Hyperinflation is coming...

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
In unveiling the Trudeau government’s latest $8.9 billion plan not to fight inflation but to temporarily help some Canadians survive it, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland took a not-so-veiled shot at Conservative leadership race frontrunner Pierre Poilievre.

In a speech to the Empire Club in Toronto Thursday, without mentioning him by name, Freeland slammed Poilievre as “economically illiterate” for what she called his irresponsible criticism of the Bank of Canada and its governor, Tiff Macklem, whom Poilievre has said he will fire if he ever becomes prime minister.

BUT….But it was a bad idea for Freeland to raise the issue of economic illiteracy at all, given that her boss, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said during last year’s federal election campaign that he doesn’t think about monetary policy.

That means he doesn’t think about inflation. When asked about possible strategies for addressing inflation while on the campaign trail, Trudeau responded: “I don’t think about monetary policy.”

The Body of the story at the above link.

….And yet the prime minister tells us he doesn’t think about monetary policy, meaning he doesn’t think about inflation.

That’s being “economically illiterate” on steroids.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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B.C.
In unveiling the Trudeau government’s latest $8.9 billion plan not to fight inflation but to temporarily help some Canadians survive it, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland took a not-so-veiled shot at Conservative leadership race frontrunner Pierre Poilievre.

In a speech to the Empire Club in Toronto Thursday, without mentioning him by name, Freeland slammed Poilievre as “economically illiterate” for what she called his irresponsible criticism of the Bank of Canada and its governor, Tiff Macklem, whom Poilievre has said he will fire if he ever becomes prime minister.

BUT….But it was a bad idea for Freeland to raise the issue of economic illiteracy at all, given that her boss, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said during last year’s federal election campaign that he doesn’t think about monetary policy.

That means he doesn’t think about inflation. When asked about possible strategies for addressing inflation while on the campaign trail, Trudeau responded: “I don’t think about monetary policy.”

The Body of the story at the above link.

….And yet the prime minister tells us he doesn’t think about monetary policy, meaning he doesn’t think about inflation.

That’s being “economically illiterate” on steroids.
Funny the journalist‘s grasp of economic matters Trumps Poliviere . Who will prevail , stay tuned we will have a preview of Marco Mendocino taking the floor to a new level . We will return after this brief message .
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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May 28, 2007
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Toronto, ON
In unveiling the Trudeau government’s latest $8.9 billion plan not to fight inflation but to temporarily help some Canadians survive it, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland took a not-so-veiled shot at Conservative leadership race frontrunner Pierre Poilievre.

In a speech to the Empire Club in Toronto Thursday, without mentioning him by name, Freeland slammed Poilievre as “economically illiterate” for what she called his irresponsible criticism of the Bank of Canada and its governor, Tiff Macklem, whom Poilievre has said he will fire if he ever becomes prime minister.

BUT….But it was a bad idea for Freeland to raise the issue of economic illiteracy at all, given that her boss, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said during last year’s federal election campaign that he doesn’t think about monetary policy.

That means he doesn’t think about inflation. When asked about possible strategies for addressing inflation while on the campaign trail, Trudeau responded: “I don’t think about monetary policy.”

The Body of the story at the above link.

….And yet the prime minister tells us he doesn’t think about monetary policy, meaning he doesn’t think about inflation.

That’s being “economically illiterate” on steroids.
She is spending $8.9 billion to fight inflation? I never knew that throwing more money around helps with inflation. I guess I was economically illiterate too.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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She is spending $8.9 billion to fight inflation? I never knew that throwing more money around helps with inflation. I guess I was economically illiterate too.
You must be a Rhodes scholar with a journalism major to understand .
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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May 28, 2007
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Moccasin Flats
I went and bought half a bison for $500. My buddy doesn't want the skull or hide so in the end I'm eating for free/paid to eat. The skull and hide are already sold.
 
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IdRatherBeSkiing

Satelitte Radio Addict
May 28, 2007
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Toronto, ON
If people are stealing it, it’s probably more than an 11% increase in price on top of a 7%+ decrease in purchasing power due to inflation I’m assuming.
When the price goes up, it makes it a better target for theft. And retailers never want to be left holding the loss. They have no doubt added a small increase in the cost to cover their loss of inventory.
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Stats Can figures shows shoppers paying 20% more for food staples
“Canadians are feeling left behind and ripped off,” New Democrat MP Niki Ashton (Churchill-Keewatinook, Man.) told reporters.

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jul 07, 2022 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation

The statistics about food prices in Canada are startling.


Statistics Canada’s monthly average retail prices for selected products shows shoppers are paying 20% more for spaghetti, flour, cabbage and other staples according to Blacklock’s Reporter.

In its report released Wednesday, Stats Can says even the cheapest meats went up in price by a third or more year over year while a loaf of white bread averaged $4.

