Canada’s Military current state & equipment

Taxslave2

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They could eliminate all the bureaucratic stuff in Ottawa. Put control in the hands of people that actually know something. My son works for a company that is making piping pieces for the new ships that are slowly being built in Vancouver. Specs change almost daily. It is like they are drawing the detailed drawings as they go. This only works in a cost plus method of construction.
 
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petros

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They could eliminate all the bureaucratic stuff in Ottawa. Put control in the hands of people that actually know something. My son works for a company that is making piping pieces for the new ships that are slowly being built in Vancouver. Specs change almost daily. It is like they are drawing the detailed drawings as they go. This only works in a cost plus method of construction.
Son is a fitter?
 

Ron in Regina

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Theodore Roosevelt enunciated the “Big Stick” approach to diplomacy and foreign policy. “Speak softly, but carry a big stick. You will go far,” he said.

Countries should negotiate peacefully, but possess enough military power to fall back on if things go wrong.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau uses the opposite philosophy.

He and his ministers have no hesitation in loudly virtue-signalling Canada’s position on everything from climate change to gender equality to international audiences. He has no qualms about loudly offending any friendly country with which he disagrees.

He lectured Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni on LGBTQ rights at the G-7 summit in May.

He’s reduced our status among our despairing allies to the equivalent of the kids’ table at NATO.

His scorched-earth handling of allegations that India murdered a Sikh activist in this country has reduced diplomatic relations to a charred heap, with India now expelling 41 of our diplomats.

While the U.S. has tacitly acknowledged they supplied the “credible information,” on which Trudeau based his accusation, other Western leaders are not rushing to support us. This week, Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly finally acknowledged they need to take talks with India “privately.Foreign affairs is not a role for on-the-job learning.

As for the “big stick,” this country has none. Our military is a shadow of its former self. Last week, we heard there’s a plan to cut $1 billion from defence spending. Testifying at the House of Commons defence committee, Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre detailed the ramifications of the cuts.

“There’s no way you can take almost $1 billion out of the defence budget and not have an impact,” he told the committee. While Defence Minister Bill Blair denied cuts are in the works, it seems senior officials in his ministry disagree.

Our military spending at this time of international turmoil is an embarrassment. Our contribution to NATO is only 1.2% of Gross Domestic Product, woefully below the 2% target, which is shameful for a wealthy country such as ours.

Our soldiers in Latvia recently had to buy their own helmets and other gear, while soldiers from Denmark carried state-of-the-art Canadian-made equipment.

Trudeau speaks loudly and backs up all that bluster with a puny military. What could possibly go wrong?
 
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Ron in Regina

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Just weeks ago, government endorsed NATO pledge to hit 2 per cent spending benchmark. The Liberal government is looking to cut almost $1 billion from the annual budget of the Department of National Defence (DND) — a demand the country's top military commander says is prompting some "difficult" conversations within the military…
(??????)
 

Dixie Cup

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So who do you believe? Certainly not Trudeau cuz he can't be bothered with the "little" stuff.
 
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spaminator

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Canadian Forces worker sexually assaulted at NATO base told she should have realized such risks existed: Documents
Civilian Kristen Adams worked in the canteen operated by Canada for its troops in Latvia


Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Oct 05, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 5 minute read

A civilian worker sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier has been told she should have realized she faced such dangers when accepting a job supporting Canada’s military mission in Latvia, according to documents obtained by this newspaper.


Kristen Adams has been seeking answers from the military’s senior leadership including Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre about the attack she faced while working in the canteen operated by Canada for its troops in Latvia. Canadian military police reports and documents noted Adams was sexually assaulted when an Albanian soldier grabbed her breast during an incident on Dec. 3, 2022.

Adams, who previously worked as a National Defence contract cleaner at Garrison Petawawa, had been employed by the Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services (CFMWS), an organization that works on behalf of the defence chief to provide programs and services to military members.

The assault on Adams took place at Camp Adazi near the Latvian capital of Riga.


But in a May 10, 2023 letter, the CFMWS told Adams she should have realized she could have faced such an incident when she signed on for the job.

“As you were made aware during pre-deployment training, which occurred from 6 to 15 September 2022, there are risks involved in deploying into a theatre of operations where numerous countries work and live together and of the cultural differences that exist as a result,” wrote Ben Ouellette, vice president of CFMWS’ personnel support programs group. “In accepting to deploy, you are taking on a certain risk of working in this environment.”

Ouellette declined to be interviewed by this newspaper.

Adams said she was disgusted by the response. “Since when is sexual assault considered to be part of cultural differences or part of a job description?” she said. “He is placing the blame on me by claiming I should have known I could be sexually assaulted at my place of employment.”


