Canadian immigration reforms


Tonington
+1
#1
I guess dumpthemonarchy must be predisposed doing something else to have missed this.

Immigration Minister Jason Kenny recently announced changes to our immigration program, specifically to bring in more with skilled trades. Canada is actually in absolute terms projected to have the fourth largest construction industry behind only the US, China, and India. With our demographic changes there are realities that needed to be addressed, and I think these changes will be positive.

It used to be that someone with a PhD would get preferred treatment by Immigration Canada, even if they might have difficulty finding work in their field. Now the changes will mean that tradespeople with jobs waiting for them will have a different route of access to citizenship.

To qualify: applicants will must meet the following four requirements:
  • They must have an offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory to ensure that applicants are “job ready” upon arrival;
  • They must meet a basic language requirement;
  • They must have a minimum of two years of work experience as a skilled tradesperson, to ensure that the applicant has recent and relevant practice as a qualified journeyman; and
  • They must have the skills and experience that match those set out in the National Occupational Classification (NOC B) system, showing that they have performed the essential duties of the occupation
With a critical shortage in trades people for the foreseeable future, this seems like a very good step in the right direction. While education is in the hands of the provinces, it would be probably a good idea also to get young people interested in trades at an earlier age, and develop co-op programs for students who see the opportunities in having a trade. Skills development in high school would be beneficial.

Other thoughts or concerns?
 
petros
+4
#2  Top Rated Post
Since their destination is the Prairies , a parka, boots, toque and mittens should have been a pre-entry requirment as well.
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

...They must have a minimum of two years of work experience as a skilled tradesperson, to ensure that the applicant has recent and relevant practice as a qualified journeyman; and....

That reads strangely to me. Very few (none that I'm aware of) Journeymen acheive
that status in a minimum of two years.
 
petros
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

That reads strangely to me. Very few (none that I'm aware of) Journeymen acheive
that status in a minimum of two years.

It's not just journeymen. We need nearly 300,000 workers on the Prairies yesterday.
 
Tonington
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

That reads strangely to me. Very few (none that I'm aware of) Journeymen acheive
that status in a minimum of two years.

I think you're reading it wrong. I think they're calling a skilled trades person a journeyman, and that they must have had their journeyman for at least two working years to be qualified under this program. None of my friends or relatives had their red seal in two years or less, that's for sure.
 
petros
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

I think you're reading it wrong. I think they're calling a skilled trades person a journeyman, and that they must have had their journeyman for at least two working years to be qualified under this program. None of my friends or relatives had their red seal in two years or less, that's for sure.

Nope. I heard Kenny give the speech.
 
wulfie68
No Party Affiliation
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

That reads strangely to me. Very few (none that I'm aware of) Journeymen acheive
that status in a minimum of two years.

In Alberta, there are programs (from NAIT, SAIT and a couple other schools) where you can do all the schooling for a trade in one lump session and then have to spend at least 2 years essentially as an apprentice to a journeyman to get a ticket. Normal apprenticeship (again in Alberta) to obtain journeyman status is 3 or 4 years (depending on the trade) with a 6-8 week school session each year.
 
Tonington
+1
#8
No to what Petros? Commas people, commas...

They must have a minimum of two years of work experience as a skilled tradesperson COMMA to ensure that the applicant has recent and relevant practice as a qualified journeyman

That doesn't mean they need to complete their apprenticeship in two years....that is insane. Nobody does that.
 
petros
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

No to what Petros? Commas people, commas...

They must have a minimum of two years of work experience as a skilled tradesperson COMMA to ensure that the applicant has recent and relevant practice as a qualified journeyman

That doesn't mean they need to complete their apprenticeship in two years....that is insane. Nobody does that.

Quote:

Instead, the new program will consider applicants who have a job offer in Canada, have a basic proficiency in English or French, can prove they have experience in an in-demand trade. They must also show that their occupation qualifies as a trade under federal regulations.

The need for skilled tradespeople is most dire in Alberta, where the province estimates that it will need an additional 115,000 skilled tradesworkers over the next 10 years.

Any questions? Charts or graphs?

Listen to Kenny in the interviews and speech..right from his mouth straight to your ears.

