Canada's New Governor General Designate

taxslave

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Nov 25, 2008
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The bureaucrats are more in love with the system than the so called beneficiaries. They would hate for anyone to move on and not require them to consult and hold meetings. The only use of the indigenous people is to justify the cause and purpose for their work. After that it is all about the jobs. Nobody working late on a Friday in that department.

75% of project funding never sees the job site. That's "white people" looking after things they know nothing about.

4 tasks of management are to plan and Canada has great planners. Organizing they are not so good at. Leading and Controlling they have no clue because they have never lead or controlled anything in their lives. They consider themselves born leaders who require no experience.

Watch season 3 of the Soprano's. Same story line.
That is largely because the government does not believe in promoting on merit, or even seniority. Connections and being the flavour of the day is most important.
 
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spaminator

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Mary Simon installed as 30th Governor General, first Indigenous person to hold role
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 26, 2021 • 8 hours ago • 3 minute read • 50 Comments
Mary Simon attends a news conference where she is announced as the next Governor General of Canada in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada July 6, 2021. REUTERS/Patrick Doyle
Mary Simon attends a news conference where she is announced as the next Governor General of Canada in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada July 6, 2021. REUTERS/Patrick Doyle PHOTO BY PATRICK DOYLE /REUTERS
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OTTAWA — Canada’s first Indigenous Governor General is promising to meet Canadians across the country, understand their concerns and bring a renewed purpose to her office “to meet this moment” in the country’s shared history.

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Mary Simon, an Inuk leader and former Canadian diplomat, became the country’s 30th representative of the head of state on Monday. She is the fifth woman to fill the role.


Simon pledged to help the country reckon with the historical mistreatment of Indigenous Peoples, including horrific findings of unmarked graves at the sites of former residential schools, while charting a path forward.

In her maiden speech, Simon spoke about straddling the worlds of her Inuit upbringing and the non-Inuit south, and noted that reconciliation won’t be completed through projects or services, but is rather a way of life that requires daily work and getting to know one another.

“To meet this moment as Governor General, I will strive to hold together the tension of the past with the promise of the future, in a wise and thoughtful way,” Simon said in her speech, where at times she spoke in Inuktitut.

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“Our society must recognize together our moments of regret, alongside those that give us pride, because it creates space for healing, acceptance and the rebuilding of trust. I will strive to build bridges across the diverse backgrounds and cultures that reflect our great country’s uniqueness and promise.”

She also spoke of the need to address climate change and the impact warming temperatures have had on the North, and her dedication to addressing mental health issues as she takes office.


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau named Simon as his choice to be the Queen’s representative in Canada earlier this month, replacing Julie Payette who resigned in January.

On Monday, Trudeau said Simon shows that true leadership is about building a brighter future for all, and not just for a lucky few, which the country needs now as it rebuilds from the pandemic.

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Simon was greeted by a First Nations drumming circle as she arrived at the Senate building, and was accompanied by a traditional Inuit drummer on her way into the Senate chamber. Inside the chamber, a traditional Inuit oil lamp remained lit during the ceremony.

Once officially in the role, Simon took her seat at the head of the Senate chamber and her husband, Whit Fraser, turned to her, took a small bow and then sat down next to her amid applause.

“Clearly, this signals a further step on the path toward reconciliation, with the Indigenous Peoples of Canada starting to find our rightful place in Confederation,” said David Chartrand, president of the Manitoba Metis Federation, in a statement on Simon’s installation.

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Cailtlyn Baikie, a 29-year-old Inuk from Nain in northern Labrador who has known Simon for a decade, said Simon will carry a heaviness in her new job, including questions about whether an Indigenous person should represent the Crown.

“I’m of the viewpoint that if you have an opportunity to shed light on something and to change the trajectory of anything that you care about, and in her case, the country, you should take it,” Baikie said from Cartwright, N.L.

Baikie also called Simon a “compassionate, genuine, caring person.”

Trudeau was among the 44 people allowed to witness the ceremony in person as public health guidelines set limits on attendance and mask requirements for all in the chamber.

Despite requests from officials that people avoid gathering, a crowd of people stood across the street, awaiting Simon’s arrival for the ceremony.

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When she stepped on to the red carpet, the crowd clapped and cheered. As the cheering quieted, someone in the crowd yelled, “down with the monarchy,” before adding, “free yourselves.”

There was no such yelling during a visit after the ceremony to the National War Memorial as commander-in-chief, nor when she arrived at Rideau Hall where she greeted dozens of friends and family members who lined the entrance.

But not everyone may have been clapping.

Official languages commissioner Raymond Theberge has launched a probe into Simon’s selection after receiving over 400 complaints about her inability to speak French fluently.

In a statement immediately after Simon’s installation, Trudeau noted she would represent Canadians in both official languages. Simon said in her speech that she had heard from Canadians encouraged at her pledge to learn the language, including offers of help.

Speaking in St. John’s, N.L., Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole congratulated Simon, calling it an important day for the country, and welcomed her commitment to learn French, noting it was important for the Governor General to speak both official languages.
 

spaminator

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Governor General will agree to a Trudeau request to call snap election: Experts
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 28, 2021 • 9 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Governor General Mary Simon and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speak as Sophie Gregoire Trudeau and Whit Fraser look take part in the Signing of the Oath Registry after Simon took the oath to become the 30th Governor General of Canada in Ottawa, July 26, 2021.
Governor General Mary Simon and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speak as Sophie Gregoire Trudeau and Whit Fraser look take part in the Signing of the Oath Registry after Simon took the oath to become the 30th Governor General of Canada in Ottawa, July 26, 2021. PHOTO BY SEAN KILPATRICK /Pool via REUTERS
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OTTAWA — The long-standing tradition of the Governor General acceding to Canadian prime ministers’ requests to dissolve Parliament will practically push Mary Simon to accept a plea from Justin Trudeau to call an election, a constitutional law expert said Wednesday.