Adams believes the Canadian military and the CFMWS are trying to sweep the incident under the rug. “They don’t want anything to cause embarrassment for the Latvia mission,” she said. “It’s all about protecting the mission.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced in July that as part of a major commitment to NATO, Canada would spend another $2.6 billion to double the number of troops it has stationed in Latvia. Canada currently has roughly 1,000 military personnel in that country.

The Canadian facility where the assault took place is open to NATO troops at Camp Adazi.

Adams reported the incident to Canadian military police at the camp shortly after it happened. Adams told this newspaper she was working at the canteen known as the Commons when she saw an Albanian soldier, whom she knew. The two greeted each other but then the Albanian grabbed her left breast, telling Adams, “Oh, you are very strong.”


Canadian military police told Adams that, under NATO rules, they had no jurisdiction to investigate even though the incident took place at a Canadian facility.

Latvian military police were brought in to examine the case but Adams pointed out they did not interview any witnesses. The interviews conducted were only with her and the Albanian soldier, she added.

On Dec. 14, Latvian military police decided they would not investigate further. “No details were given as to why the investigation has concluded,” Canadian military police documents noted.

However, Canadian military police did create a “shadow file” on Jan. 3, 2023 with the details of the incident. (A shadow file is a Canadian Forces document about an issue the military has an interest in but not direct control over.) Those details and that report do not dispute Adams’ version of events. “On 3 Dec 2022, the victim was working as a civilian employee when a military member from another nation touched them inappropriately and without their consent,” the shadow file report added.


Adams was told, according to the Canadian military documents, that she wasn’t allowed to see any investigative records and would have to file an Access to Information request to obtain such material. Adams filed that request and received heavily censored documents.

Shortly after the assault, Adams’ contract was ended two months early by CFMWS. That decision was made “in order to ensure there is no further risk to your health,” according to a Feb. 3 letter sent to Adams by the organization. CFMWS gave her $11,833, which paid her out for the early termination of her contract.

In response to Adams’ formal complaint to CFMWS in May, Ouellette wrote the former employee that the organization has “gone above and beyond in its efforts to support you and we encourage you to use the tools and resources at your disposal to your benefit as you work through this matter. We have addressed your concerns on numerous occasions.”


“As such, we will no longer entertain further complaints or correspondence from you regarding this issue,” Ouellette added in his May 10 response.

While Canadian Forces documents refer to Adams as a victim of a sexual assault, the various correspondence Adams received from CFMWS does not use that term. Instead, the CFMWS correspondence includes terms such as ”formal complaint about inappropriate touching”, “your situation” and “the incident”.

National Defence noted in a statement to this newspaper that Adams has received support from the CFMWS and has been referred to the Canadian Armed Forces’ Sexual Misconduct Response Centre for additional support. “CFMWS takes its responsibilities towards its employees very seriously and is working with the CAF and NATO partners to ensure any investigation is supported,” the National Defence statement noted.


The Latvian Armed Forces responded to this newspaper in an email statement, stating an investigation was conducted into the incident but added there was “no discernible wrongdoing that could be properly classified and interpreted as sexual harassment.”

An additional review was also done and it “concluded that there were no indications of a criminal offence,” according to the Latvian Armed Forces.

But a separate Latvian report obtained by Adams through the Access to Information law doesn’t dispute that the NATO soldier grabbed her breast. But it explained that “it does not follow that the mentioned actions were carried out with a certain intention or purpose, or were they followed by comments of an offensive, humiliating or sexual nature.”


However, in its response, the Latvian military also claimed mistakenly that Adams was a member of the Canadian Armed Forces.

“They never conducted a real investigation,” said Adams. “They didn’t even spell my name right in their report and they think I’m in the Canadian military. Their whole response has been a joke.”

David Pugliese is an award-winning journalist covering Canadian Forces and military issues in Canada. To support his work, including exclusive content for subscribers only, sign up here: ottawacitizen.com/subscribe
 

spaminator

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New safety training brought in after sexual assault on Canadian at NATO base in Latvia
Civilian worker Kristen Adams was sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier at Camp Adazi in December 2022


Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Oct 11, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

Civilian workers supporting Canadian troops in Latvia are being given new safety training in the aftermath of a sexual assault on one of their colleagues by a NATO soldier.


The use of a buddy system for workers who are walking around the NATO base after dark is also being emphasized after Canadian military police were told of other attacks on women at the installation near Riga.

This newspaper revealed Oct. 5 that a Canadian civilian worker had been sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier at Camp Adazi in December 2022.

But Kristen Adams was told by management of Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services (CFMWS) that she should have realized she could have faced such an incident when she signed on for the job of supporting Canadian soldiers in Latvia.

