Scheer going to India to 'repair' relationship after 'disastrous' Trudeau trip

Ron in Regina

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When was the last time you were on the w. coast?
30 years ago, flying out’a Fort Nelson (I think) in a winter storm supposedly pointed towards Calgary, but the roller coaster turbulence was so bad we eventually got diverted to Vancouver so they cracked open the liquor cabinet on the plane to keep the peace as we rode out most of the rest of the storm on the tarmac in Vancouver before hours later getting clearance to eventually fly back over the Rockies to Calgary where they poured a bunch of us oilfield workers off the plane. Does that count? Free booze on a plane to keep everyone chilled out isn’t a modern answer but it worked at the time.

(Crazy flight in a crazy time. No Hindus or Sihks or members of Green Peace on that flight, but by the time the storm passed the airline could have paid for the Av-Gas from their recyclables….)
Nothing new there. In December 2013, Singh became the first sitting member of a Western legislature to be barred from travelling to India. He was denied a visa by the Indian government while he was a member of the provincial parliament (MPP) in Ontario.
Again, nothing new there either. It’s relevant & significant, but not new. The non-Coalition Coalition that’s definitely not a Coalition Coalition. Justin & Jagmeet came out’a the closet as the Trucker Convoy was still rolling towards Ottawa & those two couldn’t help but finish each other’s sentences.

We’ve got kids in the interior, but no reason to go to the West Coast.
 

petros

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30 years ago, flying out’a Fort Nelson (I think) in a winter storm supposedly pointed towards Calgary, but the roller coaster turbulence was so bad we eventually got diverted to Vancouver so they cracked open the liquor cabinet on the plane to keep the peace as we rode out most of the rest of the storm on the tarmac in Vancouver before hours later getting clearance to eventually fly back over the Rockies to Calgary where they poured a bunch of us oilfield workers off the plane. Does that count? Free booze on a plane to keep everyone chilled out isn’t a modern answer but it worked at the time.

(Crazy flight in a crazy time. No Hindus or Sihks on that flight, but by the time the storm passed the airline could have paid for the Av-Gas from their recyclables….)

Nothing new there. In December 2013, Singh became the first sitting member of a Western legislature to be barred from travelling to India. He was denied a visa by the Indian government while he was a member of the provincial parliament (MPP) in Ontario.

Again, nothing new there either. It’s relevant & significant, but not new. The non-Coalition Coalition that’s definitely not a Coalition Coalition. Justin & Jagmeet came out’a the closet as the Trucker Convoy was still rolling towards Ottawa & those two couldn’t help but finish each other’s sentences.

We’ve got kids in the interior, but no reason to go to the West Coast.
Ah, so no wandering around the cities. You can go to several countries in one day.
 
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55Mercury

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Newsflash

Trudeau further alienates a billion people by calling Buddah a fat bastard.
I wrote this on my other forum. A guy thought I was serious and demanded I post a link to the story where Trudeau says this!

You can't make this stuff up, folks!
I know how tedious it is to have to read every damn word, Tee

hope this gets you up to speed.

;?)
 
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Ron in Regina

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As a city of tents sprang up outside India’s capital city New Delhi in December 2020, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau waded into a debate around protests taking place halfway across the world.

From Ottawa, he promised that Canada would “always stand up” for the right to peacefully protest….& then Honk-Honk Emergencies Act occurred…but that’s a hypocritically similar story for a different thread.
1695519150611.jpeg“We believe in the importance of dialogue and that’s why we have reached out through multiple means directly to the Indian authorities to highlight our concerns,” he said (That one didn’t age well in light of the Trucker Convoy though, did it?).

Trudeau was responding to concerns among Canada’s significant Sikh diaspora that the Indian government was cracking down on farmers protesting a new agricultural policy. His comments were met with a sharp reaction from India, where the government summoned the Canadian ambassador over the issue.

This diplomatic spat (Post-Bollywood Tickle-Trunk & Pre-Current Allegations made headlines, and was just one example of how the effects of domestic politics and policies in India are spurring frustrations, fear and what one expert called “mounting tensions” among members of the diaspora communities in Canada.
1695519195441.jpegAnd in the days since Trudeau rose in the House of Commons saying Canadian authorities are investigating “potential links” between agents of the Indian government and the murder of Canadian Sikh leader Hardeep Singh Nijjar, there has been renewed focus on the challenges of negotiating an evolving relationship with India.

