle of Man or Liechtenstein often have strict confidentiality rules for bank accounts and shell companies that make it easier to hide assets from tax authorities.

The ICIJ's Ryle said his organization hopes members of the public will scour the new Panama Papers data and flag any potential malfeasance they spot.
 
Walter
+4
#30  Top Rated Post
If Canada had a sane tax policy no one would need to put their money in Panama.
 

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