From a Conservative: Our Government is failing our Veterans


Retired_Can_Soldier
+5
#1  Top Rated Post
I'm the conservative. The Harper Government is failing miserably with our veterans past and present and while it is not completely their fault, it is a broken promise. I don't care how much it cost, if we are going to call upon our soldiers and send them into harms way it is our responsibility to be there when they need us.

Sadly, while the other two parties are attempting to score points on this, the fact is that they will be just as lethargic. Canadians should hang their heads in shame for ignoring the present state of affairs.

Veterans fighting service cuts felt disrespected at Fantino meeting - Politics - CBC News
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#2
I'm of two minds on this. I don't want to see needed services to veterans but at the same time I would like to see a serious reduction in the number of bureaucrats that feed off the process.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+2
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

I'm of two minds on this. I don't want to see needed services to veterans but at the same time I would like to see a serious reduction in the number of bureaucrats that feed off the process.

The process could be sorted out if we got rid of that quasi judicial kangaroo court in Charlottetown called the Veterans appeal Board. They answer to no one and have been screwing veterans for decades.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

The process could be sorted out if we got rid of that quasi judicial kangaroo court in Charlottetown called the Veterans appeal Board. They answer to no one and have been screwing veterans for decades.

Step one.
 
mentalfloss
#5
RCS voting NDP in the next election confirmed.
 
Goober
Free Thinker
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

RCS voting NDP in the next election confirmed.

The mess of the New Veterans Charter was approved by all Members sitting. Not one Nay vote.

The Feds had an est cost future for health care, benefits for wounded Vets of 5/6 Billion plus.
And this was in 2005.
 
petros
+1
#7
If Harper dresses up like he's going fly fishing and says he is 100% behind the troops would they believe him again?
 
Goober
Free Thinker
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

If Harper dresses up like he's going fly fishing and says he is 100% behind the troops would they believe him again?

We all stopped believing years ago.
 
petros
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

We all stopped believing years ago.

Far too many haven't caught on yet.
 
Colpy
Conservative
+5
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I'm the conservative. The Harper Government is failing miserably with our veterans past and present and while it is not completely their fault, it is a broken promise. I don't care how much it cost, if we are going to call upon our soldiers and send them into harms way it is our responsibility to be there when they need us.

Sadly, while the other two parties are attempting to score points on this, the fact is that they will be just as lethargic. Canadians should hang their heads in shame for ignoring the present state of affairs.

Veterans fighting service cuts felt disrespected at Fantino meeting - Politics - CBC News

All too true.

This is simply unacceptable.

I loathe Julian Fantino...........I did long before he went into politics.

The Harper gov't could start by kicking his useless arrogant unethical **** out of cabinet completely.
Last edited by Colpy; Jan 29th, 2014 at 12:51 PM..
 
Goober
Free Thinker
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

All too true.

This is simply unacceptable.

I loathe Julian Fantino...........I did long before he went into politics.

The Harper gov't copuld start by kicking his useless arrogant unethical **** out of cabinet completely.

He is a floater, if you catch the drift.
 
Machjo
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I'm the conservative. The Harper Government is failing miserably with our veterans past and present and while it is not completely their fault, it is a broken promise. I don't care how much it cost, if we are going to call upon our soldiers and send them into harms way it is our responsibility to be there when they need us.

Sadly, while the other two parties are attempting to score points on this, the fact is that they will be just as lethargic. Canadians should hang their heads in shame for ignoring the present state of affairs.

Veterans fighting service cuts felt disrespected at Fantino meeting - Politics - CBC News


B... b... but while we appreciate the sacrifice our veterans have done, are you now asking for a moderate sacrifice on the part of taxpayers?

For shame? (I'm being sarcastic of course)
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+2
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

RCS voting NDP in the next election confirmed.

I am what you would call a swing voter.
 
mentalfloss
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I am what you would call a swing voter.

This looks like another opportunity for Shiny Pony.
 
Machjo
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I am what you would call a swing voter.

I don't swing. I just vote for the best local candidate.
 
petros
+3
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I am what you would call a swing voter.

I vote for an MP not a PM.
 
Machjo
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

I vote for an MP not a PM.

Well said. And I don't hold my Mp to his party, but rather to principle.
 
BornRuff
+1
#18
Veterans Affairs is clearly a broken system.

That being said, should we really have an entire bureaucracy to serve one subset of the population? Dealing with anything that arises directly from military service should be part and parcel of what the Armed Forces does, as other employers are responsible for harm caused to their employees.

Beyond that, our government should be working to provide respectful and dignified treatment for all Canadians, not just a select few who went into a certain field of work.
 
Goober
Free Thinker
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by BornRuffView Post

Veterans Affairs is clearly a broken system.

That being said, should we really have an entire bureaucracy to serve one subset of the population? Dealing with anything that arises directly from military service should be part and parcel of what the Armed Forces does, as other employers are responsible for harm caused to their employees.

Beyond that, our government should be working to provide respectful and dignified treatment for all Canadians, not just a select few who went into a certain field of work.