New federal immigration program to fill gap in skilled trades | CTV News (external - login to view)
 
china
Conservative
#10
[QUOTE

Immigration
Poland
Canada
Foreigners – so the bigoted adage goes – are "coming over here and stealing our jobs". Now it seems they are coming over here and stealing our immigrants. The Canadian government is courting Polish migrants living in Britain, in an attempt to persuade them to abandon our rainy shores in favour of a new life in Canada.

Canada is facing a shortage of labour, particularly in construction and transport, and hopes that Polish migrants from Britain will be easier to integrate than people coming directly from Poland because they already speak English. Canada's Immigration minister called a meeting with representatives of the Polish community at the Canadian High Commission in London last month, to discuss ways that Poles living in the UK could be poached. Canada plans to set up a trade show in Manchester next year, promoting the country's existing Polish community, and tempting the UK's Poles to move there.

On an official visit to England and Ireland, Jason Kenney boasted to Polish migrants: "Many of you would find a better job in Canada." He added that Canada also had a better economy, better social mobility and a lower cost of living than the UK.

In a speech to Polish expats in Ireland, Mr Kenney said: "The government of Canada is committed to building an immigration system that actively recruits talent rather than passively processing all applications that we receive. There are approximately 200,000 Poles living in Ireland, many with highly advanced skills in the trades needed in Canada's labour market."

There are already historical links between Poland and Canada, with around a million Canadians claiming Polish ancestry.

Włodek Mier-Jedrzejowicz, chairman of the UK Federation of Poles, said: "I got a call from someone in the Canadian ministry who said they were trying to make it easier for people to come and work in Canada, and arranged the meeting. He told me there is a large Polish community in Canada already and he's trying to make it easier for people to move. He's particularly keen on Polish people who have English skills.

"He said the Canadian economy was stronger than others since the banking sector did not invest in housing; and, because the economy is continuing to expand, they are looking for labour – for skilled workers for larger companies."

Bob Kozak, president of the Polish Society in Vancouver, said: "Canada is advertising an open door for Polish migrants and skilled workers. The Polish community here is huge, so it would be easy for people to settle in."

A spokesman for the Canadian government said: "Canada is building a fast and flexible economic immigration system whose primary focus is on meeting Canada's labour market needs. The government is exploring approaches to developing a pool of skilled workers who are ready to begin employment here."

Canada, he said, is facing shortages of workers in certain skilled trades. "Immigrants can help meet this need. There are over 200 trades, which generally fall under four main categories: construction, transportation, manufacturing and service. Forty to 50 per cent of skilled trade workers," he added, "are within the construction sector."
Last edited by china; Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:19 PM..
 
china
Conservative
#11
Jason Kenney to relaunch skilled worker immigration program in May



Photograph by: Chris Wattie, REUTERS , Postmedia News
OTTAWA – The federal government will reopen its largest immigration program with a new focus on accepting skilled workers who are young and can speak either English or French, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney announced Wednesday.

The Federal Skilled Worker Program was frozen in June pending changes to the points grid used to select newcomers.

The government is seeking to make youth and language proficiency a bigger priority for both principal applicants and their spouses.

Under the new system, the government will also award more points for Canadian work experience and would-be newcomers will have to have their education credentials assessed before arriving in Canada.

“The new Federal Skilled Worker Program criteria will ensure Canada is selecting the skilled immigrants our economy needs, who are the most likely to succeed and fully realize their potential in Canada,” Kenney said in a statement.

“For too long, too many immigrants to Canada have experienced underemployment and unemployment, and this has been detrimental to these newcomers and to the Canadian economy. Our transformational changes to the (program) will help ensure that skilled newcomers are able to contribute their skills fully to the economy as soon as possible. This is good for newcomers, good for the economy, and good for all Canadians.”

The freeze has also allowed the government to get a grip on about 100,000 backlogged skilled worker applications that remained after some 280,000 pre-2008 applications from skilled workers and their dependents were eliminated in the last budget.

The government is refunding $130 million in application fees as part of an ongoing process. The plan, however, is being challenged in court.

That said, between the moratorium on new federal skilled worker applications and the budget decision to toss old applications, the government indicated last month that the remaining backlog would be eliminated by 2014, about three years ahead of schedule.

