congratulatons to team canada hockey mens gold medal win


gopher
#91
"NHL hockey is a big money game these days."

Not necessarily in the States. Let me say again that a few years ago the NHL Stanley Cup championship game had a LOWER tv rating than did senior bowling:


"the {Fox} network had acquired an underperforming TV property that traditionally drew lower ratings than bowling."

Marketing Campaign Case Studies: NHL ON FOX CAMPAIGN (external - login to view)



In several cities attendance is very low and the teams are not making much money, especially in the south:

www.nytimes.com/2009/10/02/sp...ey/02hits.html (external - login to view)



Like it or not, the NHL is going to have to make changes if it wishes to gain popularity in the USA. My hope, as I stated on another thread, is that it will adopt Olympic rules.
 
petros
#92
Have the Leafs won yet?
 
talloola
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Have the Leafs won yet?

what year is it?
 
Kreskin
#94
Bettman does move according to the wishes of the owners. However, do the owners of Toronto and Ottawa want a lucrative team in Hamilton? Of course not. A Hamilton franchise would make as much money as a quarter of the US NHL franchises combined. But it might take a bit out of the other regional owners pockets, so it's not in the "NHL's" interests.

Those owners carry a lot of weight. They would much rather find a group to pay an exorbitant franchise fee then put them in the middle of nowhere, so they don't infringe on their party.
 
wulfie68
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by talloolaView Post

Well it's nice to finally hear someone put the blame where it belongs re: inflation of salaries, and not on the players, and yes I do remember when owners were fighting over certain players, and handed them huge salaries, just
to 'get' that player, I remember St. Louis being the first to do that, forget the player. No Salary cap then, and I agree with the salary cap, that was a good move for the
sake of balancing out the competative abilities of allteams.

Yeah it was Ron Caron when he was the GM in St Louis, he made an offer to Scott Stevens in about 1989 or so, paying him $4 million (if my memory is correct) a year to get him out of Washington, then he made an offer to a young restricted free agent named Brendan Shanahan in New Jersey. St Louis lost Stevens as compensation for Shanahan, so Caron then made a similar offer to Al McInnis in Calgary. Then the floodgates opened as the Rangers, Leafs, Flyers and a few others jumped on board.
 
talloola
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by wulfie68View Post

Yeah it was Ron Caron when he was the GM in St Louis, he made an offer to Scott Stevens in about 1989 or so, paying him $4 million (if my memory is correct) a year to get him out of Washington, then he made an offer to a young restricted free agent named Brendan Shanahan in New Jersey. St Louis lost Stevens as compensation for Shanahan, so Caron then made a similar offer to Al McInnis in Calgary. Then the floodgates opened as the Rangers, Leafs, Flyers and a few others jumped on board.

yeah, I remember, and of course it was stevens, and I also
remember the shanahan deal too, yes, that was the beginning
of it all.
 
Risus
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

Bettman does move according to the wishes of the owners. However, do the owners of Toronto and Ottawa want a lucrative team in Hamilton? Of course not. A Hamilton franchise would make as much money as a quarter of the US NHL franchises combined. But it might take a bit out of the other regional owners pockets, so it's not in the "NHL's" interests.

Those owners carry a lot of weight. They would much rather find a group to pay an exorbitant franchise fee then put them in the middle of nowhere, so they don't infringe on their party.

Actually having a good team in Hamilton would provide welcomed competition for both Toronto, Ottawa, as well a Buffalo and Detroit. A healthy competition is good.
 
talloola
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by RisusView Post

Actually having a good team in Hamilton would provide welcomed competition for both Toronto, Ottawa, as well a Buffalo and Detroit. A healthy competition is good.

for the toronto team and the buffalo team, a healthy group competing together isn't important, it is important for
them to have a bulging profit, with no interference from
other teams, it is only the fans and the players who
would like the healthy competition, but the NHL and the
owners don't give a 'hoot' about that.
 
TenPenny
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by RisusView Post

Actually having a good team in Hamilton would provide welcomed competition for both Toronto, Ottawa, as well a Buffalo and Detroit. A healthy competition is good.

Competition on the ice is there already, and is guaranteed no matter where the other teams are located.
Competition at the box office is not good, if your product is sub-standard, has been for 40 years, and only survives because you have a near-monopoly.
 
#juan
#100
What Sidney Crosby’s Olympic goal meant to Paul Henderson

Everything is right in the country again

by Paul Henderson on Monday, March 29, 2010 11:55am - 2 Comments (external - login to view)
I wasn’t watching the game when Sidney Crosby scored to win the gold medal for Canada. My wife and I speak at marriage conferences and we were doing one in Victoria, B.C., at the time. We had given a speech all through the first period, but had a break over lunch, so I watched the second and third periods, or what I thought was going to be the end of the game.
When the U.S. tied it up, I had 120 couples waiting for me to talk. I told them before we started that if anyone’s got a radio or an iPod, to not say a word if the U.S. scores. But if Canada scores, please yell it out.
About 15 minutes into the talk, a lady yelled out, “Crosby’s just scored for Canada!” We went nuts and cheered. It was the first time in my life I ever led a singalong when we spontaneously started singing ‘O Canada.’

There were several American couples there and they stood up with us. My wife was smart enough to thank them for standing up as we sang our national anthem, as difficult as that might have been. I’d forgotten about the Americans being there or I might have been a little more sensitive myself. I had obviously gotten caught up in the moment.
The truth is I had gotten caught up in the whole Olympics. I think most of Canada did. The hockey tournament seemed to carry a bit more importance, though. It seemed to be that if we could just win that, everything would be right in the country again.
I’m the eternal optimist, so I always thought Canada would win. And if I was going to pick somebody to score in the overtime period, Crosby seemed like a natural choice. You’re going to go with a goal scorer. In ’72, I probably would’ve picked Phil Esposito.
Immediately after the game, Crosby said he couldn’t remember how he’d scored his goal. I could play mine in slow motion. A guy had tripped me and I fell behind the net. Even falling, I remember thinking, ‘I’ve still got enough time to score a goal.’ Then I saw Esposito take a whack at it. Vladislav Tretiak should’ve just covered it—I should never have been able to get the rebound. It wasn’t a hard shot, but Esposito probably surprised him. The puck came right to me and, to be truthful, I really panicked and tried to fire it along the ice. Tretiak went down and he got it with his pad. But, thank goodness for me, it came back and I just fired it again. To see it go in was just incredible.
When that puck went over the line, my first thought was sort of melancholy—I thought of my dad. He had died in 1968 and I had not thought of him once during that whole season. But I remember saying out lout, ‘Oh, Dad would’ve loved this one.’ It was gone in a millisecond and I jumped into Cournoyer’s arms and we’ve been celebrating for 38 years.
There’s no question we’ll be celebrating Crosby’s goal in much the same way. Of course, some of the circumstances are different. For me, the goal changed expectations. I quit enjoying the game for a while because I started putting so much pressure on myself, trying to do things I could never do. But for Crosby, this doesn’t change his game at all. This is who he is and this is what he does, game in and game out. And in 1972, with communism, it was an ideological war as much as a hockey war. It’s tough to get really upset about the U.S.
Still, for Canadians that weren’t around 38 years ago, Crosby’s goal will be a defining mark. Canadians will remember where they were, what they were doing, how they celebrated, and Crosby will forever be known as the guy that scored The Goal, just like I am.
 
Libertarian
#101
Go Canada !!!!!!!!!
 
talloola
#102
what a great post, I would never have known. A special
moment at that meeting, and a special moment for henderson.

thanks.
 

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