Adams has been seeking answers from the military’s senior leadership, including Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre, about the attack while she worked in a canteen operated by Canada for its troops in Latvia. Canadian military police reports and documents noted Adams was sexually assaulted when an Albanian soldier grabbed her breast on Dec. 3, 2022.


National Defence spokesperson Jessica Lamirande said training for staff of the Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services was being changed. “Pre-deployment training for CFMWS personnel has been revamped in order to include extensive information on harassment and violence prevention,” Lamirande confirmed.

CFMWS implemented the new measures for its pre-deployment training on Sept. 15, National Defence said.

This newspaper had submitted questions about the attack on Adams on Sept. 14.

Adams told Canadian military police about two other sexual assaults at Camp Adazi, according to a military police report dated March 23, 2023. During her interview with police, Adams noted those women did not report the attacks “as they believed nothing would be done and were scared to be sent home,” the Canadian report added.


In response to a request for data on sexual assaults at Camp Adazi, Lamirande said, “It is not possible to get an accurate picture of the number of sexual assault complaints due to the multi-national makeup of the battle group in Latvia.”

Sexual offences under Canadian military police jurisdiction that occur on deployed operations are included in the overall total numbers of sexual assaults in the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal annual report, she added.

Larmirande also noted that a camera installed in the canteen where Adams worked would be repositioned to ensure video coverage of the entire facility.

In addition, there will be training on “systems of oppression and culture risk factors in regions deployed to in terms of how they relate to sexual harassment and violence,” Lamirande added.


Adams, a contract worker, said the new measures were too little too late. She said Canadian women working in the canteen were often alone, particularly during early-morning opening hours.

Adams believes the Canadian military and CFMWS are trying to sweep the incident under the rug. “They don’t want anything to cause embarrassment for the Latvia mission,” she said.

In addition, the changes being brought in are still trying to explain the sexual assault in terms of cultural differences between NATO soldiers, Adams said. “Sexual assault is wrong, no matter what culture you come from.”

Adams originally reported the attack to Canadian military police at Camp Adazi shortly after it happened. But police told Adams that, under NATO rules, they had no jurisdiction to investigate even though the incident took place at a Canadian facility.


Latvian military police were brought in to investigate and concluded there was “no discernible wrongdoing that could be properly classified and interpreted as sexual harassment.”

Canadian military police, meanwhile, referred to Adams as a victim of a sexual assault in various reports.

National Defence noted in a statement to this newspaper that Adams had received support from CFMWS and had been referred to the Canadian Armed Forces’ Sexual Misconduct Response Centre for additional support.

David Pugliese is an award-winning journalist covering Canadian Forces and military issues in Canada. To support his work, including exclusive content for subscribers only, sign up here: ottawacitizen.com/subscribe
 

Dixie Cup

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New safety training brought in after sexual assault on Canadian at NATO base in Latvia
Civilian worker Kristen Adams was sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier at Camp Adazi in December 2022


Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Oct 11, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

Civilian workers supporting Canadian troops in Latvia are being given new safety training in the aftermath of a sexual assault on one of their colleagues by a NATO soldier.


The use of a buddy system for workers who are walking around the NATO base after dark is also being emphasized after Canadian military police were told of other attacks on women at the installation near Riga.

This newspaper revealed Oct. 5 that a Canadian civilian worker had been sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier at Camp Adazi in December 2022.

But Kristen Adams was told by management of Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services (CFMWS) that she should have realized she could have faced such an incident when she signed on for the job of supporting Canadian soldiers in Latvia.

Adams has been seeking answers from the military’s senior leadership, including Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre, about the attack while she worked in a canteen operated by Canada for its troops in Latvia. Canadian military police reports and documents noted Adams was sexually assaulted when an Albanian soldier grabbed her breast on Dec. 3, 2022.


National Defence spokesperson Jessica Lamirande said training for staff of the Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services was being changed. “Pre-deployment training for CFMWS personnel has been revamped in order to include extensive information on harassment and violence prevention,” Lamirande confirmed.

CFMWS implemented the new measures for its pre-deployment training on Sept. 15, National Defence said.

This newspaper had submitted questions about the attack on Adams on Sept. 14.

Adams told Canadian military police about two other sexual assaults at Camp Adazi, according to a military police report dated March 23, 2023. During her interview with police, Adams noted those women did not report the attacks “as they believed nothing would be done and were scared to be sent home,” the Canadian report added.


In response to a request for data on sexual assaults at Camp Adazi, Lamirande said, “It is not possible to get an accurate picture of the number of sexual assault complaints due to the multi-national makeup of the battle group in Latvia.”