When the program relaunches May 4, 2013, it’s expected that new applications will be processed within months rather than years, Kenney said, adding he will also cap the number of applications the government will accept annually to avoid more backlogs in the future.

tcohen(at)postmedia.com



Read more: Jason Kenney to relaunch skilled worker immigration program in May
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

I guess dumpthemonarchy must be predisposed doing something else to have missed this.
Immigration Minister Jason Kenny recently announced changes to our immigration program, specifically to bring in more with skilled trades. Canada is actually in absolute terms projected to have the fourth largest construction industry behind only the US, China, and India. With our demographic changes there are realities that needed to be addressed, and I think these changes will be positive.
It used to be that someone with a PhD would get preferred treatment by Immigration Canada, even if they might have difficulty finding work in their field. Now the changes will mean that tradespeople with jobs waiting for them will have a different route of access to citizenship.
To qualify: applicants will must meet the following four requirements: They must have an offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory to ensure that applicants are “job ready” upon arrival;
They must meet a basic language requirement;
They must have a minimum of two years of work experience as a skilled tradesperson, to ensure that the applicant has recent and relevant practice as a qualified journeyman; and

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
Should have been done a decade or so ago. I remember a few times back then reading about predictions that Canada will need more skilled tradespeople. It was lost on gov't, though. Gov'ts seem to recognize problems in their later stages and then sit on them for years, then ponder them for years, before finally doing something about them.
 
china
Conservative
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Should have been done a decade or so ago. I remember a few times back then reading about predictions that Canada will need more skilled tradespeople. It was lost on gov't, though. Gov'ts seem to recognize problems in their later stages and then sit on them for years, then ponder them for years, before finally doing something about them.

Should have been done a decade or so ago.Agree , but decades ago we had a government without any substance .
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

Should have been done a decade or so ago.
Agree , but decades ago we had a government without any substance .

Few gov'ts have substance. Past gov'ts have been complacent and happy just tending to the status quo. One thing I like about Harpy's gov't is that it actually seems interested in going past keeping things at status quo.
 
china
Conservative
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Few gov'ts have substance. Past gov'ts have been complacent and happy just tending to the status quo. One thing I like about Harpy's gov't is that it actually seems interested in going past keeping things at status quo.

Yeap ,Harper does what he promised he'll do !


Quote:

seems interested in going past keeping things at status quo.

Great , hope he'll dismental the private banks .
Last edited by china; Dec 19th, 2012 at 10:10 PM..
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
+4
#16
I am beginning to think there should be other restrictions as well for immigration to this
country. Immigrants must believe in the concept that peoples rights come before religion
and other people have rights too.
I am not in favour of allowing thousands of refugees into Canada either, the time has come
when we concentrate on the good of the nation and understand we can't solve all the world's
problems.
 
china
Conservative
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

[QUOTE

Immigration
Poland
Canada
Foreigners – so the bigoted adage goes – are "coming over here and stealing our jobs". Now it seems they are coming over here and stealing our immigrants. The Canadian government is courting Polish migrants living in Britain, in an attempt to persuade them to abandon our rainy shores in favour of a new life in Canada.

Canada is facing a shortage of labour, particularly in construction and transport, and hopes that Polish migrants from Britain will be easier to integrate than people coming directly from Poland because they already speak English. Canada's Immigration minister called a meeting with representatives of the Polish community at the Canadian High Commission in London last month, to discuss ways that Poles living in the UK could be poached. Canada plans to set up a trade show in Manchester next year, promoting the country's existing Polish community, and tempting the UK's Poles to move there.

On an official visit to England and Ireland, Jason Kenney boasted to Polish migrants: "Many of you would find a better job in Canada." He added that Canada also had a better economy, better social mobility and a lower cost of living than the UK.

In a speech to Polish expats in Ireland, Mr Kenney said: "The government of Canada is committed to building an immigration system that actively recruits talent rather than passively processing all applications that we receive. There are approximately 200,000 Poles living in Ireland, many with highly advanced skills in the trades needed in Canada's labour market."

There are already historical links between Poland and Canada, with around a million Canadians claiming Polish ancestry.

Włodek Mier-Jedrzejowicz, chairman of the UK Federation of Poles, said: "I got a call from someone in the Canadian ministry who said they were trying to make it easier for people to come and work in Canada, and arranged the meeting. He told me there is a large Polish community in Canada already and he's trying to make it easier for people to move. He's particularly keen on Polish people who have English skills.

