Canadians likely to be targeted by foreign actors in next election, cyber agency says

spaminator

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Canadians likely to be targeted by foreign actors in next election, cyber agency says
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 3 minute read • 64 Comments
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019.
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. PHOTO BY GRAHAM HUGHES /THE CANADIAN PRESS
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OTTAWA — The federal cybersecurity agency is warning that Canadians are likely to run into some effort by foreign actors to influence or otherwise interfere with their right to vote in the next election.

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The Communications Security Establishment also says in a new report released on Friday that holding an election during the COVID-19 pandemic could increase the threat of foreign interference because of the need to move more parts online.

Chrissy Teigen 'lost' after becoming member of 'cancel club'
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But it expressed confidence in Elections Canada, saying: “While any modifications to the electoral process have the potential to increase the cyber threat, we assess that the planned changes do not substantially expand the cyber threat to Canada’s democratic process.”


The CSE report comes only weeks before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to kick off a federal election, sending Canadians to the polls for the second time since 2019.

Such an election will almost certainly look different than anything Canada has seen before because of the pandemic, with more activities and processes being moved online to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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One specific area of concern identified by the CSE was around an expected increase in the number of Canadians who vote by mail, with the agency warning foreign actors could try to use that as a way to undercut confidence in the election results.

“We assess that it is very likely that false information connecting voting by mail to voter fraud will circulate in Canada in relation to the next federal election,” according to the report.

The CSE nonetheless believes such “false narratives” will pale in comparison to the rampant allegations of voter fraud during last year’s U.S. presidential election, which were often perpetuated by Donald Trump and his supporters.


And while the CSE believes most Canadians will experience some type of attempt to influence them, it says Canada “remains a lower-priority target for online foreign influence activity relative to some other countries.”

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The fact Canada’s federal elections remain paper-based is also held up as a major reason for confidence along with what CSE describes as Elections Canada’s “robust” defences and several other measures adopted by the government in recent years.

The CSE report blames the majority of online attacks and threats to democratic processes in Canada and other parts of the world since 2015 on foreign governments, with most perpetrated by actors within Russia, China and Iran.

Canada is a potential target, according to the report, because of its active role on the world stage, which can have an impact on other countries, foreign groups and individuals.

“Threat actors may use cyber tools to target Canada’s democratic process to change election outcomes, influence policy-makers’ choice, impact governmental relationships with foreign and domestic partners, and impact Canada’s reputation around the world,” it said.

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And while Canada may have good defences and not be a major target now, the CSE said a growing number of actors have the tools, capacity and understanding of this country’s political landscape to take action in the future “should they have the strategic intent.”

The number of attacks on elections around the world rose substantially between 2015 and 2017, according to the CSE, but has since stabilized. And while the threats have become more sophisticated, so have the measures adopted by governments to protect themselves.

Voters are more frequently targeted than political parties and actual elections, the CSE added, likely because foreign actors believe it is easier and more effective.

And while political parties and candidates will likely be targeted in the next vote, “we assess that this activity is very unlikely to be part of a sophisticated cyber campaign against a particular Canadian political party or candidate.”
 

Dixie Cup

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Sep 16, 2006
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Canadians likely to be targeted by foreign actors in next election, cyber agency says
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 3 minute read • 64 Comments
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019.
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. PHOTO BY GRAHAM HUGHES /THE CANADIAN PRESS
Article content
OTTAWA — The federal cybersecurity agency is warning that Canadians are likely to run into some effort by foreign actors to influence or otherwise interfere with their right to vote in the next election.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The Communications Security Establishment also says in a new report released on Friday that holding an election during the COVID-19 pandemic could increase the threat of foreign interference because of the need to move more parts online.

Chrissy Teigen 'lost' after becoming member of 'cancel club'
Close sticky video
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But it expressed confidence in Elections Canada, saying: “While any modifications to the electoral process have the potential to increase the cyber threat, we assess that the planned changes do not substantially expand the cyber threat to Canada’s democratic process.”


