Everything's Broken - latest Polievre youtube short

The_Foxer

Council Member
Aug 9, 2022
2,484
1,583
113

It's absolutely true that we won't solve the deaths or problems of drug addiction by giving drugs away free. The 'Safe injection' sites were supposed to keep deaths down radically, but in stead deaths have shot up dramatically. Getting people into rehab and helping them to rebuild their lives afterwards is the only thing that can work at all and even that doesn't have a 100 percent success rate. But at least it's better than leaving them addicted on the streets till they die.

I'm all over funding multiple rehab options and after rehab care and reintegration services AND bringing in crushing laws for drug dealers and the like.
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
948
480
63
TBF to TurdOWE BC has a government that doesn’t believe in jailing drug dealers or providing rehab. Only creating jobs for social workers.
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
948
480
63
They are few and far between and its a multitude of sectors benefiting.
There are thousands of social workers pipmping the poverty industry. Just that very few are in the front lines actually doing something to help.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,962
4,663
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
One of Canada’s leading experts on drug addiction says British Columbia’s provincial government asked him to delete a crucial database in an attempt to censor criticism of the province’s homeless policies. The incident appears to fit within a larger, nationwide campaign to silence experts who believe that, when it comes to homelessness and drugs, Canadian policy-makers are on the wrong track.

Dr. Julian Somers is a clinical psychologist and distinguished professor at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction.

In 2004, Somers established the “Inter-Ministry Evaluation Database” (IMED), which linked data about vulnerable populations across various B.C. ministries —  for example: days spent in hospital, detentions and criminal convictions, medications, and income assistance. This helped create detailed pictures of people’s lives, allowing researchers to more accurately measure the impacts of government policies.

Over the years, the database was used in over 30 provincial reports, 60 peer-reviewed publications and several graduate theses.

Somers then used the IMED for his own $20-million research project into anti-poverty programs in Vancouver. The project randomly divided 497 participants into three groups, giving each a different support program. Using the IMED to follow their lives over five years, it concluded that B.C.’s standard approach to homelessness was ineffective.

Armed with his study results, Somers worked with 14 non-profits to call for reforms to B.C.’s drug and homeless policies. In late February 2021, he presented his findings to several provincial deputy ministers.

A week later, the provincial government sent him a letter demanding that he destroy the IMED w

The official explanation was that the database was set to be retired at the end of the month, and that the government was creating its own inter-ministry database that would be broader (i.e. include family and income data) and be more efficient to operate.

Somers found the explanation implausible, and still does.He says there was no way to reconstruct the IMED’s core data in the new government project. Many people had consented to having their data used only because they participated in projects specifically related to the IMED, such as Somer’s aforementioned homeless study. That consent was non-transferrable.

The abrupt timing also troubled him, especially because the B.C. Ministry of Health had just renewed its commitment to the IMED for another year.

Somers refused to comply. He alleges that the government responded by simply prohibiting him from updating or analyzing the IMED, or using it for new projects, without the province’s written permission. Dr. Somers says this effectively rendered the database worthless.

Somers believes that in the nearly two years since, he has been “completely frozen out” by the B.C. government. He also alleges that he has been subject to an intimidation campaign by safe supply advocates.

He provided a copy of a July 2022 email from the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use, which lobbies for safe supply, showing that they lobbied for a conference to disinvite him from a speaking engagement.

The BCCSU did not respond to a request for comment.

“This government is actively hostile to the existence of the data, so I’ve completely given up. The work I was doing is no longer viable,” he says.

In B.C., as in much of Canada, the popular approach is to herd homeless people into housing where most, if not all, residents are fresh off the streets, creating a critical mass of trauma and addiction. These residents are then given a “safe supply” of free drugs and provided few resources for recovery and social reintegration.

Somers’ study showed that if you house homeless people in a way that disperses them into normal society, and then prioritize rehabilitation, employment and social reintegration, you see a 70 per cent reduction in crimes committed and a 50 per cent reduction in medical emergencies, all without spending more money.

The study confirmed the common-sense notion that it’s better to empower people to get back on their feet, rather than foster dependency through easy access to free drugs.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
25,307
5,940
113
B.C.
One of Canada’s leading experts on drug addiction says British Columbia’s provincial government asked him to delete a crucial database in an attempt to censor criticism of the province’s homeless policies. The incident appears to fit within a larger, nationwide campaign to silence experts who believe that, when it comes to homelessness and drugs, Canadian policy-makers are on the wrong track.

Dr. Julian Somers is a clinical psychologist and distinguished professor at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction.

In 2004, Somers established the “Inter-Ministry Evaluation Database” (IMED), which linked data about vulnerable populations across various B.C. ministries —  for example: days spent in hospital, detentions and criminal convictions, medications, and income assistance. This helped create detailed pictures of people’s lives, allowing researchers to more accurately measure the impacts of government policies.

Over the years, the database was used in over 30 provincial reports, 60 peer-reviewed publications and several graduate theses.

Somers then used the IMED for his own $20-million research project into anti-poverty programs in Vancouver. The project randomly divided 497 participants into three groups, giving each a different support program. Using the IMED to follow their lives over five years, it concluded that B.C.’s standard approach to homelessness was ineffective.