"He said the Canadian economy was stronger than others since the banking sector did not invest in housing; and, because the economy is continuing to expand, they are looking for labour – for skilled workers for larger companies."

Bob Kozak, president of the Polish Society in Vancouver, said: "Canada is advertising an open door for Polish migrants and skilled workers. The Polish community here is huge, so it would be easy for people to settle in."

A spokesman for the Canadian government said: "Canada is building a fast and flexible economic immigration system whose primary focus is on meeting Canada's labour market needs. The government is exploring approaches to developing a pool of skilled workers who are ready to begin employment here."

Canada, he said, is facing shortages of workers in certain skilled trades. "Immigrants can help meet this need. There are over 200 trades, which generally fall under four main categories: construction, transportation, manufacturing and service. Forty to 50 per cent of skilled trade workers," he added, "are within the construction sector."

**************************************

Economic success makes Poland destination for immigrants
By Paul Henley
BBC News
Poland is Europe's least multicultural society, but could be on the cusp of becoming a destination for a new wave of migrants.

"When I first came here, I used to be scared to go out, always looking around in case the police caught me. I lived in constant fear."
Qui's story of being an illegal immigrant will be familiar to millions all over Europe. But he has come to a country that is hardly known as a magnet for migrants - Poland.

He is from Vietnam and part of one of Poland's biggest ethnic minorities. (The link began when both countries had communism in common.)

Our son has a Polish name because we live in Poland, we love Poland and we feel tied to it”

Qui and Thiem
Vietnamese immigrants
Qui works in the clothes trade in Warsaw. And these days, he has his own market stall, a family, an apartment in a concrete high-rise block on the outskirts of Warsaw… and peace of mind.
He is legal, having benefitted from an amnesty organised, earlier this year, by a government newly-aware that its economy needs people like him.

He says it feels like a huge weight has been lifted off his shoulders.

Qui and his wife Thiem met in Poland and they are proud of their new status and of their host country.
"Our son has a Polish name", they say, "because we live in Poland, we love Poland and we feel tied to it". They talk of his future university education there.

Changing capital
Venture a kilometre or two outside the historic centre of Warsaw and you do not have to look very hard to see how profoundly the capital is changing.

Paul Norris and his family emigrated from the UK
Bakalarska Market is a vast clothes, electrical and food retail centre run almost exclusively by non-Poles.

Music and voices from Vietnam, Bulgaria, Turkey, Nigeria, China, Ukraine and Belarus are proof of a nascent ethnic mix that would have been unimaginable until recently.

In the last two years, the number of applications for work permits in Poland has doubled.

Eurostat figures show only 0.1% of people in Poland were born abroad, the lowest figure in the European Union.

Before World War II, a quarter of Poland's population was Jewish, German or Ukrainian. But by 1947, virtually all those people had either been murdered or banished.

Stripped of their sovereignty as part of the Soviet bloc, Poles were left with their blood ties and their Catholicism to give them a sense of nationhood. And communism - as well as an entirely understandable persecution complex - helped keep the country in a kind of ethnic isolation.

But a long list of factors suggests the country's monoculture could soon be a thing of the past.

As most of Europe slows, economically, Poland picks up. It was the only EU member of 27 to avoid recession during the crisis of 2008-2009 and it continues to buck trends.


At the same time, it has labour shortages exacerbated by the emigration of millions of workers.

The man in charge of immigration policy, Rafal Rogala, seems well aware there are changes in store.

"I feel proud", says the Minister for Foreigners, "that Poland is a destination country for economic migrants. We understand them perfectly because, up until now, we have been the economic migrants.

"Buried deep within us is this gene of openness toward foreigners. We understand the need to improve your fate and build a life elsewhere. Now it is a question of education, of getting our people used to the idea that we are a destination country for lots of foreigners who will want to live and work here".

Economic circumstances
Mr Rogala admits that immigration might not be a matter of choice, given the economic circumstances.

He has reservations shared by western European politicians whose countries have already lived through an influx. And the British model is not one he is keen to copy.

In no way is he suggesting, he says, "that we want to become a multicultural society. Both Chancellor Merkel and President Sarkozy admitted that multi-culturalism had not passed the test".