The CSE report comes only weeks before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to kick off a federal election, sending Canadians to the polls for the second time since 2019.

Such an election will almost certainly look different than anything Canada has seen before because of the pandemic, with more activities and processes being moved online to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
One specific area of concern identified by the CSE was around an expected increase in the number of Canadians who vote by mail, with the agency warning foreign actors could try to use that as a way to undercut confidence in the election results.

“We assess that it is very likely that false information connecting voting by mail to voter fraud will circulate in Canada in relation to the next federal election,” according to the report.

The CSE nonetheless believes such “false narratives” will pale in comparison to the rampant allegations of voter fraud during last year’s U.S. presidential election, which were often perpetuated by Donald Trump and his supporters.


And while the CSE believes most Canadians will experience some type of attempt to influence them, it says Canada “remains a lower-priority target for online foreign influence activity relative to some other countries.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The fact Canada’s federal elections remain paper-based is also held up as a major reason for confidence along with what CSE describes as Elections Canada’s “robust” defences and several other measures adopted by the government in recent years.

The CSE report blames the majority of online attacks and threats to democratic processes in Canada and other parts of the world since 2015 on foreign governments, with most perpetrated by actors within Russia, China and Iran.

Canada is a potential target, according to the report, because of its active role on the world stage, which can have an impact on other countries, foreign groups and individuals.

“Threat actors may use cyber tools to target Canada’s democratic process to change election outcomes, influence policy-makers’ choice, impact governmental relationships with foreign and domestic partners, and impact Canada’s reputation around the world,” it said.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
And while Canada may have good defences and not be a major target now, the CSE said a growing number of actors have the tools, capacity and understanding of this country’s political landscape to take action in the future “should they have the strategic intent.”

The number of attacks on elections around the world rose substantially between 2015 and 2017, according to the CSE, but has since stabilized. And while the threats have become more sophisticated, so have the measures adopted by governments to protect themselves.

Voters are more frequently targeted than political parties and actual elections, the CSE added, likely because foreign actors believe it is easier and more effective.

And while political parties and candidates will likely be targeted in the next vote, “we assess that this activity is very unlikely to be part of a sophisticated cyber campaign against a particular Canadian political party or candidate.”
Nothing should change - all voters to vote in person, with applicable ID. Only those who are outside of the country should have mail-in ballots. Too easy! Covid SHOULD NOT be a consideration any more.
 

spaminator

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Heritage minister says offensive Twitter posts undermining Canada’s democracy
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read • 34 Comments
Potential new rules about internet regulation continue to confuse and divide Canadians.
Potential new rules about internet regulation continue to confuse and divide Canadians. PHOTO BY ISTOCK /GETTY IMAGES
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Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault’s department says lawful but offensive Twitter posts are undermining Canada’s democracy.

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“This content steals and damages lives,” wrote staff in a briefing note according to Blacklock’s Reporter. “It intimidates and obscures valuable voices, preventing a truly democratic debate.”


On June 23, Cabinet introduced Bill C-36 — an Act to Amend the Criminal Code — that threatens Facebook, Twitter and YouTube users suspected of posting content that promotes “detestation or vilification” with house arrest or $70,000 fines.

“Our objective is to ensure more accountability and transparency from online platforms while respecting the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” said the June 16 briefing note on Regulation of Social Media Platforms “The mandate of the Department of Canadian Heritage includes the promotion of a greater understanding of human rights.”

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In 1970, Parliament banned banned hate speech.

“Social media platforms such as Facebook or Twitter are increasingly central to participation in democratic, cultural and public life,” said the briefing note.

“However, social media platforms can also be used to threaten, intimidate, bully and harass people or used to promote racist, anti-Semitic, Islamophobic, misogynist and homophobic views that target communities, put people’s safety at risk and undermine Canada’s social cohesion or democracy.”

The briefing note provided no examples.

On June 23, a Department of Justice backgrounder to Bill C-36 said it “would apply to public communications by individual users on the internet, including on social media, on personal websites and in mass emails,” blog posts, online news sites, “operators of websites that primarily publish their own content” and user comment sections.


