Trucker protest at U.S. border crossing reportedly several kilometres long

spaminator

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Randy Hillier hit with 'Freedom Convoy' charges including assaulting police
The MPP said he didn’t know what led to the assault charge.

Author of the article:Aedan Helmer
Publishing date:Mar 28, 2022 • 9 hours ago • 4 minute read
Randy Hillier pictured at Ottawa police headquarters on Monday where he turned himself in to police.
Randy Hillier pictured at Ottawa police headquarters on Monday where he turned himself in to police. PHOTO BY TONY CALDWELL /Postmedia
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Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston MPP Randy Hillier was released from court with a long list of conditions after turning himself into Ottawa police Monday morning to face nine criminal charges related to the weeks-long “Freedom Convoy” occupation of downtown streets.

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One of those charges alleges Hillier, 64, encouraged his numerous social media followers to flood police non-emergency lines during the peak of the demonstration, when Ottawa police were pleading with the public to keep those phone lines open.

Hillier’s tweet on Feb. 19 reached his 56,000 followers, and over the next six days the Ottawa Police Service non-emergency line logged 274 malicious calls, according to an outline of the Crown’s case against Hillier, while there was a “surge” in similar calls to the city’s 911 line.

Hillier told his Twitter followers at the time to “keep calling” the non-emergency line and said that “in a democracy expressing yourself is a fundamental freedom.”

The assault charge outlined during Monday’s court session alleges Hillier, marching with a group that included PPC Leader Maxime Bernier, ignored an officer’s directions as the protest converged on Parliament Hill, then “threw” a metal gate out of the way.

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Hillier shouted “Let’s go!” as he used his shoulder and hip to push the officer out of the way while a group of demonstrators forced their way through the barricade, according to the Crown’s outline of the case.

About 10 hours after turning himself in at Ottawa police headquarters, puffing on a cigarette and telling reporters he was a freedom fighter being prosecuted for dissenting views, Hillier was released from the Ottawa courthouse and driven back to his home in Perth.

He is to reside there under the supervision of his wife, Jane Hillier, who will act as his court-approved surety after posting a $25,000 bond, while Hillier posted an additional $10,000 bond.

Hillier told Justice of the Peace Louise Logue he understood and agreed to comply with the conditions, which include a list of restrictions negotiated throughout the day between the Crown’s office and Hillier’s Ottawa-based lawyer, David Anber.

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Anber said Hillier was notified by Ottawa police of the charges on Sunday.

“When Randy was notified that they wanted him to turn himself in, he promptly made arrangements to do so and was in there bright and early this morning,” said Anber, who expects Hillier to fight the charges at trial.

“He denies committing any of these offences and we’re going to vigorously fight them.”

Hillier, a visible presence during the three-week convoy protests, is now formally facing two counts of mischief, two of counselling to commit mischief, one of counselling someone to commit an indictable offence, three counts of resisting or obstructing a public or peace officer, and one of assaulting a public or peace officer.

He denied the assault charge when asked by reporters outside the police station Monday morning.

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“I only ever greeted people … with love and affection and embrace and handshakes. So unless handshakes or warm embraces are now considered assault, I have no idea,” he said.

In his outline of the facts behind each of the criminal counts, Assistant Crown Attorney Tim Wightman alleged Hillier was directly involved in honking truck horns, encouraging truckers to join the swelling protest, directing vehicles into the downtown core and instructing them where they should illegally park.

Hillier was “actively encouraging” others to join the demonstration even after multiple emergency orders were put into effect, Wightman told court, and he directed people to bring fuel and food to the protesters as the “occupation” wore on.

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Hillier was released on another condition that effectively bars him from entering the downtown core, except for court appearances or to consult with his lawyer, and he is forbidden from contacting a growing list of convoy participants and accused organizers — a list that now includes at least 18 names.

Anber argued with the Crown against one condition of Hillier’s release that restricts his use of social media.

Wightman said Hillier’s social media accounts were his “tool of choice to advance dangerous rhetoric,” and argued that Hillier should be barred from posting to social media any critiques of COVID-19 regulations, masking requirements or anything related to the “anti-vaccine cause”.

Anber argued that condition would prevent Hillier from performing his duties as an elected official.

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“(Hillier) would be prohibited — as a member of the provincial legislature — from being able to comment on vaccine mandate policy, on mask mandate policy and on other forms of policy that touch upon those public health measures that were brought in by the Ford government,” Anber said. “Mr. Hillier was elected to perform those duties.”

The judge sided with the Crown and imposed the order, and though Anber emphasized his respect for the presiding judicial officer, “I believe she got it wrong,” he said following the hearing. “But Mr. Hillier will certainly comply with it until and unless he chooses to seek a bail review in Superior Court.”

Anber suggested Hillier may appeal the condition and may seek a bail review. He took issue with the Crown’s contention that it has built a strong case against his client.

“I do not characterize their case as strong — at all,” Anber said. “There are numerous issues we plan on challenging on all of the counts.”

— With files from Taylor Blewett

ahelmer@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/helmera
 

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Edmonton
Randy Hillier hit with 'Freedom Convoy' charges including assaulting police
The MPP said he didn’t know what led to the assault charge.

