RIP to Prince Philip

Danbones

Hall of Fame Member
Sep 23, 2015
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Based on science, I say wrong is their constant state.
;)
Unless one is a befuddled communist.

Haha, leftists can never be right...conservatives only when they aren't in power.
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
74,851
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Vernon, B.C.
Based on science, I say wrong is their constant state.
;)
Unless one is a befuddled communist.

Haha, leftists can never be right...conservatives only when they aren't in power.
Maybe, but of all the news sources I find them to be one of the most reliable!
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
45,691
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Harry and Meghan can’t hold a candle to Prince Philip

He showed the self-obsessed duo what a life of public service really looks like.

Harry and Meghan can’t hold a candle to Prince Philip


JULIE BURCHILL

12th April 2021
Spiked

I’ve never been much of a monarchist. I’m so old that I remember the days when they used to play the national anthem in cinemas after the credits, and one of my earliest memories is of my mother attempting to prise me out of my seat to stand respectfully. (Appropriately, the film was Born Free.) As a counter-jumping sink-school meritocrat, I’m suspicious of any position of privilege conferred on anyone who didn’t earn it. Nevertheless, over the past few years I’ve started to feel the first belated stirrings of monarchism.

Just as I could never vote Tory until it became clear that this was the only way to get Brexit done, so I could never stand up for the queen’s theme song until Harry and Meghan rocked up with their passion project – ‘The Grabdication’ as I coined it – to make it all about them. It’s a cliché that we all move to the right as we get older, usually dismissed as a result of getting more cautious and affluent. But in my case, with both examples, it comes from becoming more wised-up to the patronising liberal lectures of the self-styled Great and the Good.

It’s no mistake that the Oprah interview with (or rather audience with) Harry and Meghan divided viewers not along race or class lines, but by generations. It’s natural when you’re young to believe that you’re a uniquely free spirit and that the big bad world isn’t worthy of you; most of us merely sulk in our bedrooms for our 16th summer, read a bit of Baudelaire as the leaves fall, and bounce back in time to have a good old frolic at the sixth-form Christmas disco, having been chivvied out of our hangdog ways by our merrier mates. But it’s true that misery loves company, and if we do have the bad luck to meet a similarly surly bedroom-lurker whose neuroses click with ours, we can stay at this stage of arrested development indefinitely. We may even come to believe that authority figures are planning our ruin and strike back with unwarranted violence – remember Heavenly Creatures.

In Harry and Meghan’s actual youth, they appear to have managed to divert themselves with work, play and light-hearted romantic unions. But then in their thirties they met their dark-night-of-the-soulmate – and all bets were off. Whatever feelings of resentment they had experienced as children with the bad-tempered break-ups of their respective families clicked together like a sort of sulky Lego, and before long it was the-wonder-of-us against the world. What we’re now witnessing from the Sussexes is the most public and well-financed door-slamming exercise of all time.

Meghan’s Hyacinth Bucket-like fussing about poor little Archie not being allowed to be a prince is a stark contrast to the instructions left by the duke that he wanted no fuss and no state funeral. It took the doublespeak of the Grabdication, where ‘finding freedom’ from public scrutiny means sneaking off to the entertainment capital of the world (via Commonwealth Canada – crafty!), and inking a multimillion-dollar deal with Netflix to show up the sterling qualities of the man which lay behind the momentary self-pitying outbursts – ‘I’m just a bloody amoeba!’ – and the grating quasi-racist greetings. Born in exile on a kitchen table and a refugee at the age of 18 months, there were no open arms of Oprah waiting to welcome him to a strange land; manipulated by his wily uncle Mountbatten into a dynastic marriage he gave up his career, his religion and his name in order to devote his life to walking two steps behind his wife. Somehow, they made it work beautifully.

