Who's the worst Canadian?


karrie
#1
Thought this link might spark some chat. Who would you pick as the worst Canadian? And why?

www.historysociety.ca/bea.asp...on=ext&page=WC (external - login to view)
 
jwv
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Thought this link might spark some chat. Who would you pick as the worst Canadian? And why?

www.historysociety.ca/bea.asp...on=ext&page=WC (external - login to view)

This is easy.. Mulroney for his pro-American policies and attempts to dismantle our country by bringing us into even more of a servitude position with the yankees.
 
El Barto
#3
OH wow Beaver has his own magazine?
Last edited by El Barto; May 4th, 2007 at 05:53 AM..
 
#juan
#4
Worst Canadian?

Well, Pickton the pig farmer would be on my list, and so would Clifford Olsen. The former preyed on women, and the latter preyed on children.
 
darkbeaver
#5
Thomas D'quino, Preston Manning, Sleezen Harpercon, Brian Mulrooney. Take your pick.
 
temperance
#6
They have'nt been born yet, I Imagine
 
temperance
#7
"Sleezen Harpercon"

lollol
 
Colpy
#8
After the fall of Hong Kong and the capture of 2500 Canadians, many of the prisoners were shipped to a camp in Japan. One of the Japanese Sergeants had been brought up in BC, and had returned to Japan just before the war. He tortured, murdered, and made the lives of the Canadians miserable.......no doubt in revenge for the racism he had suffered.....but WHO CARES?

The story has an appropriate ending. This guy was so bad that after the war he was tried for war crimes. As a non-commissioned officer, the maximum sentence would have been 10 years. His defense? (with consultation with his lawyer) As a Canadian citizen, he could not be tried for Japanese war crimes. The tribunal agreed........and shipped him straight to Canada, where he was tried for treason, convicted, and hanged.

Justice done.

Talk about reason to fire your lawyer!

Now, where are those Khadrs?
Last edited by Colpy; May 4th, 2007 at 09:51 AM..
 
dirtylinder
#9
Why they named a town in Canada after him, I'll never know! But, without him, would we still have a town called Moosejaw?
 
Curiosity
#10
Colpy / Dirtylinder - do you have his name?

Is there anything I can read about this guy? I've never heard the story before.
 
Walter
#11
Most peolple mention politicians in this kind of a poll.
My top 2 for worst Canadians are: 1) Mike Pearson
2) Turdoh
 
#juan
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

After the fall of Hong Kong and the capture of 2500 Canadians, many of the prisoners were shipped to a camp in Japan. One of the Japanese Sergeants had been brought up in BC, and had returned to Japan just before the war. He tortured, murdered, and made the lives of the Canadians miserable.......no doubt in revenge for the racism he had suffered.....but WHO CARES?

The story has an appropriate ending. This guy was so bad that after the war he was tried for war crimes. As a non-commissioned officer, the maximum sentence would have been 10 years. His defense? (with consultation with his lawyer) As a Canadian citizen, he could not be tried for Japanese war crimes. The tribunal agreed........and shipped him straight to Canada, where he was tried for treason, convicted, and hanged.



Justice done.

Talk about reason to fire your lawyer!

Now, where are those Khadrs?

Kamloops or Kamloops Kid, was Kanao Inouye, he was personally responsible for the deaths of eight Canadian soldiers held as prisoners. At the end of the war he was imprisoned for war crimes and this created quite a problem for the Canadian Government. Kanao Inouye was a Canadian citizen and there is no provision in the Canadian government to execute one of its own citizens for war crimes. However, Kanao Inouye was tried for treason and executed.
 
able
#13
Colpy: I remember the story about that guy, but can't remember his name. Wish you hadn't mentioned it, because now I'm getting the urge to look back into the histories of the Winnipeg Grenadiers, and Royal Rifles of Canada. If my memory serves me right, they used to derisively call him the "Canadian kid". I do know for certain, he wasn't named Moosejaw, sorry Curiosity, you got fished.
 
Colpy
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Kamloops or Kamloops Kid, was Kanao Inouye, he was personally responsible for the deaths of eight Canadian soldiers held as prisoners. At the end of the war he was imprisoned for war crimes and this created quite a problem for the Canadian Government. Kanao Inouye was a Canadian citizen and there is no provision in the Canadian government to execute one of its own citizens for war crimes. However, Kanao Inouye was tried for treason and executed.

