Where's the Thread on "George Floyd" ????

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
20/20April 2021George Floyd: A Man, A Moment, America Changed
S43E23George Floyd: A Man, A Moment, America Changed
An intimate portrait of George Floyd’s life on the heels of Derek Chauvin’s murder conviction.
NR | 04.23.21 | 01:19:41 | CC
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,725
3,680
113
Twin Moose Creek
Have you been following all the incidents happening in George Floyd square? Cops won't enter it and anyone injured have to be moved out to get help, 2 died so far because of it.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin asks judge for new trial
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Brendan O'Brien
Publishing date:May 04, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is shown in this police booking photo after a jury found him guilty on all counts in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., Tuesday, April 20, 2021. Picture released on Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is shown in this police booking photo after a jury found him guilty on all counts in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., Tuesday, April 20, 2021. Picture released on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. PHOTO BY MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS /REUTERS
Article content
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin asked a Minneapolis judge on Tuesday for a new trial, court records showed, two weeks after he was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd.

In a series of motions filed to District Court Judge Peter Cahill, Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, said his client was deprived of a fair trial, adding there was prosecutorial and jury misconduct, errors of law at trial and that the verdict was contrary to law.


On April 20, a 12-member jury found Chauvin, 45, guilty on all three counts he faced after considering three weeks of testimony from 45 witnesses, including bystanders, police officials and medical experts.

The rare verdict against a police officer is considered a milestone in the fraught racial history of the United States and a rebuke of law enforcement’s treatment of Black Americans.

In a confrontation captured on video, Chauvin, a white veteran of the police force, pushed his knee into the neck of Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man in handcuffs, for more than 9 minutes on May 25, 2020. Chauvin and three fellow officers were attempting to arrest Floyd, accused of using a fake $20 bill to buy cigarettes at a grocery store.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
Four ex-cops face U.S. rights charges in George Floyd killing
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 07, 2021 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 21 Comments
In this March 10, 2021, a woman walks near the makeshift memorial of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn.
In this March 10, 2021, a woman walks near the makeshift memorial of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn. PHOTO BY CHANDAN KHANNA /AFP via Getty Images
Article content
Four former Minneapolis police officers face federal civil rights charges for their role in the arrest and murder of George Floyd, according to court documents unsealed on Friday, showing the Justice Department’s tougher stance in such cases.

A federal grand jury in Minneapolis on Thursday issued a three-count indictment charging Derek Chauvin – the white former officer convicted in Minnesota state court of murdering Floyd – and three fellow former officers of violating his constitutional rights, including his right to have his medical needs attended to.


“The defendants saw George Floyd lying on the ground in clear need of medical care, and willfully failed to aid Floyd,” the indictment says.

Also charged were Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane.

This combination of booking photos provided by the Hennepin County Jail created on June 3, 2020 shows (left to right, from top to bottom) Minneapolis ex-officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Kiernan Lane.
This combination of booking photos provided by the Hennepin County Jail created on June 3, 2020 shows (left to right, from top to bottom) Minneapolis ex-officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Kiernan Lane. PHOTO BY HANDOUT/HENNEPIN COUNTY JAIL /AFP via Getty Images
Attorneys for the four men did not respond to messages seeking comment on the charges.

Thao, Kueng and Lane appeared with their lawyers in federal court in Minneapolis on Friday by video. All three were released on $25,000 bond. Chauvin, who is awaiting a June 25 sentencing hearing on his state convictions, remains in custody.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
In a separate federal indictment unsealed on Friday, Chauvin was also charged with violating the rights of a 14-year-old boy during an arrest in September 2017. Chauvin is accused of holding the teen by the neck and hitting him with a flashlight.

The charges were the latest sign the Department of Justice under new Democratic President Joe Biden is taking a harder line against police abuses, a role that civil rights advocates say the department neglected during Republican Donald Trump’s administration.

In a confrontation captured on video, Chauvin pushed his knee into Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes on May 25, 2020, as he and the three other officers arrested the 46-year-old Black man. Floyd, who was in handcuffs, had been accused of using a fake $20 bill to buy cigarettes at a grocery store.

His death prompted protests against racism and police brutality last year in many cities across the United States and around the world, and reinvigorated the Black Lives Matter movement.

Chauvin was convicted of state murder charges last month. His lawyers on Tuesday requested a new trial, saying there was prosecutorial and jury misconduct and errors of law at trial and that the verdict was contrary to the law.