“Canadians are feeling left behind and ripped off,” New Democrat MP Niki Ashton (Churchill-Keewatinook, Man.) told reporters.

“Millions of Canadians are struggling right now. Historically high inflation, skyrocketing costs of living – working families are struggling to cover basic needs.”

Among the stats, British Columbians paid 16% for bacon to $7.59 per 500 grams in May compared to the same period last year.


Albertan shoppers paid 14% more for chicken thighs to $10.80 per kilogram and 18% more for stewing beef to $18.78 per kilogram.

Those in Saskatchewan paid 20% more for chicken breasts to $15.16 per kilogram and 57% more for vegetable oil to $13.88 per three litre jug.

Manitobans paid 23% more for iceberg lettuce to $2.83 per head and 34% more for mayonnaise to $5.50 per jar.

Ontario shoppers paid 16% more for butter to $5.91 per block, 25% more for pork ribs to $11.98 per kilogram and 37% more for chicken thighs to $12.12 per kilogram.

“Working people of this country who are struggling to deal with inflation and making ends meet are paying more than their fair share,” said Ashton.

“Canada is becoming a country that isn’t able to actually meet the needs of a growing number of Canadians.”
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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B.C.
Stats Can figures shows shoppers paying 20% more for food staples
“Canadians are feeling left behind and ripped off,” New Democrat MP Niki Ashton (Churchill-Keewatinook, Man.) told reporters.

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jul 07, 2022 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation

The statistics about food prices in Canada are startling.


Statistics Canada’s monthly average retail prices for selected products shows shoppers are paying 20% more for spaghetti, flour, cabbage and other staples according to Blacklock’s Reporter.

In its report released Wednesday, Stats Can says even the cheapest meats went up in price by a third or more year over year while a loaf of white bread averaged $4.

“Canadians are feeling left behind and ripped off,” New Democrat MP Niki Ashton (Churchill-Keewatinook, Man.) told reporters.

“Millions of Canadians are struggling right now. Historically high inflation, skyrocketing costs of living – working families are struggling to cover basic needs.”

Among the stats, British Columbians paid 16% for bacon to $7.59 per 500 grams in May compared to the same period last year.


Albertan shoppers paid 14% more for chicken thighs to $10.80 per kilogram and 18% more for stewing beef to $18.78 per kilogram.

Those in Saskatchewan paid 20% more for chicken breasts to $15.16 per kilogram and 57% more for vegetable oil to $13.88 per three litre jug.

Manitobans paid 23% more for iceberg lettuce to $2.83 per head and 34% more for mayonnaise to $5.50 per jar.

Ontario shoppers paid 16% more for butter to $5.91 per block, 25% more for pork ribs to $11.98 per kilogram and 37% more for chicken thighs to $12.12 per kilogram.

“Working people of this country who are struggling to deal with inflation and making ends meet are paying more than their fair share,” said Ashton.

“Canada is becoming a country that isn’t able to actually meet the needs of a growing number of Canadians.”
View attachment 14671
Nicki Ashton can vote down the government if she is so unhappy .
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Canadian food suppliers signal more price hikes coming
More price increases will hit grocery stores this fall in a year that has already seen nearly double digit increases in food costs.

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 13, 2022 • 20 hours ago • 1 minute read • 73 Comments

Canadian food suppliers are once again issuing notices to grocery retailers informing them of upcoming price hikes.


The letters signal more price increases will hit grocery stores this fall in a year that has already seen nearly double digit increases in food costs.

In some cases, the higher prices are due to the Canadian Dairy Commission’s approval of a second milk price increase this year, thatwhich will see farm gate milk prices go up about two cents per litre, or 2.5 per cent, on Sept. 1.

Yet dairy processing companies appear to also be tacking on their own increases, the so-called piggybacking of price hikes some industry observers warned would happen.

Lactalis Canada, for example, says in a letter to its customers it must implement an average national market increase of five per cent this September, a rate it says takes into account the CDC pricing increase and “significant inflationary costs” the company is facing.


Arla Foods Canada issued a similar notice, saying price increases on its products coming this September reflect higher milk ingredient costs and the “inflationary impacts across freight and packaging.”

The increases in milk and cheese prices being shared with grocers underscores how regulated dairy price increases are compounded by additional price hikes by companies, said Gary Sands, senior vice-president of public policy with the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers.

“The timing of the increases almost seems like they are piggybacking on top of the regulated increases,” he said. “The net effect is to further exacerbate the issue and concerns around affordability.”

Affordability concerns are especially acute in rural and remote communities where transportation and fuel surcharges are higher, Sands said.

“The increase in price for these essential products is of particular concern in those communities,” he added.

The price of food purchased at stores rose 9.7 per cent in May compared with a year ago as the cost of nearly everything in the grocery cart went higher, Statistics Canada said last month.