Thanks for the details, Juan.
 
able
#15
One finger typing? Thanks Juan, I remembered it as Canadian kid, but as soon as I saw your post, I knew you were right. Now I don't have to go looking, thanks again.
 
eh1eh
#16
Harold Ballard was pretty bad. What about Nickleback, the whole band but mainly the lead singer. Hideous.
 
#juan
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Thanks for the details, Juan.

Colpy

I had just read about this character. Before the reading, I only had a vague recollection of these events.

Able

I am an expert one-finger typist. Sometimes, by the time I finish my reply, I can't find the topic...
 
El Barto
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Colpy

I had just read about this character. Before the reading, I only had a vague recollection of these events.

Able

I am an expert one-finger typist. Sometimes, by the time I finish my reply, I can't find the topic...

lol I know what you mean.............................................. ....why was I laughing?
 
karrie
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Worst Canadian?

Well, Pickton the pig farmer would be on my list, and so would Clifford Olsen. The former preyed on women, and the latter preyed on children.

I considered Pickton too. Obviously, he's fresh in my mind (especially since we talked about him yesterday, AND he was mentioned on CSI last night). He stands out as a horrible human. But is he a bad Canadian? What constitutes being a bad Canadian? I felt perhaps the survey was looking for the person who's most damaged our image or culture. Pickton didn't really do that. But I'm at a loss for naming any one person.
 
#juan
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

I considered Pickton too. Obviously, he's fresh in my mind (especially since we talked about him yesterday, AND he was mentioned on CSI last night). He stands out as a horrible human. But is he a bad Canadian? What constitutes being a bad Canadian? I felt perhaps the survey was looking for the person who's most damaged our image or culture. Pickton didn't really do that. But I'm at a loss for naming any one person.

My third choice would have been Mulroney, who ran our debt up to half a trillion dollars. The approximately $35 billion in annual interest charges has handcuffed every Canadian government since.
 
Walter
#21
According to MPP Denis Coderre, Shane Doan is the worst Canadian.
 
El Barto
#22
I refuse to answer to to the fact i'd name too many politicians...all politicians....
And to my disatisfaction only name one........
 
Curiosity
#23
Thanks Juan for posting the name...

I found one item on Google...


http://www.thefighting44s.com/archives/2006/04/17/responsibility-slug/ (external - login to view)



