RCMP wants warrantless access to Internet data of Canadians

AnnaG

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Jul 5, 2009
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RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson recently called for the urgent need to have warrantless access to Internet subscriber information in order to keep Canadians safe. This type of intelligence gathering would violate the 2014 unanimous Supreme Court ruling in R. v Spencer, which ensures that authorities must receive a warrant before Internet Service Providers provide subscriber data.
RCMP looking for warrantless access to Canadians’ Internet data - CJFE | Canadian Journalists for Free Expression

Perhaps we need someone to keep us and our privacy safe from RCMP commissioners.

hehehe https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/

https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en and there is another browser coming out called "Hornet".
 

B00Mer

This is the way
Sep 6, 2008
40,019
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Previously posted


http://forums.canadiancontent.net/news/139426-rcmp-boss-wants-warrantless-access.html
 

VanIsle

Always thinking
Nov 12, 2008
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Of course they do. Knowledge is power.Also looking to justify their existence.
Taxslave, why do you hate the RCMP ?


I thought I talked about this on this thread. I don't understand why any of you would feel concerned about this. They are not interested in your trivial conversations. Anyone overly concerned has something to hide. I'm sure they will be set up for kiddie porn. More than anything they will be set up for recording key words that MIGHT make them suspect terrorist type activity. They do not have the time, money or man power for checking things we have to chat about. Obviously they have people in mind already.
 

JLM

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Nov 27, 2008
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Taxslave, why do you hate the RCMP ?



I thought I talked about this on this thread. I don't understand why any of you would feel concerned about this. They are not interested in your trivial conversations. Anyone overly concerned has something to hide. I'm sure they will be set up for kiddie porn. More than anything they will be set up for recording key words that MIGHT make them suspect terrorist type activity. They do not have the time, money or man power for checking things we have to chat about. Obviously they have people in mind already.

You'd be right probably 90% of the time, but we all know there are rogue cops, possibly as many as 10% of the force. And it's not rare for rogue cops to harass people for little or no reason, it happens all the time. It can get started as simple as a guy giving the cop the finger and the cops decides he's going to "get him for something".
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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There is no need to freak out man, your pager dope will remain safe.

Anything without a warrant can't be used in court and having to go through a Fed judge and then CRTC isn't cheap or quick. Besides, this is nothing new, keywords in communications have been scanned for decades and have saved a lot of lives and stopped a lot of contraband.
 

AnnaG

Hall of Fame Member
Jul 5, 2009
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My apologies. Well, perhaps a mod could wed the two threads?
And Bloomer. Who are you to sneer for this. You do the same thing on a regular basis. So, to your little mooning smilie, I reply with
 
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tay

Hall of Fame Member
May 20, 2012
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Taxslave, why do you hate the RCMP ?



I thought I talked about this on this thread. I don't understand why any of you would feel concerned about this. They are not interested in your trivial conversations. Anyone overly concerned has something to hide. I'm sure they will be set up for kiddie porn. More than anything they will be set up for recording key words that MIGHT make them suspect terrorist type activity. They do not have the time, money or man power for checking things we have to chat about. Obviously they have people in mind already.


And I thought I answered your last statement about this but it has disappeared.

Let's say you have a government in power that greatly dislikes a certain group such as 'Environmentalists' who are fighting against pollution by challenging big polluters.

If that government was so inclined, with easy access from their friends in the Police or other law enforcement authorities, wanted to frame those leaders of the opposing groups, they could easily access their 'electronic' discussions and e mail accounts etcetera to indeed put anything they so desired into those accounts which may turn out to damaging to the persons credibility.

Yes they could even put links to child porn sites etcetera to make it appear that the critics are heinous individuals beyond comprehension.

With a requirement of a 'warrant' those same authorities have to go to the internet provider and request a transcript of your account(s) which would go to the Judge upon which he/she will determine as to whether it is indeed warranted based on the information in your transcript(s).

