Non-Coalition Coalition that’s Definitely NOT a Coalition…

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Hard to argue with a critter that can lick his own balls.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
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%38 of a judges' salary. Time to cut judges pay.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
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A question for federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

Sir, following the Liberals’ loss in last month’s Toronto-St. Paul’s byelection, you acknowledged Canadians are “done with Trudeau” and “frustrated with the Liberal party.”

Yet almost immediately you added that you would continue to honour the supply-and-confidence agreement, call it a Non-Coalition Coalition that’s definitely Not a Coalition-type Coalition, that keeps the Trudeau government in power.
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Doesn’t that mean you and your party are responsible for imposing an unpopular government on Canadians and denying them their democratic right to pass judgment on the Liberals in a general election?

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According to Canada338.com, there are just seven safe NDP ridings left in the country. Having hitched his party’s wagon closely to Trudeau’s star, all Singh may have achieved is making the NDP collateral damage to whatever disaster befalls the Trudeau Liberals.

The NDP will get what Singh deserves. Nearly every day on social media, Singh decries the Liberals for standing up for the rich and ignoring working people, yet every morning he begins his workday by confirming his support for the very same Liberals.

It may be the longest-running hypocrisy in Canadian political history.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,248
8,665
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Instead of flipping pancakes at a Stampede breakfast hosted by Chahal (MP George Chahal, who’s call for an urgent caucus meeting may have factored into Trudeau’s decision not to attend) on the opening weekend of the festival, as he did in 2023, the prime minister is choosing instead to attend an Islamic cultural event in the Greater Toronto area to shore up support in battleground Ontario.

Other than during the COVID pandemic, Trudeau has visited the Calgary Stampede every year since becoming leader of Liberal party in 2013, which is why his absence is glaring.

Political watchers say the absence of Trudeau (Liberal/NDP) and Singh (NDP/Liberal) are calculated defensive moves to protect against friendly fire they may encounter at the outdoor festival.
The Liberals only won two seats in Alberta, but currently hold 74 in Ontario from the last federal election in 2021:
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Vs now potentially:
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"Let’s face it there aren’t a lot of Liberals in Alberta. Why spend your time in Alberta when for Justin Trudeau the real game is in Toronto and Montreal,” says Nanos.

The NDP/Liberal leader is also a regular Stampede visitor, but Singh won’t be there this year due to "scheduling conflicts." But he could also be seeking space away from his provincial NDP counterpart Naheed Nenshi who has become a "frenemy."

"The Alberta NDP are popular but they want to sever links with the federal NDP," says Mount Royal University political scientist Duane Bratt. "It’s not a big deal if (Singh) doesn’t come. They have zero seats in Calgary."

Instead of wearing cowboy boots at the Stampede, Singh will be launching his summer tour with a town hall in the riding of Vancouver-Granville, where the NDP/Liberal party lost to the Liberal/NDP’s by just 431 votes in the 2021 election.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,248
8,665
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Politics is unpredictable. The election of Donald Trump as president in the U.S. could prompt a backlash in Canada against right-wing politicians here, but it is hard to fathom how re-electing Justin Trudeau, a leader Trump openly despises, would improve things.

Until last weekend, Marine Le Pen’s National Rally (RN) was on course to win a majority of seats in the French National Assembly. Yet, a coalition of leftist parties was cobbled together that saw 200 candidates opposed to RN drop out to give rival candidates a better chance of defeating the “far”-right party.

Could something similar happen in Canada in the form of a Liberal-NDP voting pact?
1720615464109.jpegIt’s possible. But Canadian voters appear to be motivated by the desire for a change in leadership: 84 per cent think it is time for a change of government, according to one recent Abacus Data poll, even if 29 per cent are not enamored with the alternatives. It would be a tough sell for any of the current Liberal cabinet or the NDP leader to claim they represent change.

The race does not always go to the party 20 points ahead in the polls but that’s the way to bet.
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Poilievre is no Trump or Le Pen and it seems like he is subtly fine-tuning his campaign message to reassure the doubters that he wants to recreate Stephen Harper’s (or even John Diefenbaker’s) Canada, not Trump’s America.
In his Stampede speech, Poilievre had fun with Trudeau’s absence from the greatest outdoor show on earth, advising his loyalists that the prime minister is “in panic mode.” “Don’t be offended that Justin Trudeau is hiding from you. He’s actually hiding from his own caucus too … Everyone is realizing that while the emperor has many costumes, he has no clothes,” he said.

For good measure, he took aim at many of the possible alternative Liberal leaders — “the squeaky little guy who is responsible for industry” (François-Philippe Champagne), “the housing minister who caused both an immigration crisis and a housing crisis in under two years” (Sean Fraser), “the finance minister whose idea of deficit reduction is cancelling Disney Plus” (Chrystia Freeland) and, last but not least, “Carbon Tax” (Mark) Carney.