The federal indictment against the four former officers charged them with depriving Floyd of his liberty and showing “deliberate indifference to his serious medical needs.”

Thao, Kueng and Lane – all of whom were fired and arrested days after Floyd’s death – also face state charges at a trial set for Aug. 23 that they aided and abetted the second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter of Floyd.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland has prioritized cracking down on police misconduct since being confirmed as the nation’s top law enforcement official in March. He has launched investigations into policing practices in Minneapolis and Louisville, Kentucky, where Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot to death by police in her home during a botched raid in March 2020.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is handcuffed to be led away after a jury found him guilty of all charges in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., April 20, 2021 in a still image from video.
Minneapolis jury convicts ex-cop Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is shown in this police booking photo after a jury found him guilty on all counts in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., Tuesday, April 20, 2021. Picture released on Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
FATAH: Will the verdict in George Floyd trial change America?

“The indictments, while certainly not convictions, send an important message to the public that the legal system does provide avenues of recourse for the actions the former officers took that led to the death of Floyd,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

The former officers were charged under a federal statute that provides for a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, but are likely to face less severe sentences if convicted.

The attorneys representing Floyd’s family said in a statement that they are “encouraged by these charges and eager to see continued justice in this historic case that will impact Black citizens and all Americans for generations to come.”

White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Friday said the indictments highlight the need for Congress to pass legislation banning certain police tactics, such as chokeholds.

“It is a reminder, as was the verdict in the Chauvin case just a few weeks ago, that there is still more that needs to be done,” Psaki said at a news briefing. “It is a reminder of the need to put police reform in place.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
Longer sentence possible for Derek Chauvin in George Floyd's murder
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 12, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is shown in a combination of police booking photos after a jury found him guilty on all counts in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., April 20, 2021.
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is shown in a combination of police booking photos after a jury found him guilty on all counts in his trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minn., April 20, 2021. PHOTO BY MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS /Handout via REUTERS
Article content
A Minnesota judge has ruled that aggravating factors were involved in the killing of George Floyd, opening the possibility of a longer sentence for Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis policeman convicted of his murder last month.

A jury found Chauvin, 45, guilty of second and third-degree murder and manslaughter after hearing three weeks of testimony in a highly publicized trial. He is scheduled to be sentenced on June 25.


In a six-page ruling dated Tuesday, District Court Judge Peter Cahill found that prosecutors had shown there were four aggravating factors in the death of Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man.

The judge said Chauvin, who is white, abused his position of trust and authority and treated Floyd with particular cruelty. He committed the crime as part of a group with three other officers and did so with children present, Cahill ruled.

“The slow death of George Floyd occurring over approximately six minutes of his positional asphyxia was particularly cruel in that Mr. Floyd was begging for his life and obviously terrified by the knowledge that he was likely to die but during which the defendant objectively remained indifferent to Mr. Floyd’s pleas,” Cahill wrote.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
Floyd’s death after he was handcuffed on a Minneapolis street with Chauvin’s knee on his neck for more than nine minutes prompted massive protests against racism and police brutality in many U.S. cities and other countries.

Attorneys for Floyd’s family applauded Cahill’s ruling.

“The application of justice in this case offers hope that we will see real change in the relationship between police and people of color by holding officers properly accountable for egregious behavior and for failing to honor the sanctity of all lives,” the attorneys said in a statement.

Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, had no comment when asked for a response.


The other former officers who were at the scene have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death and are set to go on trial on Aug. 23.

Cahill, who presided over the trial, will also sentence Chauvin. He faces a combined maximum 75 years in prison if the sentences run consecutively. State guidelines give judges leeway to impose sentences that are far less harsh.

Prosecutors on April 30 asked Cahill to consider several aggravating circumstances in Floyd’s death so that he could make “an upward sentencing departure” in the case.

While Cahill accepted most of the prosecution’s arguments that aggravating circumstances were present, he rejected one of them, finding that lawyers for the state had failed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Floyd was “particularly vulnerable.”