Armed with his study results, Somers worked with 14 non-profits to call for reforms to B.C.’s drug and homeless policies. In late February 2021, he presented his findings to several provincial deputy ministers.

A week later, the provincial government sent him a letter demanding that he destroy the IMED w

The official explanation was that the database was set to be retired at the end of the month, and that the government was creating its own inter-ministry database that would be broader (i.e. include family and income data) and be more efficient to operate.

Somers found the explanation implausible, and still does.He says there was no way to reconstruct the IMED’s core data in the new government project. Many people had consented to having their data used only because they participated in projects specifically related to the IMED, such as Somer’s aforementioned homeless study. That consent was non-transferrable.

The abrupt timing also troubled him, especially because the B.C. Ministry of Health had just renewed its commitment to the IMED for another year.

Somers refused to comply. He alleges that the government responded by simply prohibiting him from updating or analyzing the IMED, or using it for new projects, without the province’s written permission. Dr. Somers says this effectively rendered the database worthless.

Somers believes that in the nearly two years since, he has been “completely frozen out” by the B.C. government. He also alleges that he has been subject to an intimidation campaign by safe supply advocates.

He provided a copy of a July 2022 email from the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use, which lobbies for safe supply, showing that they lobbied for a conference to disinvite him from a speaking engagement.

The BCCSU did not respond to a request for comment.

“This government is actively hostile to the existence of the data, so I’ve completely given up. The work I was doing is no longer viable,” he says.

In B.C., as in much of Canada, the popular approach is to herd homeless people into housing where most, if not all, residents are fresh off the streets, creating a critical mass of trauma and addiction. These residents are then given a “safe supply” of free drugs and provided few resources for recovery and social reintegration.

Somers’ study showed that if you house homeless people in a way that disperses them into normal society, and then prioritize rehabilitation, employment and social reintegration, you see a 70 per cent reduction in crimes committed and a 50 per cent reduction in medical emergencies, all without spending more money.

The study confirmed the common-sense notion that it’s better to empower people to get back on their feet, rather than foster dependency through easy access to free drugs.
Come on there is to much money flying around to fix the problem .
 
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Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
51,341
4,527
113
Washington DC
Sounds like Canada, and to some extent I can't really get a fix on the provinces, are suffering two problems: one structural or systemic, and one of overregulation, by which I mean the government trying to do things a government in a Western country shouldn't do, at least not by fiat.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,962
4,663
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Come on there is to much money flying around to fix the problem .
Is there? Or is it that there is so much money flying around due to the problem that they don’t want to fix the problem?

Perhaps the above is just misinformation or disinformation as it conflicts with the current political policy viewpoint and might actually help solve the problem but will also reduce the volume of money flying around if the problem is fixed?
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
948
480
63
One of Canada’s leading experts on drug addiction says British Columbia’s provincial government asked him to delete a crucial database in an attempt to censor criticism of the province’s homeless policies. The incident appears to fit within a larger, nationwide campaign to silence experts who believe that, when it comes to homelessness and drugs, Canadian policy-makers are on the wrong track.

Dr. Julian Somers is a clinical psychologist and distinguished professor at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction.

In 2004, Somers established the “Inter-Ministry Evaluation Database” (IMED), which linked data about vulnerable populations across various B.C. ministries —  for example: days spent in hospital, detentions and criminal convictions, medications, and income assistance. This helped create detailed pictures of people’s lives, allowing researchers to more accurately measure the impacts of government policies.

Over the years, the database was used in over 30 provincial reports, 60 peer-reviewed publications and several graduate theses.

Somers then used the IMED for his own $20-million research project into anti-poverty programs in Vancouver. The project randomly divided 497 participants into three groups, giving each a different support program. Using the IMED to follow their lives over five years, it concluded that B.C.’s standard approach to homelessness was ineffective.

Armed with his study results, Somers worked with 14 non-profits to call for reforms to B.C.’s drug and homeless policies. In late February 2021, he presented his findings to several provincial deputy ministers.

A week later, the provincial government sent him a letter demanding that he destroy the IMED w

The official explanation was that the database was set to be retired at the end of the month, and that the government was creating its own inter-ministry database that would be broader (i.e. include family and income data) and be more efficient to operate.

Somers found the explanation implausible, and still does.He says there was no way to reconstruct the IMED’s core data in the new government project. Many people had consented to having their data used only because they participated in projects specifically related to the IMED, such as Somer’s aforementioned homeless study. That consent was non-transferrable.

The abrupt timing also troubled him, especially because the B.C. Ministry of Health had just renewed its commitment to the IMED for another year.

Somers refused to comply. He alleges that the government responded by simply prohibiting him from updating or analyzing the IMED, or using it for new projects, without the province’s written permission. Dr. Somers says this effectively rendered the database worthless.

Somers believes that in the nearly two years since, he has been “completely frozen out” by the B.C. government. He also alleges that he has been subject to an intimidation campaign by safe supply advocates.

He provided a copy of a July 2022 email from the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use, which lobbies for safe supply, showing that they lobbied for a conference to disinvite him from a speaking engagement.