The other end of Poland's new immigration spectrum is every bit as surprising as that represented by the family from Vietnam.

In Wroclaw, Poland's fourth city, 300km (200 miles) south-west of the capital, hundreds of expatriates from the world's richest nations came together for the Christmas party of the city's chamber of commerce.

American bankers networked with German PR officials and Danish software executives, all of whom have recently made Poland their home.
Vietnamese families make up one of Poland's biggest ethnic minorities
They compared large suburban homes, golf club membership, theatre visits and gourmet meals out.

Paul Norris arrived in Wroclaw from Surrey in England four months ago with his French wife, Catherine, and their two children. He is relishing his role as head of a fast-growing IT team at Credit Suisse's base there.

Emilie, 10, and Louis, 8, are enjoying Polish lessons at their international school.

Catherine might wrestle with the nuances of Polish life, but she, too, is glad they have made the move.
"I have met lots of really nice Polish people," she says.

"To start with, I thought they could be quite rude in shops, not particularly tolerant of foreigners. But I think they are quite private people and you have to understand them a little bit better.
"I have been reading about Polish history and they have been part of so many empires, people wanting bits of them. So it's no wonder the older people are as they are, a little defensive."

The family are discussing how long they will stay in Poland. They do not rule out the long-term.

Professor Krystyna Iglicka is an economist at the Lazarski School of Commerce and Law in Warsaw and advisor to the government on immigration.

"We need hard-working immigrants", she says, "eager to contribute to this nation. Ironically, we need exactly the same people you [the UK] got from us in the year 2004."

Just as western Europe got the ubiquitous "Polish plumber", she says, Poland got the Ukrainian nanny and the Belarusian builder.

And she hopes they are the front-runners of many more.

Thanks to its economic success, the face of Poland might never be the same again.

Hear the full report on BBC Radio 4's Crossing Continents. You can listen via the Radio 4 website or via the Crossing Continents podcast.

__________________________________________________ _____________________________

The Poles are leaving Poland the foreigners are moving into Poland surely POLAND won't be the same .
Last edited by china; Dec 20th, 2012 at 07:28 PM..
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

That reads strangely to me. Very few (none that I'm aware of) Journeymen acheive
that status in a minimum of two years.

I think it means they must have journeyman status for two years.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

Yeap ,Harper does what he promised he'll do !

Not everything. I doubt any politician does.




Quote:

Great , hope he'll dismental the private banks .

Why? It's because of the big 5 that Canada didn't end up in as bad a shape as most between 2007 and now.

Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

Economic success makes Poland destination for immigrants
By Paul Henley
BBC News
Poland is Europe's least multicultural society, but could be on the cusp of becoming a destination for a new wave of migrants.

Thanks to its economic success, the face of Poland might never be the same again.

Hear the full report on BBC Radio 4's Crossing Continents. You can listen via the Radio 4 website or via the Crossing Continents podcast.

__________________________________________________ _____________________________

The Poles are leaving Poland the foreigners are moving into Poland surely POLAND won't be the same .

Fascinating, but what's that have to do with Canadian immigration reform?
 
china
Conservative
#20
China
Quote:





The Poles are leaving Poland the foreigners are moving into Poland surely
POLAND won't be the same .

L Gilbert
Fascinating, but what's that have to do with Canadian immigration reform

Read below or above :

In a speech to Polish expats in Ireland, Mr Kenney said: "The government of Canada is committed to building an immigration system that actively recruits talent rather than passively processing all applications that we receive. There are approximately 200,000 Poles living in Ireland, many with highly advanced skills in the trades needed in Canada's labour market."

...........chairman of the UK Federation of Poles, said: "I got a call from someone in the Canadian ministry who said they were trying to make it easier for people to come and work in Canada, and arranged the meeting. He told me there is a large Polish community in Canada already and he's trying to make it easier for people to move. He's particularly keen on Polish people who have English skills
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

China

L Gilbert
Fascinating, but what's that have to do with Canadian immigration reform

Read below or above :

In a speech to Polish expats in Ireland, Mr Kenney said: "The government of Canada is committed to building an immigration system that actively recruits talent rather than passively processing all applications that we receive. There are approximately 200,000 Poles living in Ireland, many with highly advanced skills in the trades needed in Canada's labour market."