Sexual offences under Canadian military police jurisdiction that occur on deployed operations are included in the overall total numbers of sexual assaults in the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal annual report, she added.

Larmirande also noted that a camera installed in the canteen where Adams worked would be repositioned to ensure video coverage of the entire facility.

In addition, there will be training on “systems of oppression and culture risk factors in regions deployed to in terms of how they relate to sexual harassment and violence,” Lamirande added.


Adams, a contract worker, said the new measures were too little too late. She said Canadian women working in the canteen were often alone, particularly during early-morning opening hours.

Adams believes the Canadian military and CFMWS are trying to sweep the incident under the rug. “They don’t want anything to cause embarrassment for the Latvia mission,” she said.

In addition, the changes being brought in are still trying to explain the sexual assault in terms of cultural differences between NATO soldiers, Adams said. “Sexual assault is wrong, no matter what culture you come from.”

Adams originally reported the attack to Canadian military police at Camp Adazi shortly after it happened. But police told Adams that, under NATO rules, they had no jurisdiction to investigate even though the incident took place at a Canadian facility.


Latvian military police were brought in to investigate and concluded there was “no discernible wrongdoing that could be properly classified and interpreted as sexual harassment.”

Canadian military police, meanwhile, referred to Adams as a victim of a sexual assault in various reports.

National Defence noted in a statement to this newspaper that Adams had received support from CFMWS and had been referred to the Canadian Armed Forces’ Sexual Misconduct Response Centre for additional support.

David Pugliese is an award-winning journalist covering Canadian Forces and military issues in Canada. To support his work, including exclusive content for subscribers only, sign up here: ottawacitizen.com/subscribe
In Latvia, is it likely not considered a sexual assault grabbing someone's boob? I wonder what their definition of "sexual assault" is in their legal realm so I found this on line:

Rape and sexual assault are criminal offences under Latvian law. Marital rape is not criminalised in Latvia as a separate offence. In 2004, the CEDAW Committee urged Latvia to criminalise marital rape as a separate offence, prosecute offenders and provide data on this form of domestic violence in its next periodic report. There is no specific criminal offence for intimate partner violence (IPV). IPV can only be prosecuted under a range of criminal law provisions (e.g. offences against the person). IPV is referred to as domestic violence. There is no official definition by the government neither on IPV nor domestic violence but a definition used for concrete planning documents such as the Programme for the Reduction of Domestic Violence 2008-2011 defines domestic violence as a violent offence (physical, sexual or emotional) between adult persons living together. Sexual harassment is only criminalised if it takes place in the workplace (under the labour law). Individual victims of violations of labour rights can submit complaints at the State Labour Inspectorate and Ombudsman Office.
 
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petros

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In Latvia, is it likely not considered a sexual assault grabbing someone's boob? I wonder what their definition of "sexual assault" is in their legal realm so I found this on line:

Rape and sexual assault are criminal offences under Latvian law. Marital rape is not criminalised in Latvia as a separate offence. In 2004, the CEDAW Committee urged Latvia to criminalise marital rape as a separate offence, prosecute offenders and provide data on this form of domestic violence in its next periodic report. There is no specific criminal offence for intimate partner violence (IPV). IPV can only be prosecuted under a range of criminal law provisions (e.g. offences against the person). IPV is referred to as domestic violence. There is no official definition by the government neither on IPV nor domestic violence but a definition used for concrete planning documents such as the Programme for the Reduction of Domestic Violence 2008-2011 defines domestic violence as a violent offence (physical, sexual or emotional) between adult persons living together. Sexual harassment is only criminalised if it takes place in the workplace (under the labour law). Individual victims of violations of labour rights can submit complaints at the State Labour Inspectorate and Ombudsman Office.
A NATO base is a unique beast. The answer is in the article.

"Adams originally reported the attack to Canadian military police at Camp Adazi shortly after it happened. But police told Adams that, under NATO rules, they had no jurisdiction to investigate even though the incident took place at a Canadian facility."
 

Taxslave2

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In Latvia, is it likely not considered a sexual assault grabbing someone's boob? I wonder what their definition of "sexual assault" is in their legal realm so I found this on line:

Rape and sexual assault are criminal offences under Latvian law. Marital rape is not criminalised in Latvia as a separate offence. In 2004, the CEDAW Committee urged Latvia to criminalise marital rape as a separate offence, prosecute offenders and provide data on this form of domestic violence in its next periodic report. There is no specific criminal offence for intimate partner violence (IPV). IPV can only be prosecuted under a range of criminal law provisions (e.g. offences against the person). IPV is referred to as domestic violence. There is no official definition by the government neither on IPV nor domestic violence but a definition used for concrete planning documents such as the Programme for the Reduction of Domestic Violence 2008-2011 defines domestic violence as a violent offence (physical, sexual or emotional) between adult persons living together. Sexual harassment is only criminalised if it takes place in the workplace (under the labour law). Individual victims of violations of labour rights can submit complaints at the State Labour Inspectorate and Ombudsman Office.
To be fair, it is not in turdOWE's mind either. Or at least when he does it.
 
