Latest poll on Capital punishment


JLM
#1
This is just a poll and that is all it is, but according to CBC 62% of all Canadians want the death penalty reinstated. (I wonder if Olson's monthly stipend had anything to do with it................)
 
Colpy
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

This is just a poll and that is all it is, but according to CBC 62% of all Canadians want the death penalty reinstated. (I wonder if Olson's monthly stipend had anything to do with it................)

I have to say I'm surprized.....Canada is getting older and more conservative......as well, immigrants are often from conservative cultures.....

That is NOT to say I like this trend. I would never vote for a return to the old laws on Capital Punishment.

I might vote for a return if the penalty were reserved for mass killers.......on multiple convictions and DNA evidence.
 
YukonJack
#3
This may come as a surprise to many posters here, but I oppose death penalty. I do not write off anyone because there is always a slight, dim hope of redemption.

However, I do favour making the lives of people like Olsen as unpleasant as legally possible.
 
L Gilbert
#4
CBC seems to be confused, because the poll I found says more than 40% are opposed to the reinstatement of the DP.
Quote:

Forty-six per cent do not support the reintroduction of capital punishment while 40 per cent do. Another 14 per cent said they had no opinion.

CBC News - Canada - Canadians split on pot, death penalty: poll
 
JLM
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

I have to say I'm surprized.....Canada is getting older and more conservative......as well, immigrants are often from conservative cultures.....

That is NOT to say I like this trend. I would never vote for a return to the old laws on Capital Punishment.

I might vote for a return if the penalty were reserved for mass killers.......on multiple convictions and DNA evidence.

Well Colpy, we've been told time and time again by the forum authority on everything that Conservatives like capital punishment, so if their numbers are increasing, I'm surprised that would surprise you. (Or are you questioning the resident authority?)
THAT would be tantamount to blasphemy.
 
JLM
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by YukonJackView Post

This may come as a surprise to many posters here, but I oppose death penalty. I do not write off anyone because there is always a slight, dim hope of redemption.

However, I do favour making the lives of people like Olsen as unpleasant as legally possible.

Yep, I've often thought being deposited naked in a concrete bunker with no furniture, books or anything, just a bare cell heated to 58 F and daily fare consisting of maccaroni and water only would be as bad as the death penalty.
 
JLM
#7
Oh yeah, one other thing Y.J. you can only redeem criminals where it is possible for them to right the wrong, it's impossible to right the wrong of the vicious rape and murder of a 9 year old girl.
 
#juan
#8
We haven't yet passed a bill allowing capital punishment yet but I see no reason not to test the equipment to make sure it all still works. Thank goodness we have the likes of Olson and Bernardo and others just standing around when they could be doing us a great service by volunteering to test old Sparky and the gallows. This equipment needn't be tested more than once a week or so but I understand we have over twenty other institutional guests who have been found guilty of very similar offenses who we could have volunteer as well..
 
Socrates the Greek
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by YukonJackView Post

This may come as a surprise to many posters here, but I oppose death penalty. I do not write off anyone because there is always a slight, dim hope of redemption.

However, I do favour making the lives of people like Olsen as unpleasant as legally possible.

 
Machjo
#10
I could see three options for murder: the two most common being the death penalty and life imprisonment.

If we go with the second option, I'd still say get all we can out of him work-wise. Make him contribute to the economy.

The third option I could see if and only if there is evidence that the person who committed the murder had done so under rarely occurring special circumstances without which he'd likely never have committed the murder, would be a lifetime of exile from the city in which he'd committed the murder, mainly to not provoke emotions among the family and friends of the victim. Though I could see him get sued too for emotional damages, thus making a financial contribution to the family of the victim. I think we need to find ways to discourage crime but in ways that do not necessarily burden us economically as much as possible.
 
gerryh
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Oh yeah, one other thing Y.J. you can only redeem criminals where it is possible for them to right the wrong, it's impossible to right the wrong of the vicious rape and murder of a 9 year old girl.

you mean like this guy?

Guy Paul Morin

Christine Jessop, a nine-year-old girl, disappeared from her Queensville, Ont., home in October 1984. Her body was found in a farmer's field two months later. Guy Paul Morin, the Jessops' next-door neighbour in the community about 60 km north of Toronto, was later charged with her murder.
Morin was acquitted in 1986, but a new trial was ordered by the Ontario Court of Appeal. At this second trial, Morin was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.
He appealed and in 1995 was exonerated by DNA testing.
A public inquiry into the case was called, and its report was tabled in 1998. It concluded that mistakes by the police, prosecutors and forensic scientists combined to send an innocent man to jail.
 