...........chairman of the UK Federation of Poles, said: "I got a call from someone in the Canadian ministry who said they were trying to make it easier for people to come and work in Canada, and arranged the meeting. He told me there is a large Polish community in Canada already and he's trying to make it easier for people to move. He's particularly keen on Polish people who have English skills

So? Again, what does that have to do with CIC reform?
 
china
Conservative
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

So? Again, what does that have to do with CIC reform?

Read it again .....maybe it will click....maybe.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#23
I asked you.
Apparently you seem to think CIC reform is about getting Poles to come to Canada.
 
china
Conservative
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

I asked you.
Apparently you seem to think CIC reform is about getting Poles to come to Canada.

Not really ,the workers happen to be Polish , they could be French or whatever , and that's ok with me .
The point is that no matter where they're from , they have advanced skills in their profession , and they
speak English .According to Government that's what Canada needs .
Merry Christmas .
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by chinaView Post

Not really ,the workers happen to be Polish , they could be French or whatever , and that's ok with me .
The point is that no matter where they're from , they have advanced skills in their profession , and they
speak English .According to Government that's what Canada needs.

Ahhhh. Thank you.
Quote:

Merry Christmas

Thanks, again. Nollaig Shona Dhuit! Slainte agus Sonas!
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

I am beginning to think there should be other restrictions as well for immigration to this
country. Immigrants must believe in the concept that peoples rights come before religion
and other people have rights too.
I am not in favour of allowing thousands of refugees into Canada either, the time has come
when we concentrate on the good of the nation and understand we can't solve all the world's
problems.

How right wing of you. LOL
 
china
Conservative
#27
China
Quote:
Quote:

Great , hope he'll dismental the private banks .

L Gilbert
Quote:

Why? It's because of the big 5 that Canada didn't end up in as bad a shape as most between 2007 and now.


I hope that this will explain something regarding the Canadian banks , Merry Christmas again LG.

Question: You say that the Government should create the money. Does it not already do it, with the Bank of Canada notes?
Answer: If the Federal Government does create its own money, why is it over $500 billion in debt? The truth is that bank notes and coins come into circulation only when they are lent by private banks, at interest. Moreover, this kind of money (cash) represents less than 10 per cent of the money supply in our country. The other kind of money, which represents over 90 per cent of the money supply, is bookkeeping or checkbook money, that is to say, figures written on checks or bank accounts.
Question: Why do you want the Government to create the money? Is not the present bank money good?
Answer: Chartered banks lend out money and put it into circulation at interest, in the form of a debt, which creates unpayable debts. For example, let us suppose that the bank lends you $100, at 6 per cent interest. The bank creates $100, but wants you to pay back $106. You can pay back $100, but not $106; the $6 for the interest does not exist, since only the bank has the right to create money, and it created $100, not $106.
In other words, when a chartered bank lends you money, it actually demands you to pay back money that does not exist. The only way to pay back $106 when there is only $100 in existence is to also borrow this $6 from the bank. Your problem is not solved yet; it has only gotten worse: you now owe the bank $106, plus an interest payment of 6 per cent, which makes a total of $112.36. As years pass, your debt gets bigger; there is no way to get out of it.
Some borrowers, taken individually, can manage to pay back their loans in full — the principal plus the interest —, but all the borrowers as a whole cannot. If some borrowers manage to pay back $106 when they received only $100, it is because they take the missing $6 in the money put into circulation through the money loaned to other borrowers. For some borrowers to be able to pay back their loans, others must go bankrupt. And it is only a matter of time until all the borrowers, without exception, find it impossible to pay the bankers back, whatever the rate of interest on their loans.
Some may say that if one does not want to get into debt, one has only not to borrow. Well, if no one borrowed money from the banks, there would simply be not a penny at all in circulation. And this money borrowed from the bank cannot remain in circulation indefinitely: it must be returned to the bank when the loan is due... and returned with interest, of course.