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spaminator

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Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, acquitted on sex assault charge, settles lawsuit
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Oct 12, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 1 minute read

OTTAWA — Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin has reached an undisclosed settlement in his lawsuit over how the Canadian military and federal government responded to an allegation of sexual misconduct.


Fortin was removed as head of Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout campaign in May 2021 while he was under investigation for an allegation dating back to 1988, when he was at military college.


He was charged with one count of sexual assault in August 2021, for which he was acquitted in last December after a trial in the civilian Quebec Superior Court, and the Canadian Armed Forces also cleared him the next month.

Fortin filed a lawsuit in March against 16 high-ranking officials, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, chief of the defence staff Gen. Wayne Eyre, and the Liberal cabinet ministers who held the defence and health portfolios at the time that he was turfed from his high-profile position.

A statement of claim filed with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, which sought $6 million in damages, accused officials of negligent investigation, the inappropriate public disclosure of private facts, breach of confidence and conspiracy to cause damages.

A joint statement today from the Defence Department and the Canadian Armed Forces says the legal proceedings have been resolved and that the parties will not be commenting.
 

Taxslave2

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Sure would be nice to know how much tax money went into a payoff to keep various public officials from a news media shitstorm.
 
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spaminator

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Canadian Forces organization issues apology to staff for poor handling of sexual assault, but doesn't include victim
No one from CFMWS bothered to contact Kristen Adams, nor did anyone send her a copy of the apology


Author of the article:David Pugliese • Ottawa Citizen
Published Oct 17, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read
Kristen Adams says it's “hugely insulting they would apologize to their staff, but not say a word to me."
Kristen Adams says it's “hugely insulting they would apologize to their staff, but not say a word to me."
Management of the Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services have apologized to their employees for how they dealt with a sexual assault in Latvia, but they didn’t include the victim in that apology.


Kristen Adams, a Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services staff member, was sexually assaulted by a NATO soldier as she worked in the canteen operated by Canada for its troops in Latvia. Canadian military police reports and documents noted Adams was sexually assaulted when an Albanian soldier grabbed her breast on Dec. 3, 2022.

But, after Adams filed a formal complaint about the assault, she was told by a vice-president at Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services (CFMWS) that she should have realized she would face such dangers when accepting a job supporting Canada’s military mission in Latvia.

CFMWS management recently issued the apology to its staff for how it dealt with the assault. In the apology, they cited the “distressing” articles about the attack published in this newspaper.


But no one from CFMWS bothered to contact Adams, nor did anyone send her a copy of the apology.

“I never heard anything from them,” Adams said. “I find it hugely insulting they would apologize to their staff, but not say a word to me. The whole way they dealt with this (sexual assault) is horrendous.”

Adams has been for months seeking answers about the attack from the military’s senior leadership, including Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre. The assault on Adams occurred at Camp Adazi near the Latvian capital of Riga.

National Defence could not immediately provide an explanation why CFMWS apologized to their staff, but not to Adams.

The apology, obtained by this newspaper, stated that CFMWS took such incidents extremely seriously and acknowledged the turmoil that articles about the attack on Adams had created.


“Over the last week, many of you have shared how distressing this information was to you and how inconsistent we were with our corporate values,” managers “Ian and Robin” wrote to staff. “We are sorry.”

The email did not provide last names for Ian and Robin, but Ian Poulter, a retired major-general, is CEO of CFMWS. Robin Ross is chief human resources officer for CFMWS.

The message to CFMWS employees also acknowledged that “our letter to the employee involved in this incident was hurtful.”

“We are committed to fostering a work culture founded on compassion, dignity, and respect and ensuring a safe workplace for all our employees,” the apology noted. “We are also committed to humility, transparency and enterprise self-reflection.”


In a letter on May 10, 2023, CFMWS told Adams she should have realized she could have faced such an incident when she signed on for the job. “As you were made aware during pre-deployment training, which occurred from 6 to 15 September 2022, there are risks involved in deploying into a theatre of operations where numerous countries work and live together and of the cultural differences that exist as a result,” wrote Ben Ouellette, vice-president of CFMWS’ personnel support programs group. “In accepting to deploy, you are taking on a certain risk of working in this environment.”

