WE really need to get rid of this guy

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,046
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Vancouver Island
BUT the entire population north of Campbell River including Gold River and Tahsis up to Cape Scott (and Zeballos) is less than that of Port Alberni and they both have one seat!
That is my point. Large rural areas are underrepresented.So we have one riding larger than the entire lower mainland that had dozens of seats. Effectively we have no vote in what happens. What might work well for Vancouver is often disastrous for multiple communities around the province . The areas where wealth is generated. Take the carbon scam tax(please), not a big deal in Vancouver because they have taxpayer subsidized transit and electric cars are mostly adequate for them if they don't leave town. Now someone in Pt Hardy has no access to transit, natural gas and must drive many hours for medical services is forced to pay a huge amount of money in a scam tax just to get basic services. Even where I live, north of Qualicum Beach we have one bus going south around 10:30 and returning around 1800. Can't use that for work.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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LILLEY: Trudeau ignores Liberal Party's racist and anti-immigrant past
While both parties are supportive of immigration now, that wasn’t always the case

Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Jul 20, 2021 • 13 hours ago • 3 minute read • 136 Comments
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers remarks at a press conference at a housing construction site in Brampton on July 19, 2021.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers remarks at a press conference at a housing construction site in Brampton on July 19, 2021. PHOTO BY COLE BURSTON /REUTERS
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Justin Trudeau stood before the cameras on Monday and made a factually incorrect and demonstrably false statement. It’s one that few will call him out on because most Canadians don’t know their history and Trudeau’s lie fits the Liberal and media narrative in this country.

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“The Liberal Party has always been the party of immigration,” Trudeau said.


Really? That’s not what the historic record says.

Did you know that Liberal prime ministers in the past have banned Black immigration from Canada, turned away a boatload of Jews fleeing Nazi Germany, imposed crippling taxes on immigrants from China, and imposed a policy that effectively banned immigration from India and Pakistan?

That last one should be especially pertinent for the woman from the local Punjabi media outlet who asked Trudeau the question that led to his answer. The Liberal policy banning immigration from India was developed by two Liberal prime ministers both featured on our money today.

This doesn’t mean the Liberals of today are anti-immigration, far from it, but neither are the other parties. The implication from Trudeau’s comment is that the Liberals have always been on the side of the angels while his opponents, the Conservatives, have been anti-immigration.

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While both parties are supportive of immigration now, that wasn’t the case in the past and given that Liberals have been in power for most of Canada’s history, they have more skeletons in their closet.

In August 1911, Liberal Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier signed an order in council regulation which banned Black immigration for a year.
In August 1911, Liberal Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier signed an order in council regulation which banned Black immigration for a year.
In 1952, the government of Liberal Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent agreed to allow American troops to be stationed in Canada for the manning of radar stations only as long as Black soldiers made up less than 10% of the troop total.

In August 1911, Liberal Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier signed an order in council regulation which banned Black immigration for a year. The order stated that Black immigrants were “deemed unsuitable to the climate and requirements of Canada.” The regulation was repealed in October of that year after the Conservatives won the election and Robert Borden had become prime minister.

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Laurier even hired agents to warn off Black farmers in the United States who thought of moving north to Canada as free land was being handed out there.


This wasn’t the only racist immigration policy Laurier pushed. While the Chinese head tax was instituted by the Conservatives under Sir John A. Macdonald, Laurier raised the tax over the course of a few years from $50 in 1896 to $500 in 1903.

In 1908 a young civil servant working in the Laurier government proposed stopping immigration from India by passing a regulation that said no one could immigrate to Canada except from their country of origin on a ship that did not need to refuel. That stopped immigration from India and what would become Pakistan.

That young civil servant’s name was William Lyon Mackenzie King.

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Once in office himself, Mackenzie King put in an actual ban on Chinese immigration and his government’s position on Jewish immigration has been described as “none is too many.” In fact, in 1939, the Mackenzie King government turned back a ship with more than 900 passengers, mostly Jews, fleeing Hitler’s Germany.

Many of the passengers perished in the Holocaust.

By comparison, it was the Conservative government of John Diefenbaker, the first PM of German ancestry, which in 1962 stopped race and ethnicity from being the driving forces of Canada’s immigration policies. That happened under the stewardship of Ellen Fairclough, the first female cabinet minister in Canada.


The Conservatives also elected the first Black MP in Lincoln Alexander, the first Chinese-Canadian MP with Douglas Jung, the first Muslim MP Rahim Jaffer, the first Hindu MP Deepak Obhrai, and the first Japanese-Canadian MP Bev Oda.

The list goes on and on, but you get the point.