I went before a review board for an injury. These 2 that were on the board listen to your evidence as presented.
Explaining my duties, and how the injury occurred and such I mentioned the word rucksack.

One, the civilian an appointee asked my what a rucksack was.
True story.
Oh yes, the other was a retired Navy Admiral. Now he knows a ton about army life.
 
WLDB
No Party Affiliation
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

I'm of two minds on this. I don't want to see needed services to veterans but at the same time I would like to see a serious reduction in the number of bureaucrats that feed off the process.

The two arent mutually exclusive.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+1
#21
I don't vote anymore. The veterens took an oath to defend this country and the banks that own it, they are bound by patriotic duty to continue to bleed for the fatherland, the country needs every dollar it can get for the people at the front, we can't afford to loose this war, please help save the endangered feces below.

Davos groupthink dangerously out of touch

Davos groupthink dangerously out of touch ? RT Op-Edge


The Annual Plutocrats Ski Week ended at Davos last weekend. Once again opinions were dangerously uniform.
A private jet exodus has befallen Zurich Kloten and Samedan St Moritz, (an airport dedicated to ‘PJs’) as 2500 plutocrats presumably consider it another successful World Economic Forum.
When it comes to talking shop, few come more expensive than the $70,000 WEF delegate fee (equivalent to almost 1.5 times the average annual American household income). Conference topics often infer this exclusive grouping are in touch with ‘normal’ people. Rather the deportment and discussions of “Davos Man” (& woman) demonstrate an altogether more worrying tendency: dull linear groupthink. The polar opposite of the global leadership this conference smugly proclaims.
After all, in 2008 the world’s corporate titans proclaimed resilient economic growth. Within months various delegates were ‘running’ clearly bankrupt entities. Fortunately, those 70k tickets were worth something as governments rapidly supported their banker brethren with shockingly irresponsible bailouts to reward some shockingly irresponsible lending. (To be ‘fair’ to the bankers, government agencies like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, were shockingly complicit in lending profligacy).
Governments of left and right united to create a crony corporate socialism. Just like communism, an oligarchy were protected from their irrational exuberance, subsidized (without consent) by ordinary citizens’ taxes.
These insidious links between an unholy oligarchical trinity of multinational corporations, politicians and NGOs have helped Davos develop into a hotbed of dangerous global groupthink. An overlay of aging rockers and sundry celebrities espousing ‘good’ causes sprinkles some stardust amongst the ‘suits’. but adds little contrasting thought to the prevailing politically correct doctrine of big corporations / government / NGOs. Meanwhile, the irony of chartering private jets to protest about global warming by visiting an obscure Swiss mountain peak is somehow lost on self-important celebrity delegates.
Ultimately messages from Davos resemble the finale of a Mozart opera - a cast singing some moralistic homily in unison which is frequently far removed from any sense of reality.

Reuters / Arnd Wiegmann

This year’s delegate message has been one of cautious optimism - which can be translated as corporations thanking gullible governments for feeding the old economy with vast bailout subsidies, including the “funny money” of Quantitative Easing. Yes, even the Davos classes have ended up as welfare junkies. The net result is a travesty of cronyism, driven by consensual groupthink incapable of identifying lateral solutions. True, Schumpeterian “creative destruction” is often ugly but its force must occasionally be unleashed to renew the economy. Banks ought to have been the first to feel that force in 2008.
Creative destruction is the antithesis of the corporatized socialist mindset practiced at Davos where the caretakers of big business are eager to extrapolate what they already have and largely incapable, or unwilling, to evaluate the future creatively. This year one innovation subjected to concerted criticism was bitcoin. In an unedifying example of Davos’ reactionary protectionist tendency, JP Morgan boss Jamie Dimon readily concurred with US Treasury Secretary Jack Lew about the evils of cryptocurrency. With a characteristic Davos irony bypass, Mr Lew railed against bitcoin facilitating crime: A curious stance given more drug dealing takes place in dollars every fortnight than the entire value of bitcoin! The WEF was once again in the vanguard of reaction.
The oddest facet to the entire Davos concept is the dubious extrapolation that those who run businesses are adept at solving political problems. Asking a clutch of multinational CEOs to ameliorate income imbalance is a fallacy, akin to asking a convention of footballers to progress nanotechnology or a beauty pageant to improve skyscraper construction. CEOs should stick to what they know: running businesses, where they deliver growth, create jobs and hence raise everybody’s wealth. Giving executives political influence merely encourages their egos to emulate the celebrities. Resulting ‘solutions’ usually amount to endless platitudes mouthed by a ‘suit’ primed by legions of PR staff.
Ultimately Davos is a product of these stagnant times - a phoney capitalist-socialist mish mash. The world needs individual empowerment, not more top down policy that is outmoded before it is implemented. With globalization a fact of digital life, we need to educate workers with the flexible skills to prosper in an interconnected world. It is small business and start-ups which need to be unshackled from suffocating pro-corporatist regulations designed by sprawling crony committees. Incredible prosperity awaits through further technological innovation, but first we must prevent the reactionary protectionist Davos man mindset suffocating our individual abilities. Growth will only come from the bottom, not the snowy peaks of Davos groupthink.
The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.


