Freedomland Want's Canada To Loosen Privacy Laws


tay
#1
The U.S. government is prodding Ottawa and some provinces to overhaul their privacy laws and allow Canadians’ personal data to be hosted on U.S. servers.


The OUSTR singled out two provinces, British Columbia and Nova Scotia, for their privacy laws that prohibit the export of personal data by government agencies.




But while governments can avoid sensitive data moving through U.S. servers, most Canadians don’t have the same luxury. Some 90 per cent of Canadian internet traffic is routed through the U.S. (external - login to view)


The head of the Canadian Internet Registration Authority, which administers the .ca domain, has suggested Canada build its own internet exchange points to avoid U.S. surveillance (external - login to view).


The issue of cloud-based storage of personal data has raised concerns for years among some Canadian privacy experts. Many point to the controversial USA Patriot Act, the 2001 law passed in the wake of 9/11 that greatly expanded the U.S. government’s ability to monitor communications.


According to OUSTR documents recently obtained by the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (external - login to view), major U.S. corporations have complained to trade representatives about Canadian privacy laws.


Canadian officials were reportedly reluctant to allow data storage in the U.S. due to "privacy concerns stemming from the Patriot Act."


However, recent revelations about Canada’s cooperation with U.S. electronic surveillance (see here (external - login to view), here (external - login to view) and here (external - login to view)) have made some privacy experts question whether Canadians’ data is safe from prying U.S. eyes even in Canada.


The European Parliament issued a report earlier this year calling for a review of data-sharing with Canada, which it said was “involved on a large scale in mass surveillance of electronic communications” and may have co-operated with the U.S. on surveillance of EU citizens.




more


U.S. Pushes Canada To Loosen Privacy Laws (external - login to view)
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
I'm amazed that this is even an issue.

Gvt controlled personal data should be maintained directly by the gvt in their own equipment and infrastructure.

I can't imagine how fast that info would be commoditized by others followed immediately with hundreds of nuisance calls
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#3
i think taht is the whole point. Data mining is big business and companies want to know all about you so the can direct the right marketing stratagy to you. i don't care who knows what prescriptions I might have but I do care if some pill pusher uses thst info to direct advertizing to my email.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#4
It's none of their damn business.. End of story.

Mind you, I do get a kick out of the refusal to allow Canadian resource companies to operate in their jurisdiction (read; KXL), but they scream like scalded cats when something that is clearly a (personal) security issue is denied
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

I'm amazed that this is even an issue.

Gvt controlled personal data should be maintained directly by the gvt in their own equipment and infrastructure.

Do you mean like a government owned laptop or portable hard drive?

Lol, I don't particularly trust the government with this information either. Because when the do fuk up, it tends to be rather colossal.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Do you mean like a government owned laptop or portable hard drive?

Lol, I don't particularly trust the government with this information either. Because when the do fuk up, it tends to be rather colossal.


Are you under the impression that it is only Cdn gvt officials that lose laptops or memory sticks?
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Are you under the impression that it is only Cdn gvt officials that lose laptops or memory sticks?

Don't forget files left on girlfriend's kitchen counters too.

But no, not at all, lol. Just suggesting they aren't any more trustworthy.

Don't want privacy laws loosened, just don't really think they do all that much to begin with.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#8
Do you think we should go back to physical paper files and warehouses of filing cabinets?
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Do you think we should go back to physical paper files and warehouses of filing cabinets?

Are you channeling Petros this morning? Lol.

But no, I don't. I'm actually an advocate of a more paperless world, but although I tend to be fairly comfortable in an online environment I also realize that it's grown leaps and bounds beyond what ever kind of real thought I'd put into it before. Just giving it all some extra thought lately.

I mean, you come home and lock your door and that used to be enough but there is another way into our homes now, through our online connections (computers, cell phones, even some basic items like televisions, DVD players, refrigerators). Now the threat level may be fairly low (possibly) but I'd wager that most people don't even think about what may be available or going out without their knowledge or who might be getting in.

The other day I was browsing some accounting software and was taken aback by just how much is being pushed to be done completely web based. Not just software but data storage (everything is in the cloud these days right?). So I've just been thinking a lot about how much more of an understanding I need to have about all of this, because I may "get it" but I'm not sure I understand it well enough for my liking.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#10
My beef is that in outsourcing your personal information to a third party in another nation is just a bad idea from the get-go.

Any leak of that info (accidental I'm sure) results in what, exactly?... Tied up in the International Courts that haven't been able to rectify a myriad of issues related to things like NAFTA?

This isn't an issue of using technology or not, it's all about who is controlling your info
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

My beef is that in outsourcing your personal information to a third party in another nation is just a bad idea from the get-go.

Any leak of that info (accidental I'm sure) results in what, exactly?... Tied up in the International Courts that haven't been able to rectify a myriad of issues related to things like NAFTA?

This isn't an issue of using technology or not, it's all about who is controlling your info

Of course it's a bad idea in the sense that they're talking about in the article. And I'm not really talking about whether people utilize technology or not either, I'm saying the technology is there whether we are "using" it or not and the information is therefore available. And I'm not sure that many individuals are really taking the time to analyze what info is really out there or readily available.

I guess what I'm getting at is whether we/government make a choice to outsource personal information to a third party or not, that information is going to be out there in the hands of third party individuals in whatever nation because society is moving at a rapid pace into an online world that few of us are probably adequately prepared for. Now we can not help that along, sure I'd agree with that, but I believe we collectively have to do a big re-think about things like privacy and personal information and the security of both.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#12
Keeping the info in-house allows for a greater degree of control.

Can you imagine the number of unsolicited calls and emails that you'd be getting?.. It's bad enough now (despite the no-call registry), I can only imagine the amount of time I will waste dealing with, voicemails and emails that will clog my tech that originate from the US (or foreign subsidiaries) when the 'accidental breech' occurs.

Hell, and we haven't even touched on the personal part yet
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Keeping the info in-house allows for a greater degree of control.

Can you imagine the number of unsolicited calls and emails that you'd be getting?.. It's bad enough now (despite the no-call registry), I can only imagine the amount of time I will waste dealing with, voicemails and emails that will clog my tech that originate from the US (or foreign subsidiaries) when the 'accidental breech' occurs.

Hell, and we haven't even touched on the personal part yet

Yes, I don't disagree with that at all. Unsolicited calls and emails are things I find almost "offensive", to me it's the equivalent of someone walking into my home and trying to sell me something. My feeling is like "get the hell out of my house"! I think for as long as we can maintain some degree of control, we absolutely should. I just question how much control we actually truly have. I think it may be, or at least very soon may be, a false sense of security.
 

Similar Threads

1
Canada's Infertility Laws Futile
by Bar Sinister | Dec 14th, 2010
0
Canada near top in Privacy Poll.
by DurkaDurka | Nov 2nd, 2006
no new posts