Harper spends 2.5M on Non- existent program


mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1
The economic guru dazzles us again.


Canada Job Grant ads cost $2.5M for non-existent program

The federal government blanketed the internet with ads and bought pricey TV spots during playoff hockey as part a $2.5-million publicity blitz to promote a skills training program that doesn't yet exist, CBC News has learned.

TV commercials for the Canada Job Grant often ran twice per game last May during the widely watched Hockey Night in Canada NHL playoff broadcasts on CBC. There were ads on radio, as well.

“The Canada Job Grant will result in one important thing – a new or better job,” said the reassuring voice-over in the TV ads.

The problem: The program was never launched and is still on hold. The job grants were announced in the 2013 federal budget, but it called for an agreement with the provinces, which have so far refused to buy in.

Employment and Social Development Canada spent between $2.5 million and $2.6 million on the ad campaign. That figure excludes radio ads funded by the Finance Department.

“Spending millions of dollars to advertise a program that doesn't even exist is like flushing tax dollars down the toilet,” Liberal finance critic Scott Brison said.

Canada Job Grant ads cost $2.5M for non-existent program
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
+2
#2
Iis is worse it is totally deceptive they knew there was no program so what YOU paid
for was two and a half million dollars for nothing more than propaganda.
It was window dressing and totally dishonest and no one batted an eye.
 
BornRuff
+3
#3
We really need to put a stop to this at all levels of government. Ontario already has a law in place to prevent public money being spent on partisan or misleading ads. Nobody in the Ontario government can spend a penny of public money on advertising before it is vetted by the auditor general. The Feds definitely need to adopt this too.
 
petros
+2
#4
Put a complaint into the Ministry of Transparency.
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
+1
#5
I'm surprised there isn't more news on this.

All the fiscal conservatives have gone silent.
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#6
Well that's a relief.

Misleading job grant ads fell on deaf ears anyway: survey | canada.com
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#7
I wonder if all $2.5M was delivered in one big brown bag, or a bunch of small ones.
 
grumpydigger
+5
#8  Top Rated Post
A $2.5 million Dollar fraud and it barely sparks the interest of the Canadian citizens

Harpo has moved on , to closing libraries burning books and firing scientists who do not conform to his version of propaganda.

Too bad we can't confront him about it, because he refuses to answer questions unless he's been told what they are before hand



It's a nice little fascist state Canada has become.
 
petros
#9
Quote:

Harpo has moved on , to closing libraries burning books and firing scientists who do not conform to his version of propaganda.

All the redundancy should be burned now the antiquated scientists are free to work in the Provincial and private labs for twice the money.
 
grumpydigger
+1
#10
Of course, heil Harpo
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by grumpydiggerView Post

A $2.5 million Dollar fraud and it barely sparks the interest of the Canadian citizens

Harpo has moved on , to closing libraries burning books and firing scientists who do not conform to his version of propaganda.

Too bad we can't confront him about it, because he refuses to answer questions unless he's been told what they are before hand



It's a nice little fascist state Canada has become.


Don't forget the concentration camps.. There are bound to be concentration camps
 
petros
#12
Scientists who only know how to use a computer for email have no place in a modern world.
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#13
Is that like the bidding war our well-informed but double-talking government hoped for in wireless technology?

Canada's Wireless Policy: More choice. Lower prices. Better service. - Industry Canada
 
Christianna
No Party Affiliation
+2
#14
I call that campaigning.....oh and should be illegal as well.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#15
The adds did produce some jobs in advertizing and acting. Overall the cost per job was probably about the same as any other government job creation project.
 
Nuggler
#16
How much did the non reported crime cost ??
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1 / -1
#17
Quit picking on Harper!
 
petros
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

Quit picking on Harper!

No!!l
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#19
Don't you just love unilateral decisions?

They're so tasty!


Provinces remain united over Canada Job Grant concerns

Provincial and territorial labour ministers emerged from a teleconference call Friday afternoon united in their position that the Canada Job Grant, a new skills training program scheduled to come into effect on April 1, should not come at the expense of existing training programs for Canada's most vulnerable workers.

The provinces don't want Ottawa to cut from existing Labour Market Agreements (LMA) that provide skills training for young adults, aboriginal people, new immigrants, older workers, people with disabilities and other groups who are under-represented in the workforce and looking for work.

In a letter sent today to Employment Minister Jason Kenney, and obtained by CBC News, P.E.I. Innovation Minister Allen Roach said, "Ministers are united in their concerns and expressed disappointment that you continue to propose to fund the Canada Job Grant through substantial cuts to LMA programs."

The ministers responsible for overseeing the new federal plan will be sending Kenney a counter-proposal following Friday's call, the letter said.

Kenney's office released a statement in response late Friday, saying the federal government has listened to the provinces' concerns and "significantly restructured the offer based on their feedback.