Part of the reason we feel respect for the queen, no matter what our political beliefs, is that she never wanted the position which a trick of fate landed her with – but having accepted the role, proceeded to fulfil it much more admirably than any monarch raised with the job in mind. We can easily believe the stories of how much she is said to have enjoyed her brief civilian life as a navy wife in Malta, looking after her two young children and her dashing husband, until the sceptre of Damocles which hung over her head dropped irretrievably into her hand.

We can only imagine how much sorrow she must now feel. But it will remain purely in our imaginations, because the queen will never complain, knowing as she does that if the under-examined life is not worth living, equally the over-examined life becomes half a life, once the world has finished picking the bones of it on primetime TV.

Julie Burchill’s Welcome To The Woke Trials: How We Can Shape Progressive Future Politics will be published this year.

 
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spaminator

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Prince Philip called Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's Oprah interview 'madness'
Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Publishing date:Apr 12, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • 27 Comments
In this file photo taken on Dec. 25, 2017, Britain's Prince Philip, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry arrive to attend the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk.
In this file photo taken on Dec. 25, 2017, Britain's Prince Philip, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry arrive to attend the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk. PHOTO BY ADRIAN DENNIS /Getty Images
Article content
Prince Philip was silent in the days following his grandson Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey. But in the wake of the Duke of Edinburgh’s death last week at the age of 99, his biographer Gyles Brandreth has revealed his friend thought the tell-all chat was “madness.”

Meghan and Harry set off a bomb in royal circles when they claimed someone in the Royal Family had expressed concerns about the colour of their son Archie’s skin after he was born.


“That was relayed to me from Harry, those were conversations that family had with him,” Meghan recounted in an interview with Winfrey last month.

Elsewhere in the two-hour broadcast, Meghan claimed that life as royal was awful and that when she asked the family for help her pleas were ignored. “I just didn’t want to be alive anymore,” she told Winfrey.

“I know from someone close to him that he thought Meghan and Harry’s interview with Oprah Winfrey was ‘madness’ and ‘no good would come of it,'” Brandreth told the Daily Mail. “I was not surprised because that is exactly how he described to me the personal TV interviews given by Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales, back in the 1990s.”

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Meghan and Harry were widely criticized for participating in the interview while Philip was in hospital during a month-long stay, but Brandreth said the fact they sat down with Winfrey didn’t trouble him.

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are interviewed by Oprah Winfrey in this undated handout photo.
Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are interviewed by Oprah Winfrey in this undated handout photo. PHOTO BY HARPO PRODUCTIONS/JOE PUGLIESE /Handout via REUTERS
“What did worry him was the couple’s preoccupation with their own problems and their willingness to talk about them in public. ‘Give TV interviews by all means,’ he said, ‘but don’t talk about yourself,'” Brandreth said.

“That was one of his rules. I know he shared it with his children. I imagine he shared it with his grandchildren, too.”

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Megyn Kelly trashes Meghan Markle: 'We're supposed to feel sorry for you?'
People stroll on the Long Walk outside Windsor Castle after Britain's Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth, died at the age of 99, in Windsor, near London, Britain, April 11, 2021.
Prince Philip spent final hours in comfort, with Queen: Report

Following Harry and Meghan’s allegations of royal bigotry, many viewers watching took to social media to paint Philip, who himself had been accused in the past of displaying casual racism, as the culprit.

“I don’t know who it was,” TV personality Megyn Kelly said the following day in an interview on Good Morning Britain. “But while the guy’s in hospital, you might want to put a corral around him and say, ‘I can tell you it’s not the suffering 99-year-old.’ Something to throw the guy a bone.”

After the broadcast, Winfrey confirmed to Deadline that the comment about Archie’s skin tone didn’t come from Queen Elizabeth II or Prince Philip.

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Elsewhere in his interview with the Daily Mail, Brandreth said Philip wasn’t pleased his grandson and his wife moved to America last year.

“Harry had only succeeded his grandfather as Captain General of the Royal Marines in 2017. Philip had done the job for 64 years. Harry had barely managed 30 months. The Duke of Edinburgh was not pleased, nor did he believe that Harry and Meghan were doing the right thing.”