In particular, how should Canada navigate ties with an aspiring global superpower in the years since the Indian farmers’ movement galvanized the diaspora? Evidence-less allegations probably wasn’t the best path, but it’s consistent with using Canada as a cautionary tale for other nations.
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In 2020 and 2021, Indian farmers, mostly led by Sikh farmers from the northern state of Punjab, camped outside of New Delhi for over a year. They were demanding the repeal of a series of laws they said gave greater control to giant corporations over farming.

Meanwhile, this hadn’t affected the parking situation in Ottawa, and thousands of people took part in solidarity marches in Canadian cities.
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Major cities like Toronto and Vancouver saw members of the Sikh diaspora leading protests, with an indefinite sit-in outside the Indian high commission. Canadian politicians from Trudeau and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh to then-Conservative leader Erin O’Toole expressed solidarity with protesters.

“I think diaspora communities have always cared about politics at home,” said Sanjay Ruparelia, Jarislowsky Democracy Chair at Toronto Metropolitan University.

The Indian diaspora in Canada has been divided, between those who are ardent supporters of India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and those who oppose him.
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“Many would describe him (Modi) as a polarizing figure,” Ruparelia said. “Those who support him support him avidly. They champion him and think of him as the greatest leader post-independence India has had. Those who oppose him oppose both his government, his actions, but also the ideology of the Hindu Nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).”

“Members of the Sikh community say that the divisive politics is what they have been confronted with, that they are trying to resist, and that is feeding into the conflict. And I think that’s the worrying thing as we see there’s mounting tensions within the Indian diaspora,” Ruparelia said.

Prominent political voices in India have also criticized Trudeau for what they call “vote-bank politics” and have accused Canada of not taking concerns around “Khalistani extremists” operating on Canadian soil seriously….and on a positive note Trudeau has united more Indians with Modi against Trudeau than anyone would have thought possible even a week ago.
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On Wednesday, the Indian government issued an advisory for Indian nationals in Canada in view of “growing anti-India activities and politically-condoned hate crimes and criminal violence in Canada” and Indian media reports have said “anti-India slogans” and slogans against Modi were written on the walls of some Hindu temples in Canada.

Just days before Nijjar’s murder, a Sikh parade in Brampton, Ont., displayed a flotilla on the assassination of former Indian prime minister Indira Gandhi. Indira Gandhi, India’s first and only female prime minister, was assassinated by her Sikh bodyguards in 1984 after she ordered an attack on the Golden Temple. She had said that Sikh militants were camped out in the Golden Temple, which is one of Sikhism’s most revered sites.

The Indian government reacted sharply, saying this was not good for the relationship between the countries.
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Canada’s ambassador in India, Cameron MacKay, was quick to condemn the parade.

“There is no place in Canada for hate or for the glorification of violence. I categorically condemn these activities.”

But many diaspora groups say the growing tensions reflect bigger worries about influence in Canadian society and politics.

In particular, some groups have pointed to Hindu nationalism, which promotes the idea that India is essentially a nation of and for Hindus. Groups and individuals associated with the ideology have been implicated in violence against minorities. Experts believe there has been a rise in such violence, particularly aimed at Muslims, since Modi took office in 2014.
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Human Rights Watch, in its 2023 World Report, said about India, “The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led government continued its systematic discrimination and stigmatization of religious and other minorities, particularly Muslims. BJP supporters increasingly committed violent attacks against targeted groups.”

In one such example last month, a railway police officer in India shot dead three Muslim passengers and his superior officer. He proclaimed that only those who supported Modi had a right to stay in India.

“Over the past year, diasporic South Asian and other civil society organizations have been sounding alarm bells and calling on the Trudeau government and the opposition to pay heed to the dangerous build-up of support for the Hindu ethnonationalism of the current government of India on Canadian soil. But these alerts have gone unheeded,” a statement prepared by the South Asian Diaspora Action Collective (SADAC), and signed by several other organizations, said.
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SADAC pointed to several incidents they say indicate a growing Hindu nationalist sentiment in Canada, including allegations of death threats against a Toronto filmmaker.

In November last year, a Liberal MP also faced questions and concerns from some activists for attending an event raising a flag associated with the far-right organization Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS) on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.

The group is closely associated with Modi and his party and has been criticized for its views on minorities, particularly Muslims, in India.

A member of the group assassinated Mahatma Gandhi in 1948, and the BBC last year described the group as ” the ideological fountainhead of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).”