Liberalman
#12
have a lottery on who will pull the switch
Put it on pay per view and give the money to the victims family
 
dreamwatcher
#13
Opposed to the death penalty. But LIFE IN PRISON, must mean Life in Prison. With DNA this may help.
 
JLM
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

you mean like this guy?

Guy Paul Morin

Christine Jessop, a nine-year-old girl, disappeared from her Queensville, Ont., home in October 1984. Her body was found in a farmer's field two months later. Guy Paul Morin, the Jessops' next-door neighbour in the community about 60 km north of Toronto, was later charged with her murder.
Morin was acquitted in 1986, but a new trial was ordered by the Ontario Court of Appeal. At this second trial, Morin was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.
He appealed and in 1995 was exonerated by DNA testing.
A public inquiry into the case was called, and its report was tabled in 1998. It concluded that mistakes by the police, prosecutors and forensic scientists combined to send an innocent man to jail.

No not like that guy, just the guilty ones. Olson led the cops to where he buried bodies.
 
gerryh
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

No not like that guy, just the guilty ones. Olson led the cops to where he buried bodies.

 
JLM
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

We haven't yet passed a bill allowing capital punishment yet but I see no reason not to test the equipment to make sure it all still works. Thank goodness we have the likes of Olson and Bernardo and others just standing around when they could be doing us a great service by volunteering to test old Sparky and the gallows. This equipment needn't be tested more than once a week or so but I understand we have over twenty other institutional guests who have been found guilty of very similar offenses who we could have volunteer as well..

Yeah, there's a bit of a back log alright. Darren Huineman is another (little bastard has his own mother and grandmother murdered out of greed), then there's Pickton and as far as I'm concerned Colin Thatcher was another guy who should have been deep sixed.........that was a particularly cruel murder. I just can't see these bastards serving any useful purpose for hanging around. Have said the above I'm basically against the death penalty - should just be reserved for the worst cases where there is undisputable proof and generally speaking guilty of more than one murder.
 
gerryh
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

No not like that guy, just the guilty ones. Olson led the cops to where he buried bodies.

Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post


Oh......you mean like this guy.

Simon Marshall

Simon Marshall was imprisoned from 1997 to 2003 after he wrongly confessed to a string of sexual assaults in Ste-Foy, a Quebec City suburb. A DNA test later cleared Marshall, a mentally handicapped man. The Quebec Court of Appeal ruled he was a victim of miscarried justice and ordered his criminal record expunged.
It was later found that DNA evidence first collected in the investigation that led to Marshall's conviction was never tested. An inquiry also revealed multiple breaches in police conduct during the investigation.
In December 2006, the Quebec government awarded the 24-year-old $2.3 million, the highest wrongful conviction compensation to date in the province. The money went to Marshall's parents, who are in charge of his care.
 
Machjo
#18
Hey, efficiency I say. Make sure nothing goes to waste. If we have to put a murderer to death, then why not put him to good use at the same time. The military needs target practice now and then anyway, no? It could save on paper targets, which aren't free by the way.
 
Machjo
#19
But if he stays alive an stays in prison, then put him to work.
 
Machjo
#20
Actually, what about resource exploitation in remote areas? It's far from society so running away could prove to be tricky unless he can survive on grass and pine needles for a while on his treck on foot to civilization.

Since in prison they have no family to take care of, they're mobile. And having them work in the mines would keep them busy so as to make time fly by faster. We'd be doing them a favour.
 
VanIsle
#21
I believe in full life imprisonment for murder. I also believe that when you go to prison, murder or other wise, you should lose your "rights". No voting. No OAS pay. No - Do you want to work today? Just tell them what their job is for the day and make it hard. This slacking off with a bed and 3 meals a day for nothing in return is wrong. It should be work work work. I sincerely doubt that most murderers care much if they receive the death penalty. They know they are just going to sit around in some prison almost forever anyway. For many of them, the lack of desire for hard work was what got them inside in the first place. Give them hard work. Everybody works and anyone who earns their way out (those without life terms) should be given a lump sum depending on "years of service". (less expenses for items like cigarettes.)
 
JLM
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

Oh......you mean like this guy.

