Marijuana legalization.

Alberta'sfinest

Electoral Member
Dec 9, 2005
217
0
16
I'm going to attempt to dispell the myths sorrounding the legalization of marijuana. Please keep an open mind.
The legalization of marijuana is not only a good idea, but the best solution, whether you see it as a harmless passtime, or a dangerous drug. The biggest arguement for legalization, is that prohibition causes more problems than the use of the drug. Prohibition by default, creates a potential for black market trade, which is very evident. Black market trade puts money in the pockets of organized crime, and creates violence do to turf wars between rival gangs. Even innocent growers that are trying to just pay the bills, are subject to home invasions, with a possible outcome of violence and even death. The black market also allows for easier access to minors, and results in them dealing with possibly dangerous people. Prohibition is also very expensive to enforce, and the enforcement is very unsuccessful do to the organization and precautions taken by growers. Another problem with the black market trade is that quality of product is questionable, and may be laced with other drugs.

There is an arguement that decriminalization and harsher sentences for growers and trafficers will help. This is dead wrong, and a horrible way to go. Decriminalization is bad simply because it's just a way to make money from it's use, and wouldn't do anything to stop use, and would only breed contempt for the police. Harsher laws are even worse than weak ones, as higher risks will drive up the cost of the finished product, and increase profits of organized crime even more. Many users, mainly kids, are likely to use marijuana less if the cost were to rise, and substitute it for cheaper much more harmful drugs such as crack and crystal meth.

By legalizing, we could end the black market trade of marijuana tomorrow, and replace it with a regulated industry similar to tobacco and alcohol, which are both more harmful than marijuana. This would allow the product to be taxed, and this money could be directly allocated to social programs to help anyone who wishes to quit, and pay for a public health campaign to educate citizens on the risk of it's use. With regulations in place, it would be much harder for children to get access to it easily. I'd suggest an age of 16 to be ideal, as this is when most users start, and if it's restricted to them, they're likely to pass it up for something harder and easier to get. A major bonus is that it would save us a lot of money too, as we would no longer have to fund the policing involved with prohibition. This would free up more officers to tackle the dangerous drugs that are plaguing our country. Regulations could be put in place so that organized crime or major corporations wouldn't be able to take over the industry, creating thousands of jobs across the country, as well as a massive tourism industry.

Whether you smoke, or hate marijuana, this is what needs to be done to reduce the impact on our country. I don't think it's use will ever stop as people have been using it for thousands of years. We can only hope to limit it and control the situation to the furthest extent possible. Right now, we have no control of the situation, and were paying the price for our ignorance.
 

Suzique39

New Member
Dec 27, 2005
22
0
1
I have no heartburn with legalizing marijuana. I never used it as a young person, tried it once in my middle age and didn't like it. Never tried it again until I discussed it with my doctor for severe back pain. He said he couldn't prescribe it but it was worth a shot especially if it helped me to avoid some types of pain killers. It does help with pain, it does help with certain medical problems, and does help folks having to do Chemo to keep their appetites up. Hubby and I both use it once in a great while for pain. When we have no pain we forget it is in the freezer. Frankly while it helps with severe pain, I hate the high!

I have several younger friends who uses both for pain and recreationally , I see no harm in it.
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Decriminalization of Cannabis

I am in favour of the decriminalization of marihuana, as is, apparently, the committee of the Senate of Canada established to study the matter in detail (which subsequently recommended to the House of Commons that cannabis be decriminalized in certain cases).
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
8,366
3
38
Alberta'sfinest said:
and replace it with a regulated industry similar to tobacco and alcohol, which are both more harmful than marijuana. This would allow the product to be taxed, and this money could be directly allocated to social programs to help anyone who wishes to quit, and pay for a public health .....


Sounds like a great reason to not legalize it....
 

JomZ

Electoral Member
Aug 18, 2005
273
0
16
Reentering the Fray at CC.net
Alberta'sfinest wrote:
and replace it with a regulated industry similar to tobacco and alcohol, which are both more harmful than marijuana. This would allow the product to be taxed, and this money could be directly allocated to social programs to help anyone who wishes to quit, and pay for a public health .....



Sounds like a great reason to not legalize it....