Unpayable debts
This means that just to maintain the same amount of money in circulation in our country, year after year, unpayable debts must pile up. For example, if one wants to maintain only $100 in circulation, year after year, by borrowing at 6% interest, the debt will be $106 after one year, then $112.36 after two years ($106 plus the 6% interest), and so on. After 70 years, the debt will have reached the sum of $5,907.59, and there will still be only $100 in circulation.
In the case of public debts, the bankers are satisfied as long as the interest on the debt is paid. Is it a favour they do to us? No, it only delays the financial impasse for a few years since, after a while, even the interest on the debt becomes unpayable. Thus, in the example of the $100 borrowed at 6%, the interest due on the debt will have reached $104.26 after 50 years, which is more than all the money in circulation. (See Chapter 34.)
No wonder then that the national debts of all the civilized countries in the world are reaching astronomical proportions. For example, Canada's national debt, which was $24 billion in 1975, is now over $500 billion, and the interest on this debt costs over $49 billion per year, or about one-third of all the taxes collected by the Federal Government; this percentage keeps increasing year after year. So, to satisfy the bankers, the Government must slash all its other expenditures. Will the Government wait until servicing the debt takes 100% of the taxes, to change the system, or will it prefer to let people starve? Moreover, the national debt is only the peak of the iceberg: there are also the debts of the provinces, the municipalities, the corporations, and the individuals!
Question: Does the Government have the power to create money? Would this money be as good as that of the banks?
Answer: The Government has indeed the power to create, issue the money of our country, since it is itself, the Federal Government, that has given this power to the chartered banks. For the Government to refuse to itself a privilege it has granted to the banks, is the height of imbecility! Moreover, it is actually the first duty of any sovereign government to issue its own currency, but all the countries today have unjustly given up this power to private corporations, the chartered banks. The first nation that thus surrendered to private corporations its power to create money was Great Britain, back in 1694. In both Canada and the U.S.A., this right was surrendered in 1913.
It is not the bankers who give money its value; it is the production of the country.
Bankers produce absolutely nothing; they only create the figures that allow the nation to make use of its own producing capacity, its own wealth.
Without the production of all the citizens in the country, the figures of the bankers are worthless. So, the Government can just as well create these figures itself, without going through the banks, and without getting into debt. Then why should the Government pay interest to a private banking system for the use of its money, when it could issue it itself, without going through the banks, without interest nor debt?
This very question was actually asked to Graham Towers, Governor of the Bank of Canada from 1935 to 1954, before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Banking and Commerce, in the spring of 1939 (page 394 of the Minutes of Proceedings and Evidence Respecting the Bank of Canada, Committee on Banking and Commerce, 1939):
“Will you tell me why a government with power to create money should give that power away to a private monopoly and then borrow that which parliament can create itself back at interest to the point of national bankruptcy?”
Answer of Towers:
“Now, if parliament wants to change the form of operating the banking system, then certainly that is within the power of parliament.”
As a matter of fact, the power of the Federal Government to create the money of our country is clearly stated in the Constitution (Section 91 of the British North America Act, paragraphs 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, and 20).

No danger of inflation
Question: Is there not any danger that the Government might misuse this power and issue too much money, which would result in runaway inflation? Is it not preferable for the Government to leave this power to the bankers, in order to keep it away from the whims of the politicians?
Answer: The money issued by the Government would be no more inflationary than the money created by the banks: it would be the same figures, based on the same production of the country. The only difference is that the Government would not have to get into debt, or to pay interest, in order to obtain these figures.
On the contrary, the first cause of inflation is precisely the money created as a debt by the banks: inflation means increasing prices. The obligation for the corporations and governments that are borrowing to bring back to the banks more money than the banks created, forces the corporations to increase the prices of their products, and the governments to increase their taxes.
What is the means used by the present Governor of the Bank of Canada to fight inflation? Precisely what actually increases it, that is to say, to increase the interest rates! As many Premiers put it, “It is like trying to extinguish a fire by pouring gasoline over it.”
It is obvious that if the Canadian Government decided to create or print money anyhow, without any limits, according to the whims of the men in office, without any relation with the existing production, there would definitely be runaway inflation. This is not at all what is proposed here by the Social Crediters.