Simon Marshall

Simon Marshall was imprisoned from 1997 to 2003 after he wrongly confessed to a string of sexual assaults in Ste-Foy, a Quebec City suburb. A DNA test later cleared Marshall, a mentally handicapped man. The Quebec Court of Appeal ruled he was a victim of miscarried justice and ordered his criminal record expunged.
It was later found that DNA evidence first collected in the investigation that led to Marshall's conviction was never tested. An inquiry also revealed multiple breaches in police conduct during the investigation.
In December 2006, the Quebec government awarded the 24-year-old $2.3 million, the highest wrongful conviction compensation to date in the province. The money went to Marshall's parents, who are in charge of his care.

You're getting warmer but you are not there yet. If a sane person confessed then there's not much you can do about that except to check him out for knowledge that only the guilty suspect would have. LIke Olson, pointed out the grave.
 
JLM
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by MachjoView Post

Hey, efficiency I say. Make sure nothing goes to waste. If we have to put a murderer to death, then why not put him to good use at the same time. The military needs target practice now and then anyway, no? It could save on paper targets, which aren't free by the way.

Excellent point- Or next time they send a space shuttle out, see how long he can survive strapped to the outside of it. If he makes it back alive parole him.
 
Machjo
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Excellent point- Or next time they send a space shuttle out, see how long he can survive strapped to the outside of it. If he makes it back alive parole him.

Hmmm... I don't quite see how we'd benefit from that. It would be expensive and we know he wouldn't survive already.

I'd say hard labour is probably the way to go if it's life in prison, and if it's death, then firing squad for target practice.
 
shadowshiv
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post


I might vote for a return if the penalty were reserved for mass killers.......on multiple convictions and DNA evidence.

I would vote for Capital Punishment to return, but only in cases where there is no doubt to the crime. By this I mean someone leading authorities to a body(or bodies) that no one BUT the killer would know were there, or if there was videotaped evidence(such as the Bernardo ones). Testimony can be flawed, and sometimes so can DNA(witch hunts, misplaced samples, etc.). There has to be NO doubt at all for this to be a viable option.

In all other cases, it should be life in prison with NO possibility of parole. At least then, if evidence ever comes across that the person was not guilty then they are at least alive(and will likely get a huge settlement).

I also think that their rights should cease once they are imprisoned. By this, I mean they should not get to vote, they should not get pensions, etc. Prison is supposed to be a punishment, after all.
 
Machjo
#26
And again, if evidence suggests he'd likely not commit another murder, then life of exile from the city where the crime occurred, along with a possible civil lawsuit, ought to suffice. Prison is expensive after all, so if he's not deemd a threat, let him work, pay taxes, and pay retribution, in those cases where the circumstances surrounding the murder were special and unlikely to occur again.
 
shadowshiv
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsleView Post

I believe in full life imprisonment for murder. I also believe that when you go to prison, murder or other wise, you should lose your "rights". No voting. No OAS pay. No - Do you want to work today? Just tell them what their job is for the day and make it hard. This slacking off with a bed and 3 meals a day for nothing in return is wrong. It should be work work work. I sincerely doubt that most murderers care much if they receive the death penalty. They know they are just going to sit around in some prison almost forever anyway. For many of them, the lack of desire for hard work was what got them inside in the first place. Give them hard work. Everybody works and anyone who earns their way out (those without life terms) should be given a lump sum depending on "years of service". (less expenses for items like cigarettes.)

I could be mistaken, but isn't it illegal for prisoners to smoke in prisons now(and that includes the yard)? I realize that they would still get contraband smokes, but the majority of them would be taken away.
 
Machjo
#28
Of course smoking ought to be prohibited. They'd need healthy lungs to work more efficiently and to keep medical costs down.
 
Machjo
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by YukonJackView Post

However, I do favour making the lives of people like Olsen as unpleasant as legally possible.

I don't agree with this. It's not conducive to productive efficiency.
 
Ron in Regina
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

I could be mistaken, but isn't it illegal for prisoners to smoke in prisons now(and that includes the yard)? I realize that they would still get contraband smokes, but the majority of them would be taken away.


Shadowshiv, I think you're correct unless the situation arises that Tobacco use
is justified via culture or religion (Natives, etc...).

You post above brings "David Milgaard" to mind...& it took (I think) 36yrs to
straighten that one out....

David Milgaard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (external - login to view)
 

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