A ruling by Cahill is pending on a May 4 request by the defence for a new trial. Nelson, Chauvin’s lawyer, argued that his client was deprived of a fair trial because of prosecutorial and jury misconduct and errors of law at the trial. He also argued that the verdict was contrary to the law.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
Judge postpones trial for three ex-cops in George Floyd case: Reports
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Brendan O'Brien and Julia Harte
Publishing date:May 13, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
An image of George Floyd's arrest by Officer Derek Chauvin plays on a screen, on the eighth day of the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis April 7, 2021 in this courtroom sketch.
An image of George Floyd's arrest by Officer Derek Chauvin plays on a screen, on the eighth day of the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis April 7, 2021 in this courtroom sketch. PHOTO BY JANE ROSENBERG /via REUTERS
Article content
A judge in Minneapolis on Thursday postponed the trial of three former policemen accused of taking part in the murder of George Floyd to March 2022, saying the federal case against the men should proceed first, local media reported.

Tou Thao, 25, J. Alexander Kueng, 27, and Thomas Lane, 28 – all fired and arrested days after the 46-year-old Black man was killed on May 25 – have been charged with aiding and abetting the second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter of Floyd.


White former Minneapolis policeman Derek Chauvin was convicted on April 20 of murdering Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes, in a case that marked a milestone in America’s fraught racial history and a rebuke of law enforcement’s treatment of Black Americans. The death, captured on cellphone video, led to protests around the nation and overseas. Lane is white, Kueng is Black and Thao is of Hmong descent.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
A federal grand jury in Minneapolis last Thursday indicted the four former officers on charges of civil rights violations.


During a pretrial motion hearing on Thursday, Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill pushed Thao, Kueng and Lane’s trial from Aug. 23, 2021, to March 7, 2022, according to online court records.

Cahill said he wanted to give the federal case some time to proceed, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

According to other media, Cahill also said he wanted to create more distance between Chauvin’s high-profile trial and his fellow former officers’ trial to lessen the immense publicity.

On Wednesday, Cahill ruled that aggravating factors were involved in the killing, opening the possibility of a longer sentence for Chauvin than the 75 years prescribed by state guidelines. Chauvin, 45, is scheduled to be sentenced on June 25.

On May 25, Kueng and Lane were the first officers to arrive outside the food store where Floyd was accused of passing a counterfeit $20 bill to buy cigarettes. Thao arrived on the scene with Chauvin after Floyd had already been handcuffed.

During Thursday’s pretrial hearing, attorneys for Thao, Kueng and Lane raised concerns that information had been leaked that would taint the jury pool, and that a key witness was coerced into amending his findings.

The attorneys said prosecutors leaked “damning” information to the New York Times about a supposed plan by Chauvin to plead guilty and moved to ask Judge Cahill to sanction prosecutors, including state Attorney General Keith Ellison.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“It is impossible to overstate the magnitude of this misconduct or its prejudicial effect on the defendants’ constitutional due process rights of a fair trial,” attorneys wrote in the motion.

In a statement, Ellison had earlier called the leak allegation “completely false and an outlandish attempt to disparage the prosecution.”

Assistant Attorney General Matthew Frank said during the hearing that he was “sick to my stomach” over the report of a leak, according to the Star Tribune.

Cahill scheduled a hearing in August to determine the source of the leak, the newspaper said.

Thao, Kueng, and Lane were not present at Thursday’s hearing, and no cameras were permitted in the courtroom.

Thao’s defense attorney also asked Cahill to drop all charges against his client, and to rule that Hennepin County Medical Examiner Andrew Baker was coerced into saying Floyd died of asphyxiation.

According to a motion the attorney filed before the hearing, Dr. Roger Mitchell, Washington, D.C.’s chief medical examiner, had been planning to write an opinion piece critical of Baker’s initial findings. Thao’s legal team claimed Baker changed his findings to avoid controversy, and that prosecutors knew about it.

It was unknown when Cahill would rule on that motion.
1620989059078.png
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,725
3,680
113
Twin Moose Creek
Interesting development on the mob justice trials

 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
George Floyd's family lobbies Biden for U.S. police reform on anniversary of death
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Jeff Mason and Nick Pfosi
Publishing date:May 25, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
People gather for a memorial rally and march in Brooklyn in honour of George Floyd on the one year anniversary of his death on May 25, 2021.
People gather for a memorial rally and march in Brooklyn in honour of George Floyd on the one year anniversary of his death on May 25, 2021. PHOTO BY SPENCER PLATT /Getty Images
Article content
WASHINGTON/MINNEAPOLIS — A year after his killing sparked a national reckoning over U.S. racial injustice, George Floyd’s relatives met on Tuesday with President Joe Biden at the White House and with lawmakers on Capitol Hill to urge passage of police reform legislation in their loved one’s name.

Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man who died in handcuffs with his neck pinned to a Minneapolis street under a white police officer’s knee, become the face of a national movement against police brutality and bias in the U.S. criminal justice system.


His dying words, “I can’t breathe,” have echoed as a slogan in street demonstrations that convulsed the United States and the world last summer in the midst of the coronavirus epidemic.

But Monday’s private Oval Office visit marked the first time any of Floyd’s family had been hosted at the White House, occupied since January by a Democratic administration.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
Biden’s Republican predecessor, Donald Trump, was widely criticized for political rhetoric seen as inflaming racial tensions heightened in the aftermath of Floyd’s death.


Floyd’s relatives used their pilgrimage to Washington on the anniversary of his death to lobby Biden and Congress for the enactment of legislation ensuring the just treatment of minorities by law enforcement.

In March, the Democratic-majority House of Representatives passed a bill, dubbed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, to ban contentious police tactics such as “choke holds,” while making it easier to sue individual police officers for unlawful conduct.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers has been working to hammer out a compromise to win enough Republican support to ensure passage in the Senate, where Democrats hold a razor-thin margin of control.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“If you can make federal laws to protect the (national) bird, which is the bald eagle, you can make federal laws to protect people of color,” Floyd’s brother Philonise said on the White House driveway he after five other family members met with Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris.

He described Biden as supportive, calling him “a genuine guy.”

“He did let us know that he supports passing the bill, but he wants to make sure that is the right bill and not a rushed bill,” said Floyd’s nephew Brandon Williams.


Moments before departing the White House by helicopter a short time later for a flight back to his home state of Delaware, Biden told reporters he had spoken to negotiators on the bill and said he was “hopeful that sometime after Memorial Day we’ll have an agreement.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“We have to act,” Biden said in a statement issued by the White House. “The battle for the soul of America has been a constant push and pull between the American ideal that we’re all created equal and the harsh reality that racism has long torn us apart.”

Earlier in the day, Floyd’s family, including his daughter, Gianna, and two other brothers, met with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other lawmakers who promised to secure passage of the legislation.

Senator Tim Scott, the lead Republican negotiator, told reporters on Tuesday that a main point of contention remained qualified immunity, a legal doctrine that shields individual police officers from lawsuits in certain circumstances.

Republicans oppose provisions in the bill rolling back such immunity, while many liberal Democrats say they would only support a bill that abolished it.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“We have a long way to go still, but it’s starting to take form,” Scott said.

In Minneapolis, a foundation created in Floyd’s memory by some in his family organized an afternoon of music and food in a park near the downtown courtroom where Derek Chauvin, the former officer, was convicted last month of murdering Floyd.

Chauvin, 45, faces up to 40 years in prison when he is sentenced on June 25. Three other officers at the scene have pleaded not guilty to aiding and abetting Chauvin, and will go on trial next year. The Minneapolis Police Department fired all four officers the day after Floyd was killed.

Later on Tuesday, mourners were set to gather for a candlelight vigil at the stretch of road where Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck. Darnella Frazier, a teenage bystander, recorded the killing on her cellphone, uploading video to Facebook that horrified people around the world. Floyd had been suspected of passing a counterfeit $20 bill to buy cigarettes.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
By the afternoon, small crowds were gathering at the intersection for a festive, sunny afternoon of music and children’s activities. A man set out paint ready to create a fresh mural in the square, which has been closed to most vehicle traffic for a year and is filled with flowers and art commemorating Floyd and other Black victims of police violence.

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey were due to join activists in a city park for nine minutes and 29 seconds of silence in memory of Floyd’s murder.

Demonstrations were planned in New York City. Earlier on Tuesday, Shaun Donovan, a Democratic candidate for mayor, was among a group of five protesters arrested for blocking traffic near a major tunnel into Manhattan.

Legislation has been pursued in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia to increase the accountability or oversight of police, and 24 states have enacted new laws, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
1622039584695.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
113
Derek Chauvin seeks probation for George Floyd death, state wants 30 years
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Jun 02, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
This screenshot obtained from video feed via Court TV, shows former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listening to the verdict in his trial in the killing of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 20, 2021.
This screenshot obtained from video feed via Court TV, shows former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listening to the verdict in his trial in the killing of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 20, 2021. PHOTO BY SCREENSHOT /AFP via Getty Images
Article content
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin asked a judge on Wednesday for probation after being convicted for the murder of George Floyd, while the prosecution said his crime “shocked the Nation’s conscience” and he should be imprisoned for 30 years.