Playing to issues of race and immigration isn’t new in Canadian politics but voters should know that while Trudeau wants them to think the Liberals have always been the good guys and the Conservatives always the bad guys, the true record is far different.

blilley@postmedia.com
1626854819356.png
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,501
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Regina, Saskatchewan
That is my point. Large rural areas are underrepresented.So we have one riding larger than the entire lower mainland that had dozens of seats. Effectively we have no vote in what happens. What might work well for Vancouver is often disastrous for multiple communities around the province . The areas where wealth is generated. Take the carbon scam tax(please), not a big deal in Vancouver because they have taxpayer subsidized transit and electric cars are mostly adequate for them if they don't leave town. Now someone in Pt Hardy has no access to transit, natural gas and must drive many hours for medical services is forced to pay a huge amount of money in a scam tax just to get basic services. Even where I live, north of Qualicum Beach we have one bus going south around 10:30 and returning around 1800. Can't use that for work.
You have buses? We use to have buses, & now we don’t. There’s some crappy city hourly buses, and some select private sporadic buses on a few route outside the major centres & that’s it for Sask. Nothing you’d be able to rely on.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
21,596
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B.C.
You have buses? We use to have buses, & now we don’t. There’s some crappy city hourly buses, and some select private sporadic buses on a few route outside the major centres & that’s it for Sask. Nothing you’d be able to rely on.
Sorry for bad memories , but didn’t busses give you the Humbolt disaster ?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,270
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Moccasin Flats
You have buses? We use to have buses, & now we don’t. There’s some crappy city hourly buses, and some select private sporadic buses on a few route outside the major centres & that’s it for Sask. Nothing you’d be able to rely on.
You can ride transit from Britania Beach to Harrison Hot Springs. That would be at least a two hour drive by car.
 
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JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,105
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Vernon, B.C.
That is my point. Large rural areas are underrepresented.So we have one riding larger than the entire lower mainland that had dozens of seats. Effectively we have no vote in what happens. What might work well for Vancouver is often disastrous for multiple communities around the province . The areas where wealth is generated. Take the carbon scam tax(please), not a big deal in Vancouver because they have taxpayer subsidized transit and electric cars are mostly adequate for them if they don't leave town. Now someone in Pt Hardy has no access to transit, natural gas and must drive many hours for medical services is forced to pay a huge amount of money in a scam tax just to get basic services. Even where I live, north of Qualicum Beach we have one bus going south around 10:30 and returning around 1800. Can't use that for work.
The North Island riding produces a lot of raw materials.............wood, fish and ore, but how does the $ value compare to that of the goods manufactured in one of the urban ridings?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,270
4,336
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Moccasin Flats
The North Island riding produces a lot of raw materials.............wood, fish and ore, but how does the $ value compare to that of the goods manufactured in one of the urban ridings?
It goes by per capita and that knowledge isn't hard to acquire.
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,046
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Vancouver Island
The North Island riding produces a lot of raw materials.............wood, fish and ore, but how does the $ value compare to that of the goods manufactured in one of the urban ridings?
None of those goods are going to be produced in the city if the government prevents the supplying of raw material. But most citiots can't figure that out. We have city people making rules on farming and logging that have never seen a cow shit in real life, or know what caulk boots are.
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,046
2,516
113
Vancouver Island
You have buses? We use to have buses, & now we don’t. There’s some crappy city hourly buses, and some select private sporadic buses on a few route outside the major centres & that’s it for Sask. Nothing you’d be able to rely on.
We have a bus. It stops about 2k from joining up with the bus from Courtenay. Different Regional District so obviously no one needs to go there.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
885
694
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That is my point. Large rural areas are underrepresented.So we have one riding larger than the entire lower mainland that had dozens of seats. Effectively we have no vote in what happens. What might work well for Vancouver is often disastrous for multiple communities around the province . The areas where wealth is generated. Take the carbon scam tax(please), not a big deal in Vancouver because they have taxpayer subsidized transit and electric cars are mostly adequate for them if they don't leave town. Now someone in Pt Hardy has no access to transit, natural gas and must drive many hours for medical services is forced to pay a huge amount of money in a scam tax just to get basic services. Even where I live, north of Qualicum Beach we have one bus going south around 10:30 and returning around 1800. Can't use that for work.
If you elect an independent at least you know the one vote is going for something your riding believes in. Elect an established party and they will vote as the party says to vote.
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,046
2,516
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Vancouver Island
If you elect an independent at least you know the one vote is going for something your riding believes in. Elect an established party and they will vote as the party says to vote.
Yeah, tired of politicians telling us what their party is going to do to us instead of telling the party what we expect.
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,046
2,516
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Vancouver Island
The North Island riding produces a lot of raw materials.............wood, fish and ore, but how does the $ value compare to that of the goods manufactured in one of the urban ridings?
More important is the number of city jobs provided by resource communities with the need for supplies and technology. Or even for transportation.
 
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