In March, the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM) and the World Sikh Organization (WSO) issued a joint report that said the RSS was actively operating on Canadian soil, as well as in the U.S. and Europe.

That report, which stressed that the RSS’s ideologies “in no way represents the diversity of the hundreds of millions of Hindus who have no interest in adopting the Hindutva ideology,” urged policymakers to pay attention.

“The presence of this supremacist ideology in Canada is deeply concerning,” the report said.

“It is thus time for Canadians to carefully study and track the growth of a movement that disseminates hate here in Canada.”
 

Ron in Regina

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Some experts cautioned that while Mr Trudeau may seem to be standing alone on the international stage, this row with India may provide a much-needed bump at home….as it sure seems to be working in India to unite Indians with Modi against Trudeau and Canada.
"It got him away from all of these domestic questions," Mr Clark (Campbell Clark, chief political writer for the Globe and Mail newspaper) said.

The problem for Canada, experts told the BBC, is that its interests currently pale in comparison to India's massive strategic importance.
"The United States, the UK, and all these Western and Indo-Pacific allies have built a strategy that largely focuses on India, to be a bulwark and counterweight to China. That's something they can't afford to toss out the window," said Xavier Delgado, a researcher at the Wilson Center's Canada Institute.

"The fact that they haven't come out and rushed to Canada's defence is indicative of the geopolitical reality."

Speaking to Canadian network CTV, US Ambassador to Canada David Cohen confirmed reports that the Five Eyes partners had shared intelligence on the matter. But on a report that those same allies had rebuffed an appeal from Canada to publicly condemn the murder he said only that he was "not in the habit of commenting on private diplomatic conversations".

The only thing that’s been private though so far has been any corroborating evidence to back up the allegations that the Indian government “Might” be involved in a potential political assassination on Canadian soil.
The most deafening silence came from Canada's southern neighbour, the United States. The two countries are close allies, but the US did not speak up with outrage on Canada's behalf.

When President Joe Biden publicly raised India this week, while speaking at the UN, it was not to condemn, but to praise the country for helping to establish a new economic pathway.

Mr Biden's National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan later denied that there was a "wedge" between the US and its neighbour, saying Canada was being closely consulted. But other public statements were tepid, more nods to "deep concern", coupled with affirmations of India's growing importance to the Western world.

"The United States, the UK, and all these Western and Indo-Pacific allies have built a strategy that largely focuses on India, to be a bulwark and counterweight to China. That's something they can't afford to toss out the window," said Xavier Delgado, a researcher at the Wilson Center's Canada Institute.

"The fact that they haven't come out and rushed to Canada's defence is indicative of the geopolitical reality." For Mr Trudeau, that cold geopolitical reality meant an apparently solitary few days while the tensions with India dialled up higher and higher - diplomatic expulsions, travel advisories and, most dramatically, a suspension of all visa services for Canadians seeking to travel to India.

Now, I can’t find anything about Canada having requested extradition of anybody with (or without) a name from India in the Surrey murder, but when I look for that, I find references to Canada ignoring India’s request for extradition of individuals.
 

Dixie Cup

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Wow….I made it just past the 3 minute mark below before I had to wretch a little:
Holy Twat-Waffle Batman!! Who is this Jabroni’s target audience as he’s describing his 10 minutes or less meeting with PM Modi…who also got to fire out his questions and talking points???

Trudeau has made Canada a cautionary tale for the rest of the G-20 among others.
What a liar! He's all for "freedom of expression" & "freedom of protest" and he's not for either! He's simply lying as he does constantly!
 
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Dixie Cup

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Here’s some guesswork from outside:
??????????????
He has "strong reasons" alright! His beliefs leave a little to be desired as he's usually wrong. I'm not saying that he's wrong about India but it wouldn't surprise me. I think, considering Trudeau's track record, I'm skeptical but that's not to say he's wrong in this case but I would like - you know - proof??
 

Dixie Cup

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…But that didn’t happen. Not like this:
View attachment 19296
View attachment 19297…But he (Trudeau) was back to India recently. G20, CBC Coverage. Go!!
Gotta say, at least on India, he’s consistent.
Oh well….maybe our next PM can reverse some of the Liberal/NPD foreign policy to Canada’s benefit for a change of pace…
I'm counting on it!
 