 
Goober
Free Thinker
#22
He was late due to a Cabinet meeting. Does Harper really need Dumbos input.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

The two arent mutually exclusive.

From my experience with DND cutting the bureaucracy would improve the service.
 
Goober
Free Thinker
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

From my experience with DND cutting the bureaucracy would improve the service.

Problem is dealing with Vets and medical conditions. It takes time to know what is what.
And Vets get pensions, grants etc due to medical conditions.
 
petros
+2
#25
If I wore fly fishing gear to a combat area would you believe me if I said 'I've got you back"?
 
relic
Free Thinker
+1
#26
Steve promised a balanced budget and he'll get one by god no matter how deep he has to cut or who has to suffer {as long as it's not any of his "base"} It's nice to see a few of you are finally getting the message, took long enough.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+2 / -1
#27
Harper hates the Canadian military and wants to cripple it to avoid eventual arrest by that same loyal military.
 
El Barto
+2
#28
Since when were veterans truly appreciated by any government, even in the states?
 
tay
+1
#29
Harper's support for veterans: wear a poppy. do nothing else.






These Canadian veterans feel they deserve more. From The National Post, Canada's most conservative newspaper:
Disabled veterans, widows slam Harper government ahead of Remembrance Day

Disabled veterans and military widows are unleashing a broadside of frustration against the Harper government just before Remembrance Day, saying they’re feeling abandoned and left to fend for themselves.

They have gathered on Parliament Hill to paint a stark picture of bureaucratic indifference and red tape that flies in the face of reassurances from the government, which says the care of military families is a top priority.

Few of the government’s touted programs meant to help combat veterans find civilian jobs actually help the disabled, complained retired master corporal Dave Desjardins, who is paralyzed from the waist down.

Desjardins said he was proud to serve his country.

“What I’m not proud of, however, is how our government officials and senior military leadership can look directly into the camera (and) speak to the Canadian public about honouring our veterans at this time of year with implied conviction when they’ve clearly turned their back on us and continue to demonstrate (that) on a daily basis,” said Desjardins.

He challenged Veterans Affairs Minister Steven Blaney to look him in the eye “and tell me you really care.”

The government recently threw its weight behind a so-called “helmets-to-hardhats” program, which aids ex-soldiers get into the construction industry — a wonderful resource for someone without physical limitations, said Desjardins.

A number of officials “in expensive suits” are on the record as saying there are a number of opportunities for disabled veterans, but Desjardins said many of the head hunters discriminate in favour of officers, leaving non-commissioned members out in the cold.

“I’m here to ask those suits one simple question: Show me. Show me where those opportunities and jobs are — and I’m not just asking for myself, I'm also asking for the hundreds of other disabled veterans across Canada.”

Tracy Kerr, wife of a triple amputee who fought in Afghanistan, said she and her family have battled for years to get basic needs, such as a lift to get her husband in and out of the bathtub.

“I’ve travelled seven hours to speak to the public about how we’re struggling,” said Kerr, from Sudbury, Ont., her eyes filling with tears as she spoke.

“I just want a quality of life, happiness for my family and when we make requests for his needs, to get them.”

Jackie Girouard, whose husband was killed by a roadside bomb in Kandahar in 2006, said the families of many soldiers are denied access to the veterans independence program, which helps with yard work and light housekeeping.

She said policies which set time limits on accepting assistance, such as two years for education and job retraining, are insensitive and unrealistic.

“I was with my husband for 31 years, and I make no apologies for how long it took to me to get this far without my husband,” she said.

“They could’ve said to me: ’Jackie, take your time and when you’re ready come see us and we’ll work together to help you achieve you and your family’s goals.’ Those words alone would have demonstrated to me that you care. Those words would have demonstrated to me that you understood and it was not just about money or policies.”

Ex-soldiers say much of the dissatisfaction can be traced back to the 2006 New Veterans Charter, which overhauled the way ex-soldiers are compensated.

For many of the wounded, the government has moved away from a pension-for-life system into a workers compensation-style lump-sum payment, a process that is now the subject of a class-action lawsuit.




Same paper, September 23:




The Harper government spent $750,462 in legal fees fighting veterans over the clawback of military pensions, documents tabled in Parliament show.

Federal Liberals have been demanding to see a breakdown of Ottawa’s legal costs in the class-action lawsuit launched by veterans advocate Dennis Manuge, of Halifax.

The response was tabled in Parliament last week, but Justice Minister Rob Nicholson refused to release an itemized count, invoking solicitor-client privilege.

Instead, he released a global amount for the lawsuit, which has been dragging its way through the courts since March 2007.

Liberal veterans critic Sean Casey described the legal bill as an “obscene waste of taxpayers’ money.




more




Tories spent more than $750,000 fighting veterans’ pension claim | National Post
 
Nuggler
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

All too true.

This is simply unacceptable.

I loathe Julian Fantino...........I did long before he went into politics.

The Harper gov't could start by kicking his useless arrogant unethical **** out of cabinet completely.




There's lots about him to loathe, Colpy. Makes me wanna puke. Always did.
 
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