Ouellette also wrote Adams that CFMWS had addressed her concerns and “we will no longer entertain further complaints or correspondence from you regarding this issue.”


Ouellette declined to be interviewed by this newspaper.

Adams said she was disgusted by the CFMWS response and its failure to properly respond to the attack. She believes the Canadian military and CFMWS are trying to sweep the incident under the rug. “They don’t want anything to cause embarrassment for the Latvia mission,” she said. “It’s all about protecting the mission.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced in July that, as part of a major commitment to NATO, Canada would spend another $2.6 billion to double the number of troops it stationed in Latvia. Canada currently has roughly 1,000 military personnel in that country.

The Canadian facility where the assault occurred is open to NATO troops at Camp Adazi.


Adams reported the incident to Canadian military police at the camp shortly after it happened.

But Canadian military police told Adams that, under NATO rules, they had no jurisdiction to investigate even though the incident took place at a Canadian facility.

Latvian military police were brought in to examine the case, but Adams pointed out they did not interview any witnesses. The only interviews conducted were with her and the Albanian soldier, she added.

On Dec. 14, Latvian military police decided they would not investigate further. Another review by Latvia concluded no criminal act had taken place.

However, Canadian military police did create a “shadow file” on Jan. 3, 2023, with details of the incident. (A shadow file is a Canadian Forces document about an issue the military has an interest in, but not direct control over.) Those details and that report do not dispute Adams’ version of events, and they termed the incident a sexual assault.


Shortly after the assault, CFMSW ended Adams’ contract two months early. That decision was made “in order to ensure there is no further risk to your health,” according to a Feb. 3 letter sent to Adams by the organization. CFMWS gave her $11,833, which paid her out for the early termination of her contract.

While Canadian Forces documents refer to Adams as a victim of a sexual assault, the various correspondence Adams received from CFMWS does not use that term. Instead, CFMWS correspondence includes terms such as ”formal complaint about inappropriate touching “and “your situation.”

In the apology to staff, the CFMWS management acknowledged the attack was a sexual assault.

David Pugliese is an award-winning journalist covering Canadian Forces and military issues in Canada. To support his work, including exclusive content for subscribers only, sign up here: ottawacitizen.com/subscribe
 

Tecumsehsbones

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But, after Adams filed a formal complaint about the assault, she was told by a vice-president at Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services (CFMWS) that she should have realized she would face such dangers when accepting a job supporting Canada’s military mission in Latvia.
How in hell did he get to be a vice-president telling the truth like that?
 

spaminator

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Dany Fortin retires from Canadian Armed Forces after reaching settlement in lawsuit
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Sarah Ritchie
Published Oct 31, 2023 • 1 minute read
Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin has retired from the Canadian Armed Forces.
Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin has retired from the Canadian Armed Forces.
OTTAWA — Dany Fortin, who recently settled a lawsuit over how the Canadian military and federal government handled an allegation of sexual misconduct, has retired from the Armed Forces.


A source close to Fortin, who spoke on the condition that they not be named because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the matter, said a small gathering to mark his departure was held at the Canadian Army Officers’ Mess in Ottawa last Friday.


A screenshot of a Facebook post about the event, shared with The Canadian Press, referred to the occasion as a “departure with dignity.”

Fortin, who had reached the rank of major-general, was removed as head of Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout campaign in May 2021 while he was under investigation for an allegation dating back to 1988, when he was at military college.

He was charged with one count of sexual assault in August 2021 and was acquitted last December after a civilian trial in Quebec Superior Court.


The Canadian Armed Forces cleared him in an internal review process the next month, but he was not reassigned to a new posting and his terms of service were up last July.

Neither Fortin nor his civil lawyer responded to requests for comment on Tuesday.

Earlier this month, Fortin settled his lawsuit against the military and top government officials for an undisclosed amount.

At the time, a joint statement from the Defence Department and the Canadian Armed Forces said the legal proceedings had been resolved and that the parties would not be commenting.

Asked Tuesday about Fortin’s retirement, the Defence Department said it had nothing to add.
 

spaminator

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Sexual misconduct survivors push for change in military as high-profile cases end
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Sarah Ritchie
Published Nov 10, 2023 • 5 minute read

OTTAWA — Remembrance Day often brings mixed emotions for Donna Riguidel, a Canadian Armed Forces veteran whose career was cut short by a sexual assault.


“You sign up believing very much that you’re coming in to serve your country and it’s a cause you believe in … and then it sort of ends with this feeling of shame and a little bit of disgrace.”


Riguidel, the founder of a consulting group called Survivor Perspectives, said this year has come with particular challenges. A number of high-profile sexual misconduct cases that sparked a major reckoning in the Armed Forces have ended in recent months.

