Feds ban on six single use plastics won't help much, says report

spaminator

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Feds ban on six single use plastics won't help much, says report
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Mar 14, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
The federal government plans on banning some commonly used plastic items, including straws.
The federal government plans on banning some commonly used plastic items, including straws. PHOTO BY FULLEMPTY /iStock / Getty Images
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The litter is a quitter.

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According to independent research, Ottawa’s expensive ban on six types of single use plastics won’t do much to save the environment, says Blacklock’s Reporter.

Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault has proposed regulations to ban a half dozen types of plastic products by 2024: polystyrene food containers, cutlery, stir sticks, straws, grocery bags and six-pack rings.

But researchers in the March issue of the Marine Pollution Bulletin said the blacklist excludes the most common plastic litter “such as wrappers and bottle caps.”

“This study indicated current Canadian single-use plastic measures are likely insufficient,” said the peer-reviewed report.

The study was based on plastic litter found in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, and Sable Island, N.S.

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Officials guess that Guilbeault’s ban would cost consumers more than $200 million yearly.

“The proposed regulations are expected to result in $205 million in the first year of full policy stringency, 2024,” said a Dec. 31 Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement. “These costs are significant.”

Among the measures proposed by the Environment Department were to place three-cent swingle-use plastic checkout bags with paper bags that cost eight cents each. The plan also calls for replacing plastic six-pack rings — worth three cents each — with cardboard alternatives which come at a cost of 34 cents apiece.

Back in 2020, federal regulators claimed they had targeted the most common types of single-use plastic litter.

The new study also found six companies — Nestlé, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, Tim Hortons, Starbucks and McDonald’s — accounted for a high amount of plastic litter.

“These six brands comprise 45% of branded litter collected from urban study locations,” researchers wrote.
 

Rosebud

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Feb 6, 2012
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Place all the plastic in a pile downwind of the next forest fire and let nature convert it to diesel fuel. Two birds with one stone.

See Youtube: "This man converts plastic to fuel"

Better still. Convert to Hydrogen, NOT ELECTRIC CARS. The fuel rewards everyone by changing the waste product to pure water.