But, Brandreth added, Philip said, “People have got to lead their lives as they think best.”

After arriving back in the U.K. on Sunday without his wife and son, Harry praised Philip on Monday for his devotion to “granny” Queen Elizabeth.

“He was authentically himself, with a seriously sharp wit, and could hold the attention of any room due to his charm and also because you never knew what he might say next,” said Harry.

Philip’s funeral is set to take place this Saturday.

mdaniell@postmedia.com
 
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Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Prince Philip called Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's Oprah interview 'madness'
Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Publishing date:Apr 12, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • 27 Comments
In this file photo taken on Dec. 25, 2017, Britain's Prince Philip, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry arrive to attend the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk.
In this file photo taken on Dec. 25, 2017, Britain's Prince Philip, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry arrive to attend the Royal Family's traditional Christmas Day church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk. PHOTO BY ADRIAN DENNIS /Getty Images
Article content
Prince Philip was silent in the days following his grandson Harry and Meghan Markle’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey. But in the wake of the Duke of Edinburgh’s death last week at the age of 99, his biographer Gyles Brandreth has revealed his friend thought the tell-all chat was “madness.”

Meghan and Harry set off a bomb in royal circles when they claimed someone in the Royal Family had expressed concerns about the colour of their son Archie’s skin after he was born.


“That was relayed to me from Harry, those were conversations that family had with him,” Meghan recounted in an interview with Winfrey last month.

Elsewhere in the two-hour broadcast, Meghan claimed that life as royal was awful and that when she asked the family for help her pleas were ignored. “I just didn’t want to be alive anymore,” she told Winfrey.

“I know from someone close to him that he thought Meghan and Harry’s interview with Oprah Winfrey was ‘madness’ and ‘no good would come of it,'” Brandreth told the Daily Mail. “I was not surprised because that is exactly how he described to me the personal TV interviews given by Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales, back in the 1990s.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

Meghan and Harry were widely criticized for participating in the interview while Philip was in hospital during a month-long stay, but Brandreth said the fact they sat down with Winfrey didn’t trouble him.

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are interviewed by Oprah Winfrey in this undated handout photo.
Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are interviewed by Oprah Winfrey in this undated handout photo. PHOTO BY HARPO PRODUCTIONS/JOE PUGLIESE /Handout via REUTERS
“What did worry him was the couple’s preoccupation with their own problems and their willingness to talk about them in public. ‘Give TV interviews by all means,’ he said, ‘but don’t talk about yourself,'” Brandreth said.

“That was one of his rules. I know he shared it with his children. I imagine he shared it with his grandchildren, too.”

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are interviewed by Oprah Winfrey in this undated handout photo.
Meghan accuses royals of racism, says they pushed her to brink of suicide
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, and Piers Morgan are pictured in this combination photo.
Piers Morgan renews Meghan Markle attack, rages against 'woke brigade'
Megyn Kelly
Megyn Kelly trashes Meghan Markle: 'We're supposed to feel sorry for you?'
People stroll on the Long Walk outside Windsor Castle after Britain's Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth, died at the age of 99, in Windsor, near London, Britain, April 11, 2021.
Prince Philip spent final hours in comfort, with Queen: Report

Following Harry and Meghan’s allegations of royal bigotry, many viewers watching took to social media to paint Philip, who himself had been accused in the past of displaying casual racism, as the culprit.

“I don’t know who it was,” TV personality Megyn Kelly said the following day in an interview on Good Morning Britain. “But while the guy’s in hospital, you might want to put a corral around him and say, ‘I can tell you it’s not the suffering 99-year-old.’ Something to throw the guy a bone.”

After the broadcast, Winfrey confirmed to Deadline that the comment about Archie’s skin tone didn’t come from Queen Elizabeth II or Prince Philip.