A survey by the Canadian Internet Registration Authority found 62% of Canadians fear federal regulation of the internet will curb lawful speech.

“With the federal government considering legislation that could have far reaching impacts on social media, a healthy majority of Canadians agree with the concept of a law that would require platforms to remove illegal or harmful content,” said the survey report, called Canadians Deserve a Better Internet.

“But their attitudes are tempered by concerns about hampering free expression.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,020
1,172
113
Canadians likely to be targeted by foreign actors in next election, cyber agency says
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 3 minute read • 64 Comments
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019.
A man arrives to cast his ballot at a polling station on federal election day in Shawinigan, Que., Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. PHOTO BY GRAHAM HUGHES /THE CANADIAN PRESS
Article content
OTTAWA — The federal cybersecurity agency is warning that Canadians are likely to run into some effort by foreign actors to influence or otherwise interfere with their right to vote in the next election.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The Communications Security Establishment also says in a new report released on Friday that holding an election during the COVID-19 pandemic could increase the threat of foreign interference because of the need to move more parts online.

Chrissy Teigen 'lost' after becoming member of 'cancel club'
Close sticky video
Trackerdslogo
But it expressed confidence in Elections Canada, saying: “While any modifications to the electoral process have the potential to increase the cyber threat, we assess that the planned changes do not substantially expand the cyber threat to Canada’s democratic process.”


The CSE report comes only weeks before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to kick off a federal election, sending Canadians to the polls for the second time since 2019.

Such an election will almost certainly look different than anything Canada has seen before because of the pandemic, with more activities and processes being moved online to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
One specific area of concern identified by the CSE was around an expected increase in the number of Canadians who vote by mail, with the agency warning foreign actors could try to use that as a way to undercut confidence in the election results.

“We assess that it is very likely that false information connecting voting by mail to voter fraud will circulate in Canada in relation to the next federal election,” according to the report.

The CSE nonetheless believes such “false narratives” will pale in comparison to the rampant allegations of voter fraud during last year’s U.S. presidential election, which were often perpetuated by Donald Trump and his supporters.


And while the CSE believes most Canadians will experience some type of attempt to influence them, it says Canada “remains a lower-priority target for online foreign influence activity relative to some other countries.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The fact Canada’s federal elections remain paper-based is also held up as a major reason for confidence along with what CSE describes as Elections Canada’s “robust” defences and several other measures adopted by the government in recent years.

The CSE report blames the majority of online attacks and threats to democratic processes in Canada and other parts of the world since 2015 on foreign governments, with most perpetrated by actors within Russia, China and Iran.

Canada is a potential target, according to the report, because of its active role on the world stage, which can have an impact on other countries, foreign groups and individuals.

“Threat actors may use cyber tools to target Canada’s democratic process to change election outcomes, influence policy-makers’ choice, impact governmental relationships with foreign and domestic partners, and impact Canada’s reputation around the world,” it said.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
And while Canada may have good defences and not be a major target now, the CSE said a growing number of actors have the tools, capacity and understanding of this country’s political landscape to take action in the future “should they have the strategic intent.”

The number of attacks on elections around the world rose substantially between 2015 and 2017, according to the CSE, but has since stabilized. And while the threats have become more sophisticated, so have the measures adopted by governments to protect themselves.

Voters are more frequently targeted than political parties and actual elections, the CSE added, likely because foreign actors believe it is easier and more effective.

And while political parties and candidates will likely be targeted in the next vote, “we assess that this activity is very unlikely to be part of a sophisticated cyber campaign against a particular Canadian political party or candidate.”
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taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,222
474
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Sounds like the liberal party saying don't worry we already rigged the election so no foreigner can fiddle with it.
I am pretty sure that the next election will be fiddled with and rigged by our dear comrade leader Fidel Trudeau. Didn't Joe BiDumb get elected president because of voting fraud. I predict that comrade Fidel Trudeau will be the next crime mistake of canukistan again. I will be putting my money on Fidel. Any bets here?