“You’re watching these cases fall apart and there’s a very, very real human cost to all of that,” she said.

Survivors of sexual misconduct have been at the forefront of public pressure for the military to make changes.

Many of the cases that prompted heightened scrutiny on the military came to light in early 2021.


That February, former chief of the defence staff Jonathan Vance was accused of having an inappropriate relationship.

Shortly after that, Art McDonald, who had replaced Vance as chief of the defence staff in mid-January, stepped aside after he was accused of sexual misconduct.

In March 2021, Vice-Admiral Haydn Edmundson stepped down as head of military personnel command after CBC News reported that a former Armed Forces member had accused him of sexually assaulting her in 1991.

His replacement, Lt.-Gen. Steven Whelan, was later relieved of his duties after being accused of having an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate.

And the head of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, was removed from that job in May 2021 after a former military college classmate accused him of sexual assault back in 1988.


Most of the cases have since been resolved.

Vance pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in March 2022 and got a conditional discharge.

McDonald was never charged. He asked to come back as defence chief once an investigation was concluded, but he was relieved of his command in November 2021.

Fortin was acquitted last December after a trial in civilian court. He settled a lawsuit against the government and 16 high-ranking officials last month and has retired from the Armed Forces.

Whelan went before a court martial in October and the military dropped its case against him after days of legal arguments about evidence. His lawyer said he also plans to sue the government.

The only case still underway is Edmundson’s. He pleaded not guilty to indecent acts and sexual assault and is set to go to trial early in the new year.


Each time a case ended without conviction, Christine Wood said, it “landed like a punch in the gut.”

Wood is another prominent advocate who says she was sexually assaulted in 2011 while on a training course as a reservist.

“Hundreds of reports of sexual assault and sexual harassment are still being made each year. The problem has not been solved,” she said.

Some cases are not even proceeding.

CBC News reported in September that a judge stayed a sexual assault charge because it took too long to get to trial. That happened because of delays transferring the case from military to civilian court, a change that was supposed to help victims get justice.

The slew of allegations in 2021 led the government to appoint former Supreme Court justice Louise Arbour to lead an external review of the military’s culture. Her report in May 2022 made 48 recommendations to root out the problem at all levels, and the government accepted all 48.


One of them was to transfer the jurisdiction for Criminal Code sexual offences to the civilian justice system — something the government has committed to but has not made law.

On Thursday, NDP defence critic Lindsay Mathyssen tabled a private member’s bill to do just that.

Defence Minister Bill Blair has said amendments to the National Defence Act will come in one piece of government legislation. A spokesperson for his office said Thursday that he will introduce such a bill “in the coming months,” but gave no clear timeline.

“I was not impressed,” said Mathyssen.

“Those crises, the threats from within will only continue if they don’t do what is necessary, as quickly as possible.”

Jocelyne Therrien, an external monitor overseeing the implementation of the Arbour recommendations, is set to file her second report this month. In May, Therrien said there had been tangible progress but a strategic plan is needed to make sure resources are in place and ensure accountability.


Therrien’s last report also noted that a panel to review the country’s two military colleges would be operational in June.

Later in May, then-defence minister Anita Anand said in a statement marking the one-year anniversary of the Arbour report that the Military College Review Board would begin its one-year term of work “shortly.”

Arbour called for such a review after examining the culture at the colleges, which she said had “an outdated and problematic leadership model.” Her report said there was reason to question whether they should exist in their current form.

The Defence Department said in a statement Friday it will announce the board members in the coming weeks, once hiring is complete. It gave no explanation for why it’s taking so long.


Blair has said that changing the military’s culture is his top priority. Shortly after taking over the file this summer, he announced that the so-called duty to report rules would be eliminated in December, fulfilling another of Arbour’s recommendations.

“It feels like there’s a bit of stagnation. It feels like there’s pushback, there’s resistance for sure,” said Maya Eichler, an associate professor at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax whose research focuses on gender and sexual violence in the Armed Forces.

Arbour’s report was just the latest in a list of external reviews that called for such changes.

“This didn’t start in 2021,” Eichler said.

She said enacting meaningful change is an existential crisis for the military. The Armed Forces has around 16,000 vacant positions and has been trying to step up recruitment, but its traditional recruiting pool of mostly white men is shrinking.

“There’s so much focus on these kinds of scandals and the leaks, I feel like we’re not really moving forward in understanding the problem,” Eichler said.

“Sexual misconduct is a power issue, and the significance of that statement is heightened in an institution that is organized around hierarchy.”

Survivors say they’re determined to keep moving forward.

“The change is coming,” Riguidel said. “The momentum ebbs, absolutely, but we are not going away.”
 