But isnt that just a double standard that two products that are similar (Alcohol and Marijuana) but one is legal and the other is illegal.
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Taxation Issues

The Government of Canada should begin taxing other products, such as cannabis, simply due to our overwhelming federal debt. An incredible nineteen cents, out of every dollar of tax and revenue, is spent on interest payments on the debt; we need to pay down the principle, and higher taxes are one of the only ways to do it. We should, under no circumstances, be seeing significant tax decreases until that principle is going or gone.

:!: Edit Corrected a formatting problem.
 

Colpy

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 5, 2005
21,887
847
113
68
Saint John, N.B.
It seems a little difficult to find anyone sensible that is against at least the de-criminalization of marijuana.

I certainly think it should be legal. And yes, sold in liquor stores.

I am not so innocent as to believe marijuana is harmless, but nothing is. This should be personal choice.
 

bhoour

Electoral Member
May 10, 2005
608
0
16
earth
:hippy2:

I'm all for it!!! Decriminialization , legalization.... ( as long as quality is preemo! ) either or both.

It has always disturbed me that, a child molester can get 3 yrs, for completely altering someones life ( with time off for good behavior), but someone selling pot can get 10 yrs, for trying to enhance peoples lives.......?

no logic..........?


Perhaps everyone who decides on these laws should , sit down , smoke a fat one and re-evaluate.
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
8,366
3
38
I'm for it in principal, but in reality I know what this means.....what your paying $200.00 for now, will cost you $1000.00 in the future after the Feds and the Provincial governments are done with it.

Anyone who has watched their local Pot market over the last 10 years knows the market street price for Pot hasn't changed that much.

I pay enough in taxes, thanks.
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Taxation

We do not pay enough in taxes, with all due respect, Jay. If nineteen cents out of every dollar in tax and revenue is spent on interest payments on the federal debt, then taxes should be increased to compensate.
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
8,366
3
38
We used to pay a lot more on the tax dollar to service the debt, and somehow, even with tax cuts, we have managed to pay down some 50 billion....So I'm just not buying the argument. There are also the huge surpluses the Feds have....
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Surpluses are required, under the Ministry of Finance, to be used to pay down the debt. They are not available for tax cuts or program spending.
 

JomZ

Electoral Member
Aug 18, 2005
273
0
16
Reentering the Fray at CC.net
Surpluses or balanced budgets are the only acceptable budgets (unless disaster or tragic events happen). It has always been a double edged sword the Chretien government to put debt managment as the integral part of government finance.
 

bhoour

Electoral Member
May 10, 2005
608
0
16
earth
Re: RE: Marijuana legalization.

Jay said:
I'm for it in principal, but in reality I know what this means.....what your paying $200.00 for now, will cost you $1000.00 in the future after the Feds and the Provincial governments are done with it.

Anyone who has watched their local Pot market over the last 10 years knows the market street price for Pot hasn't changed that much.

I pay enough in taxes, thanks.

Your taxes that you are paying already go to fight against pot. With all that $$, they haven't made much progress .
'Magine if they just taxed the green, and saved on the rest?
Hmmm, over the last 10 yrs. at my local pot market the prices have increased.
Who is your dealer and can I get his #?

:hippy2:
 

FiveParadox

Governor General
Dec 20, 2005
5,875
43
48
Vancouver, BC
Proponent of Cannabis Taxation

An interesting observation; cannabis' more intimate name, marijuana, is referred to in Canadian legislation as marihuana (note the change in spelling). That's odd, though; I have only ever seen it with a "j" before I read one of the bills that died on the Order Paper.
 

Freethinker

Electoral Member
Jan 18, 2006
315
0
16
Colpy said:
It seems a little difficult to find anyone sensible that is against at least the de-criminalization of marijuana.

Stephen Harper is against the de-criminalization of marijuana. Maybe we need to hear his reasons, but I suspect this simply the result of having a conservative idealogy.

Legalize it, sell it at liquor outlets to provide jobs, revenue and to cut the drug money out of the hands of the gangs.
 

Colpy

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 5, 2005
21,887
847
113
68
Saint John, N.B.
Freethinker said:
Colpy said:
It seems a little difficult to find anyone sensible that is against at least the de-criminalization of marijuana.

Stephen Harper is against the de-criminalization of marijuana. Maybe we need to hear his reasons, but I suspect this simply the result of having a conservative idealogy.

Legalize it, sell it at liquor outlets to provide jobs, revenue and to cut the drug money out of the hands of the gangs.

Said it was "a little difficult"

Didn't say it was impossible! :)

And I agree with your post.