Accurate bookkeeping
What the Social Crediters advocate, when they speak of money created by the Government, is that money must be brought back to its proper function, which is to be a figure, a ticket, that represents products, which in fact is nothing but simple bookkeeping. And since money is nothing but a bookkeeping system, the only necessary thing to do would be to establish accurate bookkeeping:
The Government would appoint a commission of accountants, an independent organism called the “National Credit Office” (in Canada, the Bank of Canada could well carry out this job if ordered to do so by the Government). This National Credit Office would be charged with setting up accurate accounting, where money would be nothing but the reflection, the exact financial expression, of economic realities: production would be expressed in assets, and consumption in liabilities. Since one cannot consume more than what has been produced, the liabilities could never exceed the assets, and deficits and debts would be impossible.
In practice, here is how it would work: the new money would be issued by the National Credit Office as new products are made, and would be withdrawn from circulation as these products are consumed (purchased). (Louis Even's booklet, A Sound and Effective Financial System, explains this mechanism in detail.) Thus there would be no danger of having more money than products: there would be a constant balance between money and products, money would always keep the same value, and any inflation would be impossible. Money would not be issued according to the whims of the Government nor of the accountants, since the commission of accountants, appointed by the Government, would act only according to the facts, according to what the Canadians produce and consume.
The best way to prevent any price increase is to lower prices. And Social Credit does also propose a mechanism to lower retail prices, called the “compensated discount”, which would allow the consumers to purchase all of the available production for sale with the purchasing power they have at their disposal, by lowering retail prices (a discount) by a certain percentage, so that the total retail prices of all the goods for sale would equal the available total purchasing power of the consumer. This discount would then be refunded to the retailers by the National Credit Office.
No more financial problems
If the Government issued its own money for the needs of society, it would be automatically able to pay for all that can be produced in the country, and would no longer be obliged to borrow from foreign or domestic financial institutions. The only taxes people would pay would be for the services they consume. One would no longer have to pay three or four times the actual price of public developments because of the interest charges.
So, when the Government would discuss a new project, it would not ask: “Do we have the money?”, but: “Do we have the materials and the workers to realize it?”. If it is so, new money would be automatically issued to finance this new production. Then the Canadians could really live in accordance with their real means, the physical means, the possibilities of production. In other words, all that is physically possible would be made financially possible. There would be no more financial problems. The only limit would be that of the producing capacity of the nation. The Government would be able to finance all the developments and social programs demanded by the population that are physically feasible.

No nationalization
Question: Does what you advocate require nationalizing private banks?
Answer: Not at all. The private banks could freely continue to exercise the functions that are rightfully theirs: receiving deposits and investing them. They could continue to loan money, but the creation of new money would be the sole prerogative of the sovereign government of the nation.

The education of the people by the “Michael” Journal
Question: If all that you have said above is true, and that a social money system, money created by a public organism on behalf of society, is so beneficial, why is it that the Government does not implement it right away?
Answer: Constitutionally speaking, there is nothing that prevents the Government from doing it immediately, since it has already the right to issue its own currency. It is the sovereign government of the nation that must be responsible for the monetary policy of our country, and not private corporations, for whom the objective is not at all the common good, but their own profit. On July 21, 1961, Louis Rasminski, who was Governor of the Bank of Canada from 1961 to 1973, sent the Government the following letter:
“If the Government disapproves of the monetary policy being carried out by the Bank (of Canada), it has the right and the responsibility to direct the Bank as to the policy which the Bank is to carry out... and the Bank should have the duty to comply with these instructions.”
The governments, despite statements that are often stupid, are perfectly aware of the iniquity of the creation of money by private companies, but they dare not to challenge the money power, for want of support among the population. (See Chapter 24, on Mackenzie King's statements in 1935.)
The only thing that is lacking is the education of the people, to show the falseness, the absurdity, and the injustice of the present financial system, and the existence of a corrective system like Social Credit. Only the “Michael” Journal denounces the present system and brings the Social Credit solution. The population must therefore study the “Michael” Journal. To that end, everyone must be subscribed to the “Michael” Journal.
Last edited by china; Dec 21st, 2012 at 07:12 PM..
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#28
lol I doubt the gov't and its bank by itself could have kept Canada secure. Minting money to combat unemployment and other ills generates other problems.
 
china
Conservative
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

lol I doubt the gov't and its bank by itself could have kept Canada secure. Minting money to combat unemployment and other ills generates other problems.

Obviously you have not read the full artical as it explains in details the role of the government and the control/production of the money .I will not explain to you ,it is explained above .
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#30
The gov't's obviously so efficient and careful with our money, yeah.
But this is about Canadian immigration reform. Your post #17 was about Poland.
 

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