Maternity Mistreatment

Serryah

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Dec 3, 2008
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Given the report, and given the "Protect the Fetus!" focus from the Republican/Extremists in the US, what are the odds that none of this will change at all, or that the stats will just grow instead of decline?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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You cant spot a propaganda piece when you see one?

How did the women know they were mistreated if they arent white? They self identified as white women for a day when they had another birth?

How do you know they were women when this is just a group of breeder chest feeders?

What did the Trans Women say?
 

Jinentonix

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You cant spot a propaganda piece when you see one?

How did the women know they were mistreated if they arent white? They self identified as white women for a day when they had another birth?

How do you know they were women when this is just a group of breeder chest feeders?

What did the Trans Women say?
What's interesting is there's no mention of what race the doctors were. I know up here for example having a doctor that comes from certain parts of the world is pretty much useless if you're a woman.
 
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Serryah

Executive Branch Member
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What's interesting is there's no mention of what race the doctors were. I know up here for example having a doctor that comes from certain parts of the world is pretty much useless if you're a woman.

The point is the Maternity Care, not what race the doctors were. It'd end up all the same, as it were anyway: women are getting less care than they used to, especially POC.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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This is a survey result about perception of mistreatment rather than clearly identified mistreatment. While in some cases, perceived mistreatment came from real mistreatment, it is likely not always the case. I think one would need to study the bias for perceiving mistreatment from each of these groups before one jumps to any conclusions.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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This is a survey result about perception of mistreatment rather than clearly identified mistreatment. While in some cases, perceived mistreatment came from real mistreatment, it is likely not always the case. I think one would need to study the bias for perceiving mistreatment from each of these groups before one jumps to any conclusions.
So its based on the temperaments of the patients by race.

Whats the point?

Do some need to work on getting their numbers up?
 

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
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This is a survey result about perception of mistreatment rather than clearly identified mistreatment. While in some cases, perceived mistreatment came from real mistreatment, it is likely not always the case. I think one would need to study the bias for perceiving mistreatment from each of these groups before one jumps to any conclusions.

Considering the listed mistreatments people experienced, the idea of it being "perception" is a little stretched, IMO.

Receiving no response to requests for help
Being shouted at or scolded
Not having their physical privacy protected
Being threatened with withholding treatment or made to accept unwanted treatment


Those are some pretty obvious ways to be mistreated, save the "no response to request for help". There could be reasons why there was no response, and there isn't any indication to say if the help just never came, or was merely delayed. Considering the short staff in hospitals, bells for patients who are requesting help from a nurse don't get answered right away for a lot of reasons.

That said, the other three, those are pretty obvious, or as you put it "clearly identified".
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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Considering the listed mistreatments people experienced, the idea of it being "perception" is a little stretched, IMO.

Receiving no response to requests for help
Being shouted at or scolded
Not having their physical privacy protected
Being threatened with withholding treatment or made to accept unwanted treatment


Those are some pretty obvious ways to be mistreated, save the "no response to request for help". There could be reasons why there was no response, and there isn't any indication to say if the help just never came, or was merely delayed. Considering the short staff in hospitals, bells for patients who are requesting help from a nurse don't get answered right away for a lot of reasons.

That said, the other three, those are pretty obvious, or as you put it "clearly identified".
Having been through some hospital stays this summer with my wife, often there is no response or delayed response to the buzzer. From what I gather the nurses normally have 6 patients per nurse (in USA they had 4) and this assumes everybody shows up for work. So I think everybody who is in the hospital any length of time has this issue.

I have seen nurses having shouting matches with patients -- usually the patients are yelling back at them,

Some times the curtains are broken. Our hospitals are underfunded.

The last one if true is unacceptable. Again with no specifics, I am skeptical.

I am not willing to accept the data as is without more investigation. Not saying there is not a problem but this survey does not prove to me there is a problem.
 
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Serryah

Executive Branch Member
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Having been through some hospital stays this summer with my wife, often there is no response or delayed response to the buzzer. From what I gather the nurses normally have 6 patients per nurse (in USA they had 4) and this assumes everybody shows up for work. So I think everybody who is in the hospital any length of time has this issue.

I have seen nurses having shouting matches with patients -- usually the patients are yelling back at them,

Some times the curtains are broken. Our hospitals are underfunded.

The last one if true is unacceptable. Again with no specifics, I am skeptical.

I am not willing to accept the data as is without more investigation. Not saying there is not a problem but this survey does not prove to me there is a problem.


This article throws a bit more information out there than the original CDC does.

In looking for more information about that last situation, I also came across this study from 2015


So mistreatments to mothers isn't a 'new' thing. This is just the most recent CDC study of it.

Actually there were a lot of studies that popped up, or articles discussing the issue.

And they all mention not just the specifics above, but other things too.


The survey, I think, was more to show that stats are increasing over previous years, which IS a problem.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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In Canada this summer, my wife had chest pains. She buzzed. They came on the intercom and asked. We waited about an hour for someone to show up. The nurse was short staffed. She had 9 or 10 patients. So a missed buzzer is not going to get me thinking about poor treatment. As hospitals tend to group cases on same floor, a short staffed maturity ward can cause a lot of it.

The thing I do believe is the insurance thing. My wife spent almost the whole month of June in a hospital in Scranton, PA. It was an excellent hospital. On the general wing they had 4 patients / nurse. Tons of nurses aids. On the critical care floor, they had 2 patients per nurse. But it was very pricey. I doubt they took medicare patients (aside from ones that came via ER). We came that route and my travel insurance covered it. But I can see all those complaints being lower at a place like that.
 

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
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In Canada this summer, my wife had chest pains. She buzzed. They came on the intercom and asked. We waited about an hour for someone to show up. The nurse was short staffed. She had 9 or 10 patients. So a missed buzzer is not going to get me thinking about poor treatment.

To you it may not be "poor treatment" but for the hospital, for the nurses, and usually for patients and their families, waiting an hour to answer a call IS poor treatment.

I've yet to see a family tolerate mom being left alone for an hour after buzzing for something in our hospital. In fact if no nurse is seen quickly, family will come look for someone.


As hospitals tend to group cases on same floor, a short staffed maturity ward can cause a lot of it.

True and I can admit as much, and did. That said, we don't know the reasons for missed call bells and circumstances the mother was in. Some situations are more understandable than others.

The thing I do believe is the insurance thing. My wife spent almost the whole month of June in a hospital in Scranton, PA. It was an excellent hospital. On the general wing they had 4 patients / nurse. Tons of nurses aids. On the critical care floor, they had 2 patients per nurse. But it was very pricey. I doubt they took medicare patients (aside from ones that came via ER). We came that route and my travel insurance covered it. But I can see all those complaints being lower at a place like that.

Agreed; where a patient is and how they pay is a big issue of it all, which is why a lot of this problem focuses on POC.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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"I want water".

Do you have upcoming tests? Possible surgery? Imagining? Are you being a baby? Does everyone on staff know your shoe size? Who would know? Is the Dr or lead nurse who does know available to answer the question?

Turn the tables.