"We hope to receive a formal counter-offer from the provinces shortly, and we hope provincial governments show a willingness to also be flexible in these negotiations. We remain prepared to deliver the Canada Job Grant ourselves if an agreement with the provinces is not met," the statement said.

Differing views on transfers
While the federal government may have shown some flexibility regarding the money provinces were required to match for the Canada Job Grant program, it has not budged on one of the main sticking points, which is a reduction in federal transfers, Ontario's Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities told CBC News going into the call with his counterparts.

"We still remain very concerned that the federal government is still asking us to take — $300 million across the country and in Ontario alone $116 million — out of our programs that fund our most vulnerable workers to put towards this untested and untried Canada Job Grant."

Duguid said he was going to share Ontario's position during a teleconference with his provincial and territorial counterparts Friday when they gathered to discuss a revised proposal sent to them Kenney at the end of December.

Provincial and territorial labour ministers emerged from a teleconference call Friday afternoon united in their position that the Canada Job Grant, a new skills training program scheduled to come into effect on April 1, should not come at the expense of existing training programs for Canada's most vulnerable workers.

The provinces don't want Ottawa to cut from existing Labour Market Agreements (LMA) that provide skills training for young adults, aboriginal people, new immigrants, older workers, people with disabilities and other groups who are under-represented in the workforce and looking for work.

In a letter sent today to Employment Minister Jason Kenney, and obtained by CBC News, P.E.I. Innovation Minister Allen Roach said, "Ministers are united in their concerns and expressed disappointment that you continue to propose to fund the Canada Job Grant through substantial cuts to LMA programs."

Read the provinces' letter to Jason Kenney
Read Jason Kenney's response
The ministers responsible for overseeing the new federal plan will be sending Kenney a counter-proposal following Friday's call, the letter said.

Kenney's office released a statement in response late Friday, saying the federal government has listened to the provinces' concerns and "significantly restructured the offer based on their feedback.

"We hope to receive a formal counter-offer from the provinces shortly, and we hope provincial governments show a willingness to also be flexible in these negotiations. We remain prepared to deliver the Canada Job Grant ourselves if an agreement with the provinces is not met," the statement said.

Differing views on transfers
While the federal government may have shown some flexibility regarding the money provinces were required to match for the Canada Job Grant program, it has not budged on one of the main sticking points, which is a reduction in federal transfers, Ontario's Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities told CBC News going into the call with his counterparts.

"We still remain very concerned that the federal government is still asking us to take — $300 million across the country and in Ontario alone $116 million — out of our programs that fund our most vulnerable workers to put towards this untested and untried Canada Job Grant."

Duguid said he was going to share Ontario's position during a teleconference with his provincial and territorial counterparts Friday when they gathered to discuss a revised proposal sent to them Kenney at the end of December.

'Our major concerns in many cases are still very much left unaddressed.'-— Brad Duguid, Ontario minister of training, colleges and universities
The Canada Job Grant plan, as it was introduced in last year's federal budget, would have provided up to $15,000 per worker toward skills training to find a new or better job, with the provinces and employers matching the government's contribution of $5,000.

Kenney made a concession by offering to pay the provinces' share up to $10,000 of the job grant with employers kicking in the other $5,000.

"We're pleased the federal government has responded to make some changes. However, our major concerns in many cases are still very much left unaddressed," Duguid said.

That's because the revised offer doesn't compromise on a reduction in federal transfers.

The provinces currently receive $500 million a year in funding from Ottawa for training under-represented groups, under existing labour market agreements that are set to expire on March 31. The Canada Job Grant program would see the provinces lose close to $300 million or nearly 60 per cent of Ottawa's contribution through the agreements.

"In effect, many of those training programs would have to be eliminated likely altogether if this would go forward as it is," Duguid said.

The federal government points out that although growth in the transfers to the provinces has slowed, it is still going up.

Provinces favour more flexibility
It was believed the provinces would have been able to divert federal money from a fund used to train unemployed Canadians, who are eligible for employment insurance, and use it to train low-skilled workers looking to enter the workforce.

But that no longer appears to be the case, Duguid said.

"We have confirmed with the federal government that no, we will not have the flexibility of covering in Ontario's case that $116 million through the Labour Market Development Agreement as opposed to the Labour Market Agreement."

"The areas of flexibility they've talked about so far are extremely marginal and not particularly helpful. That is something that is certainly up for discussion," Duguid said.

A senior federal government source told CBC News on Friday that under the revised plan, the provinces will be able to divert a good chunk of the funds from one envelope to another.

“The provinces have been offered the flexibility to cover a significant portion of the funds for the Canada Job Grant from the Labour Market Development Agreement."

Today's call was meant as an opportunity for the provinces and territories to gauge how far apart they still are with the federal government on the controversial Canada Job Grant program.