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Article content
Elsewhere in his interview with the Daily Mail, Brandreth said Philip wasn’t pleased his grandson and his wife moved to America last year.

“Harry had only succeeded his grandfather as Captain General of the Royal Marines in 2017. Philip had done the job for 64 years. Harry had barely managed 30 months. The Duke of Edinburgh was not pleased, nor did he believe that Harry and Meghan were doing the right thing.”

But, Brandreth added, Philip said, “People have got to lead their lives as they think best.”

After arriving back in the U.K. on Sunday without his wife and son, Harry praised Philip on Monday for his devotion to “granny” Queen Elizabeth.

“He was authentically himself, with a seriously sharp wit, and could hold the attention of any room due to his charm and also because you never knew what he might say next,” said Harry.

Philip’s funeral is set to take place this Saturday.

mdaniell@postmedia.com

I bet he said quite a lot about it, no doubt involving quite a few F-words.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
45,691
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IMO, Harry earned those titles, they aren't just honorary. He went into combat, he did the job... he deserves the titles/medals/uniform.

He's been stripped of his honorary titles, which he had.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
45,691
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A tribe on the island of Tanna in the Pacific mourn the loss of their god Prince Philip. His roll will likely be taken over by Prince Charles

 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Prince Philip coverage nets BBC most complaints in its history
Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Jennifer Hassan, The Washington Post
Publishing date:Apr 13, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • 10 Comments
A picture of Britain's Prince Philip rests on a memorial at Sheffield cathedral, in Sheffield, Britain, April 13, 2021.
A picture of Britain's Prince Philip rests on a memorial at Sheffield cathedral, in Sheffield, Britain, April 13, 2021. PHOTO BY ANDREW BOYERS /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON – The BBC received a record-breaking number of complaints following its extensive coverage of Prince Philip’s death, with more than 110,000 people contacting the broadcaster to grumble over changes to scheduled programming and “excessive” reporting on his life and legacy.

According to British media, the outpouring of criticism makes his death the most-complained-about event in the country’s television history, with the wave of backlash forcing the BBC to temporarily build a dedicated complaints page where people could object to the programming.


Philip, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, husband to reigning British monarch Queen Elizabeth II “passed away peacefully” on Friday at Windsor Castle – where he had been staying amid the coronavirus pandemic. Following the news of his death, the BBC revised its schedule to make way for tributes, pulling popular television shows such as “Gardeners’ World” and postponing the “MasterChef” final.

The BBC defended its coverage, saying it was “proud of the role we play during moments of national significance,” but it did not disclose the precise number of complaints received. Official figures are expected to be published this week on the broadcaster’s biweekly complaint log.

While the broadcaster has since removed the dedicated complaints page, which read: “We’re receiving complaints about too much TV coverage of the death of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh,” it did not go unnoticed.

“The BBC, having adopted wall-to-wall Prince Philip coverage to avoid being criticized in parts of the media and politics…. has now received so many complaints about their wall-to-wall coverage they’ve set up a streamlined form to complain about it,” tweeted Guardian Media Editor Jim Waterson.

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While much of the nation – and the world – paid tribute to the duke and mourned his death, the BBC’s decision to dedicate so much airtime to royal programming angered “MasterChef” fans, who had been looking forward to seeing who would be crowned winner of the popular cooking competition.

Many on social media pointed out that the same coverage of the duke was running on two BBC channels simultaneously, noting that one channel dedicated to coverage would have been a better idea.

According to the Guardian, the record-holder for highest total of complaints until now came in 2005, when the BBC televised controversial musical “Jerry Springer: The Opera” – much to the displeasure of Christian groups who said they were offended by scenes that depicted dancers dressed as Ku Klux Klan members and a confrontation between Satan and a diaper-wearing Jesus.

A total of 63,000 complaints were logged about the opera, with the Daily Mail claiming at the time that the show contained 8,000 swear words.