Ron in Regina

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He has "strong reasons" alright! His beliefs leave a little to be desired as he's usually wrong. I'm not saying that he's wrong about India but it wouldn't surprise me. I think, considering Trudeau's track record, I'm skeptical but that's not to say he's wrong in this case but I would like - you know - proof??
Canada has faced calls to release evidence to back up its claims. On Thursday, Trudeau dodged reporters’ questions on the matter, saying his government was “unequivocal around the importance of the rule of law and unequivocal about the importance of protecting Canadians”.
(This was followed Friday morning with the “leak from unknown sources” = the Liberal Party to the CBC… that still didn’t offer any evidence?)

Citing government sources, Canada’s public broadcaster CBC reported on Thursday that the intelligence collected by the Canadian authorities in Nijjar’s case included communications involving Indian officials and Indian diplomats based in Canada.

International law experts told Al Jazeera the information that emerges in the coming days could be key to revealing the nature of the possible links between India and Nijjar’s killing. It could also show whether Canada intends to seek recourse, and if so, how.

In the House of Commons on Monday, Trudeau stressed that any killing on Canadian soil under the auspices of a foreign government would represent a violation of the country’s sovereignty.
Marko Milanovic, a professor of public international law at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom, explained that this violation of sovereignty allegation – if ‘proven’ true – would constitute a breach of what is known as “customary international law”.

According to Cornell Law School, that term refers to “international obligations arising from established international practice”, rather than from treaties.

“Essentially, one state is not allowed to send its agents onto the territory of another state without that government’s permission,” Milanovic told Al Jazeera. “Whatever they might do – they can’t go and do gardening, but they also can’t go and commit murder.”

Ghahremani added that “if” India was involved, the killing would violate the UN Charter, which states that “all members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state”.

Canada has not definitively linked India to the killing or released any evidence to back up its decision to go public with the investigation into the suspected connection.

Depending on how far Trudeau and his government are planning to push the issue – and “if” more definitive evidence emerges – they could eventually pursue a case in the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the UN’s main judicial organ, said Milanovic.

Information that emerges in the coming days – through both official and unofficial channels – will likely begin to indicate the path Canada plans to take, he said.

“If we get little to no further information about this, it will be reasonably clear that the Canadian government will just want to wait this out and to have the whole thing die a natural death,” he said. (But will it?)

But if more facts emerge, “that will be an indicator that the Canadian government really wants to press this further.”
It’s really really time to step up with something beyond allegations for Canada & Trudeau…as this accusation without any proof or corroborating evidence is not good.
 

Ron in Regina

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Ottawa stands to lose from its spat with New Delhi over the killing of a Sikh separatist in terms of trade and its ability to be part of the network of Indo-Pacific institutions while India's image as a democratic country committed to rules-based order could take a hit, according to an expert.

A diplomatic row erupted between India and Canada earlier this week following Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's allegations of "potential" involvement of Indian agents in the killing of Khalistani extremist Hardeep Singh Nijjar, a Canadian citizen, in British Columbia on June 18.

In a blog posted by the Wilson Institute on Friday, Canada Institute Associate Xavier Delgado said, "Trade will likely be the first major casualty of the fallout, with negotiations for the EPTA (Early Progress Trade Agreement) being put on hold. Both countries declared that they would pause trade talks with each other earlier this month and Canadian Trade Minister Mary Ng has indefinitely postponed a trade mission to New Delhi that had been planned for October," he wrote.

"The allegations can damage India's public image as a democratic nation committed to a rules-based order or, more critically, its perception as a trustworthy ally in the competition against China."

In May 2023 the exports of Canada to India were mainly from Saskatchewan (C$211M), British Columbia (C$138M), Quebec (C$56.6M), Ontario (C$42.2M), and Alberta(C$18.8M), while imports from India destinations were mainly Ontario(C$403M), Quebec (C$144M), British Columbia (C$84.9M), Alberta (C$40M), and Saskatchewan (C$12.3M).
1695581482397.jpeg
1695581498895.jpeg
Last year, India was Canada’s 10th largest trading partner, Global Affairs Canada said on its website, adding that India will be a “key partner as Canada strengthens its economic links to the Indo-Pacific under a new, comprehensive strategy for the region.”