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Rate of sexual assault in Armed Forces rising, Statistics Canada says
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Dec 05, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read
A new report from Statistics Canada shows the problem of sexual misconduct in the military is getting worse.
A new report from Statistics Canada shows the problem of sexual misconduct in the military is getting worse.
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada is reporting a significant increase in the rate of sexual assaults in the military, despite increased public and government attention on the issue.


And at a time when the Armed Forces is trying to change its culture, diversify its ranks and recruit for thousands of unfilled jobs, the data suggests the problem is worse for younger women, Indigenous people, people with disabilities and members of the LGBTQ+ community.


“These results are incompatible with (Defence Department) and CAF values and ethics,” said Lt.-Gen. Jennie Carignan, the chief of professional conduct and culture.

“It is clear that there is an urgent need for the work we are doing to evolve our organizational culture and to target sexual misconduct specifically.”

StatCan released the report Tuesday based on its 2022 survey of Armed Forces members, which examined the prevalence of sexual misconduct and sexual assault in the military workplace or outside work involving another military member.


A third of regular force members completed the voluntary survey and the results were weighted to represent the regular forces.

It found that 3.5% of Canadian Armed Forces personnel were sexually assaulted by another military member or in the military workplace, a significant increase from the 1.6% figure in the same survey in 2018 and the 1.7% reported in 2016.

Statistics Canada defines sexual assault as sexual attacks, unwanted sexual touching and sexual activity when the victim was unable to consent.



The vast majority of the assaults reported in the survey were unwanted touching and were reported as having been committed by a fellow CAF member who acted alone.


The majority of victims said they did not report the assaults to authorities, in many cases because they did not think it would make a difference.

That’s in contrast to the 2018 and 2016 reports, which found the most common reason for not reporting was that the situation was resolved informally.

Only one in five cases resulted in an official report in 2022.

The new data also show there is a link between sexual misconduct and alcohol, something the military has been grappling with for years.

A third of those who said they were a victim of sexual assault said they believed the perpetrator’s use of alcohol was a factor in the assault.

Carignan said there is typically a spike in sexual misconduct reports around December because of the large number of sanctioned and unsanctioned holiday events that feature alcohol.


She said that this year, her office is working with the chain of command on prevention efforts.

But the Armed Forces do not plan to ban drinking at its events.

“This is a one-size-fits-all solution that does not allow us to do better,” Carignan said.

Banning alcohol altogether “may create other, bigger issues in the background,” like parties at private homes, she said.

Asked whether the military has a problem with alcohol, Defence Minister Bill Blair told reporters the problem is societal.

“Where it is a factor in these cases, then steps can be taken … to limit the impact that intoxication can have,” he said.

He did not say what steps those may be.

“My message is that people should conduct themselves appropriately,” Blair said, adding that he expects military leaders will properly supervise events.


StatCan said just shy of 40% of sexual assaults were reported to be committed by a supervisor or someone of higher rank.

Lindsay Mathyssen, the NDP’s defence critic, said in a statement that the report shows the government’s efforts to tackle sexual misconuct in the military have failed.

“(CAF members) continue to face sexual violence and discrimination and face retaliation or bullying from their chain of command when coming forward,” she said.

Mathyssen called on the Liberals to pass her private member’s bill, which would remove the military’s jurisdiction over criminal sexual offences.

That change was recommended by former Supreme Court justice Louise Arbour in her May 2022 report and it is something Blair says he is committed to doing. Arbour’s report found victims cited a lack of faith in the military justice system as a barrier to reporting sexual misconduct.


Carignan said her team is working to address the lack of reporting in part by overhauling the grievance system.

“What our members are telling us is that in many cases, the way their complaint is addressed is more harmful than the incident itself,” Carignan said.

Two-thirds of military members said they witnessed or experienced sexualized behaviour, including inappropriate comments or jokes, or discrimination based on gender, gender identity or sexual orientation.

However, more than half who say they witnessed that inappropriate behaviour said they intervened — usually by talking to the perpetrator — and reporting of sexualized or discriminatory behaviour was higher in 2022 than in previous years.

Carignan said that is a positive sign.


StatCan said all 15 of the behaviours measured in the survey were more common in 2022 than in 2018 and a third of women said they experienced at least one of those behaviours. That’s twice the proportion of men who said the same.

The rate of sexual assault was higher for women (7.5%) than for men (2.8%). Women make up 16% of regular force members.

At the same time, more men said they were victims of such an assault in 2022 than in 2018 and there was a particular increase among men aged 25 to 29.

More than 60% of military members said sexual misconduct is a problem, but three-quarters of members said they think the culture has improved since they joined the Armed Forces.