| April 17, 2006

Responsibility

Last year marked the 60th Anniversary of the end of World War II. In journalism, it was a year filled with a great number of articles, all eloquently written and appropriately filled with reflection and sorrow. Many were based on stories from the survivors and veterans of The Last Great War, recounting the horror and tragedy of war; all had the implicit and important messages we all know, but seem never to learn. “Peace In Our Time.” “Lest We Forget.” “Never Again.”
I read a story in the Globe and Mail about a Canadian veteran who was captured when Hong Kong fell to the Japanese in 1942. He recalled one particularly brutal Japanese sergeant, Kanao Inouye, who was responsible for torturing and killing at least eight Canadian PoWs under his supervision. They nicknamed him “The Kamloops Kid” because he was born and raised in Kamloops, B.C.
By all accounts, the “Kid” was a vicious piece of work: sadistic, cruel, openly motivated to revenge against the white Canadian soldiers because of the racism he’d received growing up here. “When I was in Canada I took all kinds abuse,” Kanao purportedly said to the PoWs. “They called me a little yellow bastard. Now where is your so-called superiority, you dirty scum?” The Kid was eventually tried by the War Crimes Judiciary after the war, convicted of treason, and hanged in 1947.
In everything I’d read about the Kid, he was almost uniformly hated, castigated as a monster, a traitor, a failure of a man. But a strange thing happened to me when I was reading about him. I found myself grieving. Not only for the victims of his cruelty. But also for him.
I certainly don’t condone his crimes. But I did wonder: is it wrong to grieve for him? Is it wrong to grieve for any of humanity’s monsters, the evil and twisted creatures from our sordid past, who committed crimes above and beyond anything I or any other normal, warm-blooded human being could even imagine?
In grieving, I felt alone. Because no one else grieved for him. No one even seemed to remotely feel anything for him and if they did, it was hatred. Indeed, references to him were either dispassionately academic (a curious artifact of war) or to vilify or dismiss him (a Jap bastard) as something beneath us all.
I’ve never heard anyone ask a simple Why?
I know it’s a question that often goes unanswered in life; maybe because the answers are too complex, too revealing, too much to bear. But I don’t believe for a moment that there isn’t an answer. I do believe it’s our responsibility to ask ourselves all the tough questions in life. Especially Why.
Because by not asking, it makes it sound like this and all other crimes occurred in a vacuum. Nothing in this world occurs in a vacuum. Cause and effect is the inviolable rule in this life; there is always a chain of events upon a chain of events that is directly attributable to the act. The father beat the child, who then grew up a murderer. The jocks humiliated the geeks in the cafeteria, who then became killer gunmen. The mean white boys beat up the “little yellow bastard,” who then became The Kamloops Kid.
I know it’s not that simple. Complex organisms fed complex variables in complex environments defy simple statements of causality, and we’d be doing the victims of the Kid an injustice if we merely resolved that he was just a mistreated boy who couldn’t help but act out on his rage.
I won’t do that. But I will grieve for him. I take that as my responsibility.
I do it because of his untold stories of pain and suffering and abuse, physical and emotional. As much as he’s dismissed as an aberration of our species, his stories are there, remain there, the only difference being that he was one of the few insane enough to act on them, perverting his pain and taking it past the bounds of humanity, with tragic consequences.
I do it because I know that acts of sprained cruelty aren’t beyond any of us. Most of us under the bell curve, myself included, are merely lucky to have prevented the pain of our personal experiences from overwhelming our common sense as regular, decent human beings. We’re all at most six degrees away from committing a horrible atrocity, an unspeakable crime, something that would destroy others, and ourselves.
I wonder, if I were in the Kid’s situation, what would I have done? What choices would I have made? And then I realize I could never be in his situation, but I came pretty damn close. I think back to the muscled, leering white bullies of my youth, laughing at me, insulting me, making me kiss the pavement all too often back home in the small southern Ontario town where I grew up, just because of my skin color. I remember during one incident, I fought back. My parents had signed me up for judo lessons, and I ended up flipping one of my tormentors over in a smooth, practiced motion. Immediately, a boy named Craig picked me up by the lapels and cursed at me: “I’ll beat the **** out of you, you ****ing bag of rice.” A teacher broke it up.
I remember it all vividly, viscerally, the fear and the shame and the rage at being weak and scared and unable to defend myself. I shudder to think what kind of revenge or restitution I could have meted out. It saddens me that I have, in fact, thought of revenge at all. Back then. And right now.
And I am proud that I made the right choice. That, too, is my responsibility.
I guess that makes it sound paradoxical, doesn’t it? We’re loath to bear responsibility for creating the monsters in our midst, but they are there. And they are us. We’re obligated to break the chain of pain, to make sure the potential monster in all of us never comes to be, regardless of the suffering and abuse, physical and emotional, we’ve all been subjected to. It is, above all, the most basic responsibility each and every one of us has.
It may sound maudlin, but they say wisdom is the lesson learned not from making mistakes, but by avoiding them. I can use my pain for goodness instead of pettiness, to teach rather than inflict, to connect rather than sever. I can close my fist to strike. But I can also open my heart, and swallow the pain of others who display it in forms that are misinterpreted as rage and anger and cruelty. It makes me remember a corruption of the Prayer of St. Francis I heard while watching Band of Brothers, a miniseries about the American 101st Airborne in World War II:
To be understood is to understand all.
To be loved is to love, with all my heart.
With all my heart.
A closed fist. An open heart.
Share This (external - login to view)
 
TenPenny
#24
Me. Just me.
 
s243a
#25
All though Mulrony and Treudo probably deserve it I'm going to bot for David Suzuki. :P
 
DurkaDurka
#26
My votes are:

Jacque Parizeau
Lucien Bouchard
Trudeau lineage
Celine Dion
DarkBeaver
 
TenPenny
#27
I think we have to decide what the question means. Is it the worst person, who happens to be a Canadian, ala Pickton, etc, or is it the person who is the worst Canadian, as in a policitian or other person of influence who did the most damage to the country?

If the latter, I'll go with
Charles Lawrence, the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, who ordered the deportation of the Acadians.
 
RomSpaceKnight
#28
I'm going to have to go with the serial killers. Pickton, Olsen and of course Bernardo.
 
jwv
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by WalterView Post

Most peolple mention politicians in this kind of a poll.
My top 2 for worst Canadians are: 1) Mike Pearson
2) Turdoh

Turdoh?
 
Colpy
#30
I believe he is refering to one Right Honourable (now there's a laugh) Pierre Elliot Trudeau.
 

Similar Threads

152
Worst Canadian
by Walter | Nov 23rd, 2009
11
Better than worst?
by Kreskin | May 1st, 2007
3
no new posts