Saskatchewan makes up roughly a third of Canada’s exports to India, which are worth over $1 billion to the provincial economy. The trade includes commodities like lentils, which India has occasionally blocked or delayed as it tinkers with pest-control policies. Saskatchewan also has a trade and investment office in New Delhi.
1695582368554.jpeg
 
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petros

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Ottawa stands to lose from its spat with New Delhi over the killing of a Sikh separatist in terms of trade and its ability to be part of the network of Indo-Pacific institutions while India's image as a democratic country committed to rules-based order could take a hit, according to an expert.

A diplomatic row erupted between India and Canada earlier this week following Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's allegations of "potential" involvement of Indian agents in the killing of Khalistani extremist Hardeep Singh Nijjar, a Canadian citizen, in British Columbia on June 18.

In a blog posted by the Wilson Institute on Friday, Canada Institute Associate Xavier Delgado said, "Trade will likely be the first major casualty of the fallout, with negotiations for the EPTA (Early Progress Trade Agreement) being put on hold. Both countries declared that they would pause trade talks with each other earlier this month and Canadian Trade Minister Mary Ng has indefinitely postponed a trade mission to New Delhi that had been planned for October," he wrote.

"The allegations can damage India's public image as a democratic nation committed to a rules-based order or, more critically, its perception as a trustworthy ally in the competition against China."

In May 2023 the exports of Canada to India were mainly from Saskatchewan (C$211M), British Columbia (C$138M), Quebec (C$56.6M), Ontario (C$42.2M), and Alberta(C$18.8M), while imports from India destinations were mainly Ontario(C$403M), Quebec (C$144M), British Columbia (C$84.9M), Alberta (C$40M), and Saskatchewan (C$12.3M).
View attachment 19410
View attachment 19411
Last year, India was Canada’s 10th largest trading partner, Global Affairs Canada said on its website, adding that India will be a “key partner as Canada strengthens its economic links to the Indo-Pacific under a new, comprehensive strategy for the region.”

Saskatchewan makes up roughly a third of Canada’s exports to India, which are worth over $1 billion to the provincial economy. The trade includes commodities like lentils, which India has occasionally blocked or delayed as it tinkers with pest-control policies. Saskatchewan also has a trade and investment office in New Delhi.
View attachment 19412
I don't want to lose pulse contracts. Nope.
 

Taxslave2

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Canada has faced calls to release evidence to back up its claims. On Thursday, Trudeau dodged reporters’ questions on the matter, saying his government was “unequivocal around the importance of the rule of law and unequivocal about the importance of protecting Canadians”.

Except when it is Canadians protesting his oppressive laws. Then freezing bank accounts of single mothers that donate $25 to a legal and democratic protest is the right thing to do.
 

Ron in Regina

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Canada has faced calls to release evidence to back up its claims. On Thursday, Trudeau dodged reporters’ questions on the matter, saying his government was “unequivocal around the importance of the rule of law and unequivocal about the importance of protecting Canadians”.
Except when it is Canadians protesting his oppressive laws. Then freezing bank accounts of single mothers that donate $25 to a legal and democratic protest is the right thing to do.
I don't want to lose pulse contracts. Nope.
I don’t want to see that either, or potash exports, etc…so let’s get this evidence out there and not just be clowns by association making unfounded/credible allegations…& then go forward instead of this swirl around the Trudeau bowl that we’ve been in for the last week.

The time for pussyfooting has passed as soon as Trudeau publicly made the first allegation, and so did the excuse of not saying anything due to an active investigation. If you’re not going to shut up, you gotta be willing to put up, and so far Canada via Trudeau is flapping its gums but not supporting it with anything of any substance whatsoever.

After a week of fallout from the prime minister's accusation that India was involved in the murder of a prominent a pro-Khalistan activist, Defence Minister Bill Blair sought to shift focus away from questions of intelligence on Sunday and toward the ongoing criminal investigation into the issue.

"It's another reason why I place such emphasis on the investigation that's taking place, that we'd be able to move beyond credible intelligence to evidence, strong evidence of exactly what happened, so that we and the Indian government can know the truth, have the facts and then work together to resolve it in an appropriate way," he told CBC chief political correspondent Rosemary Barton.

Maybe starting with some evidence, strong evidence, would have been the starting point before unsubstantiated allegations though.

"I'm not going to say anything that would in any way compromise the integrity of that investigation, it's just too important." Wish the PM was on that same page…
 

Dixie Cup

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Canada has faced calls to release evidence to back up its claims. On Thursday, Trudeau dodged reporters’ questions on the matter, saying his government was “unequivocal around the importance of the rule of law and unequivocal about the importance of protecting Canadians”.
(This was followed Friday morning with the “leak from unknown sources” = the Liberal Party to the CBC… that still didn’t offer any evidence?)