In a motion filed with Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill, lawyer Eric Nelson said Chauvin’s actions in pinning Floyd to the pavement during an arrest was “best described as an error made in good faith” based on his training.


“Mr. Chauvin asks the Court to look beyond its findings, to his background, his lack of criminal history, his amenability to probation, to the unusual facts of this case, and to his being a product of a ‘broken’ system,” Nelson wrote.

The lawyer asked the judge for a so-called dispositional departure resulting in probation or a downward durational departure, which he said would lead to a sentence less strict than the 128 months to 180 months suggested by state guidelines.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
In their own filing, prosecutors argued that Chauvin acted with cruelty, among other aggravating factors, and therefore deserved twice the upper limit of the sentencing range, or 30 years in prison.

“His actions traumatized the community, prompting an outpouring of grief and protest across Minneapolis and the State. And his actions shocked the conscience of the Nation,” prosecutors in the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office wrote.


A Minneapolis jury in April found Chauvin, 45, guilty of second- and third-degree murder and manslaughter after hearing three weeks of testimony in a highly publicized trial. He is scheduled to be sentenced on June 25.

He is being held at a maximum security prison in Oak Park Heights, Minnesota, while awaiting sentencing.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Last month, Cahill found that prosecutors had shown there were four aggravating factors in the death of Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man.

The judge said Chauvin, who is white, abused his position of trust and authority and treated Floyd with particular cruelty. He committed the crime as part of a group with three other officers and did so with children present, Cahill ruled.


Floyd’s May 25, 2020, death – after he was handcuffed on a Minneapolis street with Chauvin’s knee on his neck for more than nine minutes – prompted massive protests against racism and police brutality in many U.S. cities and other countries.

In Wednesday’s motion, Nelson said the fact that the officers on the scene called for an ambulance “served to mitigate any cruelty” in the treatment of Floyd. Chauvin, he noted, remained on the scene until medical assistance arrived.

“Mr. Chauvin has established that he is particularly amenable to probation and is a prime candidate for a stringent probationary sentence plus time served,” Nelson wrote.

Chauvin has been in prison since his April 20 conviction.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,725
3,680
113
Twin Moose Creek

PICTURED: Armed black man, 32, with long rap sheet - including 20 arrests - who was wanted for violating probation for aggravated robbery before he was shot dead by Minneapolis cops, sparking a night of protests at dismantled George Floyd Square

  • US Marshals task force moved in on Winston Boogie Smith, 32, wanted for possession of a firearm by a felon, outside a parking garage at around 2pm on Thursday in the Uptown neighborhood, 3 miles away from George Floyd Square
  • Smith, who was in a parked car, 'produced a handgun resulting in task force members firing upon the subject,' Sheriff's Department said. Officers attempted to revive the suspect but he died at the scene
  • The shooting came after crews began dismantling concrete barriers around the so-called 'autonomous zone' of George Floyd Square, which were set up as a memorial after he was murdered in May 2020
  • Protests had already broken out among activists angered by the removal of the shrine when news of the shooting in Uptown reached them. People soon gathered in Uptown, crowding around the crime scene, before they barricaded off Lake Street and Girard Avenue where a dumpster was torched
  • Rioters blocked off the streets with cars and motorcycles before police arrived, firing tear gas on them
  • Infighting and looting broke out across the city into the early hours of the morning
By ADAM SCHRADER and HOLDEN WALTER-WARNER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and WIRES

PUBLISHED: 02:05 EDT, 4 June 2021 | UPDATED: 11:21 EDT, 4 June 2021
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mowich

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,725
3,680
113
Twin Moose Creek

Second night of unrest in Minneapolis: Vigils descend into riots as protesters block traffic and set fires in clashes with police over fatal shooting of 32-year-old who investigators said fired a gun

  • Winston Boogie Smith Jr, 32, was fatally shot by police in Minneapolis on Thursday while sat in his car
  • Authorities say he fired a gun at deputies before he was killed and claim there is no footage of the incident
  • Family and friends of Smith are calling for footage from surveillance cameras to be released to them
  • At a vigil for Smith on Saturday, buildings were vandalized and looted, and nine people were arrested on charges including suspicion of riot, assault, and arson and damage to property
By GEMMA PARRY FOR MAILONLINE and DAILYMAIL.COM REPORTER

PUBLISHED: 06:36 EDT, 5 June 2021 | UPDATED: 11:13 EDT, 5 June 2021