In short it ensures there is nothing added to your accounts that maybe fictional, yet very damaging which is why Canadians freaked out over these proposed when the Harper Cons first proposed it.........

RCMP have been holding back millions of dollars from the force's vaunted program to fight online child pornography, partly to help the Harper government pay down the federal deficit.

CBC News has learned that over a five-year period, Canada's national police force Mounties withheld some $10 million in funds earmarked for its National Child Exploitation Co-ordination Centre and related projects, linchpins of the government's anti-child-pornography agenda.


Child-porn policing program suffers from RCMP underspending - Politics - CBC News

Back in 2012, Canadians nuked the then public safety minister’s Bill C-30. The bill, deceptively christened Preventing Children from Internet Predators Act, had sought to give law enforcement agencies unlimited power to spy on Canadians.


A new cybercrime bill currently being rammed through parliament by Justice Minister Peter MacKay, is the reincarnation of Bill C-30.


Bill C-13, also deceptively named “Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act”, has nothing to do with curbing cyberbullying. Instead, it gives government law enforcement authorities, particularly secretive agencies such as the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) and CSIS, overreaching surveillance powers.

The bill will also rewards telecom companies that provide these authorities with direct access to Canadians’ private and sensitive information they hold in their databases. That’s access to a Canadian’s name, address, telephone number, emails, text messages – the whole nine yards.

That’s in addition to the spying the government is already conducting via telecom companies. According to the Federal Privacy Commission, the government has requested Canadians’ personal data from telecom companies an average 1.2 million times per year since 2011.

Ontario privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian, the opposition and right activist are particularly worried about Bill C-13.
In a recent letter to the House of Commons’ Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, Cavoukian accused the Conservatives of “dressing up overreaching surveillance powers in the sheep-like clothing of sanctimony about the serious harms caused by child pornography and cyberbullying”.

“Canadians have a constitutional right to be secure from unreasonable search and seizure, including with respect to personal information held by third parties,” Cavoukian wrote.

In a statement, the NDP’s Charlie Angus had this to say: “Continual revelations about warrantless snooping and new bills that Conservatives are trying to sneak through Parliament prove that Conservatives just don’t have a balanced approach when it comes to privacy. We’re all for catching terrorists, we’re all for going after bullies but we can do it in a balanced way that also respects privacy and doesn’t open the door to abuse.”

Over 50 major rights organizations are mobilizing Canadians’ pushback against the dictatorship-style Bill C-13 through OpenMedia.ca. Please play your part and defend your privacy.
 

AnnaG

Hall of Fame Member
Jul 5, 2009
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Anyways, my point is that warrant or not, there is way more stuff wandering around in the deepweb than ever was at the surface. And what is wandering around in the deepweb is anonymous. IPs there are meaningless.
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
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Taxslave, why do you hate the RCMP ?



I thought I talked about this on this thread. I don't understand why any of you would feel concerned about this. They are not interested in your trivial conversations. Anyone overly concerned has something to hide. I'm sure they will be set up for kiddie porn. More than anything they will be set up for recording key words that MIGHT make them suspect terrorist type activity. They do not have the time, money or man power for checking things we have to chat about. Obviously they have people in mind already.

Because they are little more than a criminal organization. They regularly break the laws they are sworn to uphold. Want more?
 

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
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Because they are little more than a criminal organization. They regularly break the laws they are sworn to uphold. Want more?

Taken a look at the CIA, FBI, Homeland Security people lately? The Mounties look like Boy Scouts beside that lot.
 

damngrumpy

Executive Branch Member
Mar 16, 2005
9,949
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kelowna bc
I for one do not agree with the RCMP being given access to accounts like this
without a warrant. This is tiptoe to police state and we have seen how that
works around the world. Mind you they will find mine boring as hell but I still
don't want cops or anyone else being given that type of power. Remember we
have an agreement with the United States of America and any and all information
would be shared. I don't trust America any more than I do Putin and his cronies.

Remember the saying If you give up liberty for security you end up with neither