Roach, the P.E.I. minister, told CBC News in an interview on Thursday that the provinces and territories will be discussing the impact of the cuts to their funding.

"We'll be discussing each and every one of those points and seeing whether we feel it's moved far enough," Roach said.

"Once we finish that call, then we'll be in a better position, as one voice, to get back to Minister Kenney and give him our feedback, which he is waiting for."

Roach and Kenney are co-chairs of the Forum of Labour Market Ministers, a group that meets regularly to discuss labour market matters.

Provinces remain united over Canada Job Grant concerns
 
Simple Man
Free Thinker
#20
Once I tried to estimate a nice round number to use in correlating how many people paid into the tax system all their lives and what that represented compared to various headlines regarding government spending with dollar figures attached. I have been using 500,000 as a lifetime of tax contributions, hence, 5 individuals contributed their whole life by way of taxes so that a non existent program could be developed.

Do you think 500,000 is a fair estimate?
 
tay
+1
#21









Taxpayers spent $14.8-million last year promoting “Canada’s Economic Action Plan,” a catchphrase first created by the Conservative government to promote stimulus spending that ended nearly two years ago.


A report on ad spending obtained by The Globe and Mail shows last year’s totals came in about $5-million higher than what Treasury Board had previously listed as the approved advertising budget. The Conservative government faces continued criticism this year that it is pushing the boundaries of self-promotion at taxpayer expense, spending $2.5-million to advertise a job grant that does not yet exist and recently launching a weekly video of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s activities.




Government spends millions on ads for 'Economic Action Plan' that ended two years ago - The Globe and Mail
 
relic
Free Thinker
#22
And weeks after having said the adds were canceled{,because they were illegal}, there still on.Go figure eh.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by relicView Post

And weeks after having said the adds were canceled{,because they were illegal}, there still on.Go figure eh.

Maybe someone was paying for the ads with cash in brown paper bags. No receipts you understand

Remind you of anyone?
 
relic
Free Thinker
#24
That keeps rearing it's head but it seems no one is going to bite. The torys wore that fig out years ago .welcome to the new century.steve and his lackys have enough **** ups of their own now .
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#25
It's pretty disgusting when people try to validate a screw up by pointing the finger at someone else. Really shows a lack of responsibility and leadership.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by relicView Post

That keeps rearing it's head but it seems no one is going to bite. The torys wore that fig out years ago .welcome to the new century.steve and his lackys have enough **** ups of their own now .

Sounds to me like a double standard more than anything else.
 
tay
#27
Taxpayer group gives Teddy waste award for 'non-existent' job grant ads




Employment and Social Development Minister Jason Kenney, come on down!


You — or, at least, your department — just won this year's "Teddy" award for most egregious waste of federal government money, thanks to the $2.5 million spent on prime 2013 Stanley Cup ad placement for what the Canadian Taxpayers Federation describes as "the non-existent Canada Jobs Grant."


“If you jumped from your sofa during the Stanley Cup Playoffs in 2013 to alert your unemployed teenager about the fabulous new $15,000 Canada Jobs Grant, you were in for a sad surprise," the taxpayer watchdog group's Gregory Thomas said at an Ottawa press conference Wednesday.


"Despite $2.5 million in taxpayer-funded advertising — such as those slick TV commercials during the games — the Canada Jobs Grant didn’t exist, and still doesn’t. Maybe by the time the 2014 playoffs roll around the government will reach a deal with the provinces and Canada’s employers, and bring the Canada Jobs Grant into existence," Thomas said.


The Taxpayer's Federation award may have extra sting for Kenney, who once served as the group's president and chief executive officer.


In what has become an annual tongue-in-cheek tradition, the gold-plated trophies — shaped like pigs, of course — were handed out in absentia at a black-tie press conference, as the group's mascot, Porky the Waste-Hating Pig, looked on. The awards are named for Ted Weatherill, a former federal appointee who was fired in 1999 over expense claims that included a $700 lunch for two.


This year's recipients also included Toronto's former Pan-AM Games boss, Ian Troop, and Vancouver TransLink's $4.5-million empty parking lot, with a lifetime achievement award going — "after sober second thought" — to the Senate of Canada.


Troop won the provincial award for getting a salary of over $550,000 while overseeing an event that is $1.1 billion over budget. Troop's expense claims ranged from 91 cents for parking to a lavish $8,500 party in Mexico.


Runners-up included the Defence Department for commissioning a $14,000 public opinion poll to determine what Canadians see as the powers of super heroes and Hydro Quebec for paying unionized crane operators an estimated $1.92 million to stay off the job while crane operators from Germany did the actual work on a hydro project.


Not surprisingly, not one of the honourees turned up to accept their prizes




Taxpayer group gives Teddy waste award for 'non-existent' job grant ads - Politics - CBC News










 

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