The BCCSU did not respond to a request for comment.

“This government is actively hostile to the existence of the data, so I’ve completely given up. The work I was doing is no longer viable,” he says.

In B.C., as in much of Canada, the popular approach is to herd homeless people into housing where most, if not all, residents are fresh off the streets, creating a critical mass of trauma and addiction. These residents are then given a “safe supply” of free drugs and provided few resources for recovery and social reintegration.

Somers’ study showed that if you house homeless people in a way that disperses them into normal society, and then prioritize rehabilitation, employment and social reintegration, you see a 70 per cent reduction in crimes committed and a 50 per cent reduction in medical emergencies, all without spending more money.

The study confirmed the common-sense notion that it’s better to empower people to get back on their feet, rather than foster dependency through easy access to free drugs.
But that might cut into the jobs for social workers. They are the backbone of our socialist government that does so many things wrong.
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
948
480
63
Sounds like Canada, and to some extent I can't really get a fix on the provinces, are suffering two problems: one structural or systemic, and one of overregulation, by which I mean the government trying to do things a government in a Western country shouldn't do, at least not by fiat.
One of the problems when dogma trumps reality. Sort of a polar opposite to using a bible to govern. Same lack of reality.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
25,307
5,940
113
B.C.
Is there? Or is it that there is so much money flying around due to the problem that they don’t want to fix the problem?

Perhaps the above is just misinformation or disinformation as it conflicts with the current political policy viewpoint and might actually help solve the problem but will also reduce the volume of money flying around if the problem is fixed?
The poverty industry and the pimps that run it .
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,830
2,866
113
Edmonton
One of Canada’s leading experts on drug addiction says British Columbia’s provincial government asked him to delete a crucial database in an attempt to censor criticism of the province’s homeless policies. The incident appears to fit within a larger, nationwide campaign to silence experts who believe that, when it comes to homelessness and drugs, Canadian policy-makers are on the wrong track.

Dr. Julian Somers is a clinical psychologist and distinguished professor at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction.

In 2004, Somers established the “Inter-Ministry Evaluation Database” (IMED), which linked data about vulnerable populations across various B.C. ministries —  for example: days spent in hospital, detentions and criminal convictions, medications, and income assistance. This helped create detailed pictures of people’s lives, allowing researchers to more accurately measure the impacts of government policies.

Over the years, the database was used in over 30 provincial reports, 60 peer-reviewed publications and several graduate theses.

Somers then used the IMED for his own $20-million research project into anti-poverty programs in Vancouver. The project randomly divided 497 participants into three groups, giving each a different support program. Using the IMED to follow their lives over five years, it concluded that B.C.’s standard approach to homelessness was ineffective.

Armed with his study results, Somers worked with 14 non-profits to call for reforms to B.C.’s drug and homeless policies. In late February 2021, he presented his findings to several provincial deputy ministers.

A week later, the provincial government sent him a letter demanding that he destroy the IMED w

The official explanation was that the database was set to be retired at the end of the month, and that the government was creating its own inter-ministry database that would be broader (i.e. include family and income data) and be more efficient to operate.

Somers found the explanation implausible, and still does.He says there was no way to reconstruct the IMED’s core data in the new government project. Many people had consented to having their data used only because they participated in projects specifically related to the IMED, such as Somer’s aforementioned homeless study. That consent was non-transferrable.

The abrupt timing also troubled him, especially because the B.C. Ministry of Health had just renewed its commitment to the IMED for another year.

Somers refused to comply. He alleges that the government responded by simply prohibiting him from updating or analyzing the IMED, or using it for new projects, without the province’s written permission. Dr. Somers says this effectively rendered the database worthless.

Somers believes that in the nearly two years since, he has been “completely frozen out” by the B.C. government. He also alleges that he has been subject to an intimidation campaign by safe supply advocates.

He provided a copy of a July 2022 email from the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use, which lobbies for safe supply, showing that they lobbied for a conference to disinvite him from a speaking engagement.

The BCCSU did not respond to a request for comment.

“This government is actively hostile to the existence of the data, so I’ve completely given up. The work I was doing is no longer viable,” he says.

In B.C., as in much of Canada, the popular approach is to herd homeless people into housing where most, if not all, residents are fresh off the streets, creating a critical mass of trauma and addiction. These residents are then given a “safe supply” of free drugs and provided few resources for recovery and social reintegration.

Somers’ study showed that if you house homeless people in a way that disperses them into normal society, and then prioritize rehabilitation, employment and social reintegration, you see a 70 per cent reduction in crimes committed and a 50 per cent reduction in medical emergencies, all without spending more money.

The study confirmed the common-sense notion that it’s better to empower people to get back on their feet, rather than foster dependency through easy access to free drugs.
It seems that our governments don't have our best interests at heart anymore if they ever did. The B.C. government is simply being exposed as to how inefficient, ignores science while claiming that it IS science, have experts that aren't really experts at all but propagandists who say they are experts and the REAL experts are silenced because it goes against their ideology. It's disgusting and we need to get off our asses and fight this or we'll lose the country and have nothing but "air heads" in power.