Citing government sources, Canada’s public broadcaster CBC reported on Thursday that the intelligence collected by the Canadian authorities in Nijjar’s case included communications involving Indian officials and Indian diplomats based in Canada.

International law experts told Al Jazeera the information that emerges in the coming days could be key to revealing the nature of the possible links between India and Nijjar’s killing. It could also show whether Canada intends to seek recourse, and if so, how.

In the House of Commons on Monday, Trudeau stressed that any killing on Canadian soil under the auspices of a foreign government would represent a violation of the country’s sovereignty.
Marko Milanovic, a professor of public international law at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom, explained that this violation of sovereignty allegation – if ‘proven’ true – would constitute a breach of what is known as “customary international law”.

According to Cornell Law School, that term refers to “international obligations arising from established international practice”, rather than from treaties.

“Essentially, one state is not allowed to send its agents onto the territory of another state without that government’s permission,” Milanovic told Al Jazeera. “Whatever they might do – they can’t go and do gardening, but they also can’t go and commit murder.”

Ghahremani added that “if” India was involved, the killing would violate the UN Charter, which states that “all members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state”.

Canada has not definitively linked India to the killing or released any evidence to back up its decision to go public with the investigation into the suspected connection.

Depending on how far Trudeau and his government are planning to push the issue – and “if” more definitive evidence emerges – they could eventually pursue a case in the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the UN’s main judicial organ, said Milanovic.

Information that emerges in the coming days – through both official and unofficial channels – will likely begin to indicate the path Canada plans to take, he said.

“If we get little to no further information about this, it will be reasonably clear that the Canadian government will just want to wait this out and to have the whole thing die a natural death,” he said. (But will it?)

But if more facts emerge, “that will be an indicator that the Canadian government really wants to press this further.”
It’s really really time to step up with something beyond allegations for Canada & Trudeau…as this accusation without any proof or corroborating evidence is not good.
I'm a bit disturbed by the fact that no evidence has been provided as yet. Trudeau's ego tho' may prove to be his downfall because he's made these claims. Will be interesting to see what proof, if any, he actually has.
 

Ron in Regina

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I'm a bit disturbed by the fact that no evidence has been provided as yet. Trudeau's ego tho' may prove to be his downfall because he's made these claims. Will be interesting to see what proof, if any, he actually has.
Everyone is waiting to see what evidence he has. What has surprised critics is that Trudeau made the allegations public before the police investigation was completed. That has angered the Indian government, which is demanding that Ottawa show the evidence.

Impatience on Trudeau to fill the information vacuum is growing: “The Prime Minister needs to lay out his case, immediately, to bolster support for the government’s actions both at home and abroad,” the Toronto Globe and Mail said in an editorial. “Canadians deserve clarity on such an important matter, particularly given the potential for significant diplomatic and economic repercussions.”

(The longer Trudeau drags this out, the longer nobody notices that there’s a slew of other issues like inflation & housing & Chinese Election Interference that aren’t related to the unsupported allegations made against India)

For Trudeau and Joly — his former Quebec lieutenant who came to the post with no foreign affairs experience — the crisis comes shortly after the government unveiled a long-awaited and much vaunted Indo-Pacific strategy meant to make relations with India and the region a cornerstone of Canadian foreign policy.

For Trudeau, who has survived three ethics violations and will go down in history as the first Canadian prime minister to be found guilty of breaking federal ethics laws, the crisis occurs in the background of plummeting ratings, brought about by a stubborn cost of living and housing crisis.

Facing an election between now and 2025, Trudeau needs to keep domestic political considerations in mind going forward. Canadians of Indian origin represent a significant voting bloc, almost four percent of the population or 1.3 million; more than half of them Sikhs, including minority opposition leader Jagmeet Singh whose New Democratic Party keeps Trudeau’s ruling Liberals in power.
 

55Mercury

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But shit, no, we don't even have the guts (officially) to tell them on entering to please check their racism, along with their 3rd-world gripes, at the border (or gtfo) but the drama queen doesn't care about immigrants and nor did any of his predecessors.
^from Indigenous Issues post #3592

so what we have today is a result of failing to insist the 3rd world not bring their 3rd world problems with them.

enjoy, suckers