Ontario Storms : May 21st

Wise

Electoral Member
Mar 3, 2019
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WION Channel on Youtube shows that at least 4 people really died and 900,000 homes are without power after heavy storms hit the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The dangerous storm lasted more than two hours and left a trail of destruction; uprooting many trees, disrupting various traffic and damaging valuable homes.
 

B00Mer

Keep Calm and Carry On
Sep 6, 2008
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Rent Free in Your Head
www.getafteritmedia.com

WION Channel on Youtube shows that at least 4 people really died and 900,000 homes are without power after heavy storms hit the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The dangerous storm lasted more than two hours and left a trail of destruction; uprooting many trees, disrupting various traffic and damaging valuable homes.

9 people dead.. thanks for making a new thread and old news.. brilliant. Take the short bus
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Manotick man powers neighbourhood with 'microgrid' house post-storm
When Saturday's storm cut off his neighbours' power supply and disrupted access to their well and septic systems, Art Hunter stepped in to help.

Author of the article:Marco Vigliotti
Publishing date:May 24, 2022 • 20 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
The big white boxes on the left are three Tesla Powerwall batteries stacked up like playing cards in a deck in Art Hunter's home. The rest are computers and monitors.
The big white boxes on the left are three Tesla Powerwall batteries stacked up like playing cards in a deck in Art Hunter's home. The rest are computers and monitors. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED /Art Hunter
It pays to have a neighbour like Art Hunter.


The retired government scientist, whose resumé includes working on the Canadarm, is providing his rural Manotick neighbours with electricity to power their fridges, freezers, cellphones, electric kettles and much more.

It’s all thanks to his “microgrid” house that harnesses renewable energy from solar panels for electricity and geothermal energy to heat and cool the property.

When Saturday’s storm cut off his neighbours’ power supply and disrupted access to their well and septic systems, Hunter stepped in to help, offering up a place to refill on water and allowing people to run extension cords to his place to power their fridges and freezers.

Neighbours can also stop by to charge their cellphones.

“I’m half expecting a SWAT team to swoop in (and arrest me),” Hunter joked about the possible consequences for allowing several extension cords to run across a road to his property, located near Mahogany Harbour.


A geothermal heat exchanger is inserted into the ground on the property of Art Hunter.
A geothermal heat exchanger is inserted into the ground on the property of Art Hunter. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED /Art Hunter
Hunter said about three houses in the area are running extension cords to his house right now, while some neighbours are dropping by with household electronics to charge. He said neighbours using extension cords can swap out their fridges and freezes for other appliances provided they don’t exceed 16 amps.

The electricity produced from the solar panels are stored in batteries that power Hunter’s house and his electric vehicles. When the batteries are fully charged, power is then sent to Hydro One’s power grid.

The problem is the storm has disrupted access to the grid, meaning that when Hunter’s batteries are fully charged, any excess power is wasted, which he muses “isn’t very green”.

Since he started offering up power and water to his neighbours, Hunter said his place has become a “community gathering spot,” with those stopping in taking time to chat about the storm and the latest developments.

“It’s almost like a community centre.”

Some of the inverters for the solar system that are in the garage.
Some of the inverters for the solar system that are in the garage. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED /Art Hunter
On Monday, Hunter said he set up table outside his garage at 6 a.m. for people to leave their electronics while they charge, and around 30 minutes later neighbours were there to plug in.

He said he started working to make his house energy independent some five years ago, armed with his extensive knowledge of electronics and energy systems — he is, after all, a rocket scientist.

“I’m one of those people who like to plan to survive before the disaster,” he said of his inspiration.

A block diagram of the entire energy system.
A block diagram of the entire energy system. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED /Art Hunter
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Scientists confirm tornado touched down in Uxbridge
"One apartment building basically had its roof removed. So that is EF2 damage": scientist

Author of the article:Scott Laurie
Publishing date:May 24, 2022 • 11 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Residents of Uxbridge clean up after Saturday's storm that destroyed residential and commercial properties on May 23, 2022.
Residents of Uxbridge clean up after Saturday's storm that destroyed residential and commercial properties on May 23, 2022. PHOTO BY VERONICA HENRI /Toronto Sun/Postmedia Network
At least one tornado was embedded in the massive storm that hit southern Ontario, according to scientists from Western University.


“We have confirmed that the first part through Uxbridge was a tornado,” said David Sills, executive director, Northern Tornadoes Project.

The twister caused kilometres of damage that was examined for days after the deadly weekend storm, which claimed at least 10 lives in Ontario and Quebec.

“They collected enough data to confirm an EF2 tornado was along the leading edge of the derecho. So it was kind of embedded.”

The scientists say it was on the ground as of 1:15 p.m. Saturday and left nearly 4.3 kilometres of damage in its wake. It was also 260 metres wide and had winds of up to 190 km/h.


“The worse damage was to a couple of apartment buildings. One apartment building basically had its roof removed,” Sills said.

“So that is EF2 damage.”


The embedded tornado started on the western edge of Uxbridge, and went through the town.

In Uxbridge Tuesday, Debbie James was still without power and making due by eating at a local restaurant.

“It’s not easy because — where I live — we also don’t have water because we are on our own wells,” said James, who added that a local restaurant — still without power — has become a life-line.

“They are allowing us to come down here, and we can sit on the patio. They’ve brought in a generator. They’ve been so generous with everyone.”

The local power authority said some parts of the town could be without power for a week.

James said she heard at least 12 houses have been condemned.

As of Tuesday afternoon, the investigation into damage in Ottawa was still underway.

Sills said what much of the province experienced was what’s called a derecho: “a thunderstorm system that produces widespread damaging winds. It’s long-lived and fast moving, generally.”.

At least 138,000 customers were still without power across the province as of Tuesday evening.

Sills said it was fortunate the tornado did not kill anyone in Uxbridge.

“Considering that there were so many were killed by falling trees, it’s amazing that in this area of enhanced damage, that no one was killed,” he said.