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NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has asked Simon to refuse any request from Trudeau that would send voters to the ballot box, noting that the fixed-election law states that every general election must be held on the third Monday of October four calendar years after the last one.


Singh said in a letter to the newly installed Governor General that the law allows for an early election if the government has lost the confidence of the House, but the Trudeau government has won every confidence vote it has faced including on the speech from the throne and the budget.

Ottawa University law professor Errol Mendes said the Governor General as a representative of the Queen has in theory the power to refuse a request from Trudeau to dissolve Parliament. However, that power has not been used for many decades because Canada has been regarded as an independent country from the United Kingdom.

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“I don’t think (Simon) will accede to the leader of the NDP’s request. There’s no chance whatsoever,” he said.

Anticipation of an early election call is rising as federal party leaders, including Trudeau and Singh, have been travelling around the county on campaign-style tours in recent weeks.

Speaking to reporters Wednesday in St. John’s, N.L., Trudeau repeated his frequent claim that Parliament has been dysfunctional as Conservative MPs have been using “procedural tactics” to delay and block what he said are “important progressive pieces of legislation.”

He said the NDP did nothing to help his Liberal government pass laws including one to ban conversion therapy and another to eliminate mandatory minimum criminal sentences.

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“(The NDP) could have stood with us to move forward faster,” Trudeau said.

“Canadians deserve to have governments and parliamentarians focused on them, not focused on politicking.”


However, the New Democrats have said they were a clear and willing partner to expedite the conversion therapy bill and have blamed the Liberals for allowing the legislation to stall in the Senate before it rose for a summer break in June.

Trudeau didn’t directly answer a question on whether he believes the Governor General should accept an election call request from him and whether her refusal could undermine Canada’s independence.

Mendes said the prime minister has the right to ask the Governor General to call an early election under the Constitution and the fixed-election law brought in by the Harper government did not change that.

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He said Singh also noted in his letter the ongoing pandemic and unfinished legislative work as reasons to refuse a request from Trudeau, but there are precedents in the past where the country was in crisis and the governor general agreed to dissolve Parliament.

Annalise Acorn, a law professor in the University of Alberta, said Singh’s letter seems to be “political posturing without any serious expectation that it will be acted upon by the (Governor General).”

She said the reasons Singh listed in his letter for why he is asking Simon to reject an early election request from Trudeau are political while the Governor General office is designed to function above partisan battles.

“My guess would be that it’s all for show,” she said in an email.

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“Without even knowing what would be put in place to facilitate voting during the pandemic, Singh is asking (Simon) to assume that the precautions or accommodations would be insufficient.”

Acorn added: “There are very strong constitutional conventions in place that would lead (Simon) to think it’s not her business to go against the advice of (Trudeau) on this one.”

Mendes said the last occasion in Canadian history where the governor general refused an early election request was in 1926 when Lord Julian Byng refused prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King’s request to dissolve Parliament and call fresh elections.

That refusal led to a constitutional crisis known as the King-Byng Affair, where Byng asked the next largest party in Parliament at that time to form a government, but the arrangement didn’t last very long.

There was a subsequent election that Mackenzie King won after campaigning on the basis that the governor general does not really have the right to reject a request from the prime minister to dissolve Parliament.

Though scholars disagree as to whether Byng’s decision was the right one, Mendes said the crisis will likely be brought to the attention of Simon and she will basically “learn from that situation,” and accept the anticipated request from Trudeau to call an early election.
 

JLM

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Nov 27, 2008
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I did not know that I was slagging the entire Indian race? Where did I do that? :unsure:
" The Indians need to stop whining and do something for a change"...................I would say that quote comes pretty close! :)
 

Dixie Cup

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Sep 16, 2006
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That is largely because the government does not believe in promoting on merit, or even seniority. Connections and being the flavour of the day is most important.
I believe it's also known as - "it's not what you know, but who you know". That is absolutely the government for sure (from personal experience).
 
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taxslave

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Promoting based on seniority is often a huge mistake, although it can be a good way of collecting dinosaurs. :)
Straight seniority is no better than political appointments for getting substandard managers. Either way you mostly get lifers who are more interested in their own security than doing their job. All other factors being equal, then the highest seniority gets it.
 

taxme

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Feb 11, 2020
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" The Indians need to stop whining and do something for a change"...................I would say that quote comes pretty close! :)

Your opinion and not mine. If I had said the same thing that white people should stop whining and go out and find a job, you would probably agree with me 100%, right? You see, it is alright to mock and attack white people, but never mock or attack any non-white people. To mock or attack non-whites would be seen as blasphemy. And would also be seen as attacking the sacred cow of multiculturalism and diversity. A big no-no to do thing these days. (n)
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,111
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Vernon, B.C.
I did not know that I was slagging the entire Indian race? Where did I do that? :unsure:
Perhaps you might want to reread what you wrote in Posts # 36 and #74. No you never said "entire", but you also never said "some" or "few" or "several" so I can only surmise that what you did say was what you thought to be typical of the Indians. :)
 

taxslave

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Nov 25, 2008
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Your opinion and not mine. If I had said the same thing that white people should stop whining and go out and find a job, you would probably agree with me 100%, right? You see, it is alright to mock and attack white people, but never mock or attack any non-white people. To mock or attack non-whites would be seen as blasphemy. And would also be seen as attacking the sacred cow of multiculturalism and diversity. A big no-no to do thing these days. (n)
Multiculti and diversity are the two worst plagues visited on our country.
 
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