Author of the article:Aedan Helmer
Publishing date:Mar 28, 2022 • 9 hours ago • 4 minute read
Randy Hillier pictured at Ottawa police headquarters on Monday where he turned himself in to police.
Randy Hillier pictured at Ottawa police headquarters on Monday where he turned himself in to police. PHOTO BY TONY CALDWELL /Postmedia
Article content
Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston MPP Randy Hillier was released from court with a long list of conditions after turning himself into Ottawa police Monday morning to face nine criminal charges related to the weeks-long “Freedom Convoy” occupation of downtown streets.

Advertisement 2
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
One of those charges alleges Hillier, 64, encouraged his numerous social media followers to flood police non-emergency lines during the peak of the demonstration, when Ottawa police were pleading with the public to keep those phone lines open.

Hillier’s tweet on Feb. 19 reached his 56,000 followers, and over the next six days the Ottawa Police Service non-emergency line logged 274 malicious calls, according to an outline of the Crown’s case against Hillier, while there was a “surge” in similar calls to the city’s 911 line.

Hillier told his Twitter followers at the time to “keep calling” the non-emergency line and said that “in a democracy expressing yourself is a fundamental freedom.”

The assault charge outlined during Monday’s court session alleges Hillier, marching with a group that included PPC Leader Maxime Bernier, ignored an officer’s directions as the protest converged on Parliament Hill, then “threw” a metal gate out of the way.

Advertisement 3
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Hillier shouted “Let’s go!” as he used his shoulder and hip to push the officer out of the way while a group of demonstrators forced their way through the barricade, according to the Crown’s outline of the case.

About 10 hours after turning himself in at Ottawa police headquarters, puffing on a cigarette and telling reporters he was a freedom fighter being prosecuted for dissenting views, Hillier was released from the Ottawa courthouse and driven back to his home in Perth.

He is to reside there under the supervision of his wife, Jane Hillier, who will act as his court-approved surety after posting a $25,000 bond, while Hillier posted an additional $10,000 bond.

Hillier told Justice of the Peace Louise Logue he understood and agreed to comply with the conditions, which include a list of restrictions negotiated throughout the day between the Crown’s office and Hillier’s Ottawa-based lawyer, David Anber.

Advertisement 4
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Anber said Hillier was notified by Ottawa police of the charges on Sunday.

“When Randy was notified that they wanted him to turn himself in, he promptly made arrangements to do so and was in there bright and early this morning,” said Anber, who expects Hillier to fight the charges at trial.

“He denies committing any of these offences and we’re going to vigorously fight them.”

Hillier, a visible presence during the three-week convoy protests, is now formally facing two counts of mischief, two of counselling to commit mischief, one of counselling someone to commit an indictable offence, three counts of resisting or obstructing a public or peace officer, and one of assaulting a public or peace officer.

He denied the assault charge when asked by reporters outside the police station Monday morning.

Advertisement 5
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
“I only ever greeted people … with love and affection and embrace and handshakes. So unless handshakes or warm embraces are now considered assault, I have no idea,” he said.

In his outline of the facts behind each of the criminal counts, Assistant Crown Attorney Tim Wightman alleged Hillier was directly involved in honking truck horns, encouraging truckers to join the swelling protest, directing vehicles into the downtown core and instructing them where they should illegally park.

Hillier was “actively encouraging” others to join the demonstration even after multiple emergency orders were put into effect, Wightman told court, and he directed people to bring fuel and food to the protesters as the “occupation” wore on.

Advertisement 6
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Hillier was released on another condition that effectively bars him from entering the downtown core, except for court appearances or to consult with his lawyer, and he is forbidden from contacting a growing list of convoy participants and accused organizers — a list that now includes at least 18 names.

Anber argued with the Crown against one condition of Hillier’s release that restricts his use of social media.

Wightman said Hillier’s social media accounts were his “tool of choice to advance dangerous rhetoric,” and argued that Hillier should be barred from posting to social media any critiques of COVID-19 regulations, masking requirements or anything related to the “anti-vaccine cause”.

Anber argued that condition would prevent Hillier from performing his duties as an elected official.

Advertisement 7
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
“(Hillier) would be prohibited — as a member of the provincial legislature — from being able to comment on vaccine mandate policy, on mask mandate policy and on other forms of policy that touch upon those public health measures that were brought in by the Ford government,” Anber said. “Mr. Hillier was elected to perform those duties.”

The judge sided with the Crown and imposed the order, and though Anber emphasized his respect for the presiding judicial officer, “I believe she got it wrong,” he said following the hearing. “But Mr. Hillier will certainly comply with it until and unless he chooses to seek a bail review in Superior Court.”

Anber suggested Hillier may appeal the condition and may seek a bail review. He took issue with the Crown’s contention that it has built a strong case against his client.

“I do not characterize their case as strong — at all,” Anber said. “There are numerous issues we plan on challenging on all of the counts.”

— With files from Taylor Blewett

ahelmer@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/helmera
Idiot!!
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
The only issue with this is that Trudeau is "conveniently" isolating. His kid has Covid. If my kid had Covid I'd be with them too, even if I didn't have to isolate.

But I am of the opinion that Trudeau can't hide over this (possible security threat aside as there WERE posts out there threatening violence). He needs to step up. Not that I expect him to, he's a dick like that.
Trudeau’s isolating location under the PriMinisterial Cottage (known as Parliament #2) has finally been shown: Dun na na nuh nuh na na na na nuh nuh nananuhhh Batpeople…batpeoples….
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