The broadcaster is not the only company to face criticism following the duke’s death. As Britain’s Network Rail and National Rail websites went “dark” to commemorate the 99-year-old, visually impaired customers complained they were no longer able to book travel tickets or view train timetables due to the newly implemented grayscale design.


“As someone who is registered severely sight impaired, good colour contrast on a website is incredibly important,” explained Robin Spinks of the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Both services issued statements following the backlash, saying the tributes had been “temporary” and that they were listening to customer feedback to improve accessibility so that content is more inclusive.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
45,691
1,224
113
Prince Philip coverage nets BBC most complaints in its history
Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Jennifer Hassan, The Washington Post
Publishing date:Apr 13, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • 10 Comments
A picture of Britain's Prince Philip rests on a memorial at Sheffield cathedral, in Sheffield, Britain, April 13, 2021.
A picture of Britain's Prince Philip rests on a memorial at Sheffield cathedral, in Sheffield, Britain, April 13, 2021. PHOTO BY ANDREW BOYERS /REUTERS
Article content
LONDON – The BBC received a record-breaking number of complaints following its extensive coverage of Prince Philip’s death, with more than 110,000 people contacting the broadcaster to grumble over changes to scheduled programming and “excessive” reporting on his life and legacy.

According to British media, the outpouring of criticism makes his death the most-complained-about event in the country’s television history, with the wave of backlash forcing the BBC to temporarily build a dedicated complaints page where people could object to the programming.


Philip, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, husband to reigning British monarch Queen Elizabeth II “passed away peacefully” on Friday at Windsor Castle – where he had been staying amid the coronavirus pandemic. Following the news of his death, the BBC revised its schedule to make way for tributes, pulling popular television shows such as “Gardeners’ World” and postponing the “MasterChef” final.

The BBC defended its coverage, saying it was “proud of the role we play during moments of national significance,” but it did not disclose the precise number of complaints received. Official figures are expected to be published this week on the broadcaster’s biweekly complaint log.

While the broadcaster has since removed the dedicated complaints page, which read: “We’re receiving complaints about too much TV coverage of the death of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh,” it did not go unnoticed.

“The BBC, having adopted wall-to-wall Prince Philip coverage to avoid being criticized in parts of the media and politics…. has now received so many complaints about their wall-to-wall coverage they’ve set up a streamlined form to complain about it,” tweeted Guardian Media Editor Jim Waterson.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

While much of the nation – and the world – paid tribute to the duke and mourned his death, the BBC’s decision to dedicate so much airtime to royal programming angered “MasterChef” fans, who had been looking forward to seeing who would be crowned winner of the popular cooking competition.

Many on social media pointed out that the same coverage of the duke was running on two BBC channels simultaneously, noting that one channel dedicated to coverage would have been a better idea.

According to the Guardian, the record-holder for highest total of complaints until now came in 2005, when the BBC televised controversial musical “Jerry Springer: The Opera” – much to the displeasure of Christian groups who said they were offended by scenes that depicted dancers dressed as Ku Klux Klan members and a confrontation between Satan and a diaper-wearing Jesus.

A total of 63,000 complaints were logged about the opera, with the Daily Mail claiming at the time that the show contained 8,000 swear words.

The broadcaster is not the only company to face criticism following the duke’s death. As Britain’s Network Rail and National Rail websites went “dark” to commemorate the 99-year-old, visually impaired customers complained they were no longer able to book travel tickets or view train timetables due to the newly implemented grayscale design.


“As someone who is registered severely sight impaired, good colour contrast on a website is incredibly important,” explained Robin Spinks of the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Both services issued statements following the backlash, saying the tributes had been “temporary” and that they were listening to customer feedback to improve accessibility so that content is more inclusive.

It's because they put it on every BBC channel when one should suffice. They played the same programmes on all their channels.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
45,691
1,224
113
Prince Charles is Duke of Edinburgh.

When he becomes King, Prince Edward will be Duke of Edinburgh.