Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

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AMERICAN NEWS Jul 14, 2021 10:47 PM EST

BLM comes out in support of the Cuban communist regime—'condemns the US'

Black Lives Matter issued a statement condemning the US federal government, not Cuba's communist regime, over its "inhumane treatment" of the Cuban people, as demonstrations on the island continue.
 

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N.S. police officer, wife launching complaint for 'driving while Black' stop by RCMP
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Michael Tutton
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
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HALIFAX — A Halifax police superintendent and his wife, a lawyer, said Friday they were launching a complaint alleging the RCMP stopped their vehicle and ordered the officer out at gunpoint based on racial profiling.

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The RCMP, however, issued a statement later in the day saying the couple’s car matched the description of a suspect in a shooting incident, and they said the officers “ensured a safe outcome to a very stressful situation.”


Dean Simmonds, a 20-year-veteran of the Halifax police, and Angela Simmonds, a lawyer who was acclaimed this week as the provincial Liberal candidate for Preston, say the incident of “driving while Black” occurred as they were on their way to buy groceries in their community of Preston at about 12:30 p.m. on July 4.

Angela Simmonds, reached by telephone Friday, declined further comment but said she and her husband stand by the details they provided in a news release issued by the African Nova Scotian Decade for People of African Descent Coalition.

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The coalition quotes the couple as saying that when they were stopped, one of the Mounties ordered the 45-year-old police superintendent, who was wearing plain clothes, out of the vehicle with his hands up, while the other officer pointed a carbine rifle in his direction.

It was only after several minutes, once Dean Simmonds managed to explain who he was, that the two officers told the couple there had been a report of shots fired in the area. The officers “did not explain if Dean and Angela fit a description of the alleged perpetrators,” the release says. “The experience was traumatic for the couple, who feared for their lives.”


Angela Simmonds is quoted saying the case was an example of the way Black people continue “to be subjected to inhumane treatment and are regarded as dangerous, dishonest, guilty criminals.” The release calls the incident “another brutal reminder of the broader problem of systemic racism within the RCMP, and it further erodes the trust between police and Black communities in Nova Scotia.”

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The couple say they intend to file a complaint with the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission “and want a full investigation into the incident.”

Cpl. Lisa Croteau, a spokeswoman for the RCMP, said in an email Friday that the suspect vehicle fleeing the scene was reported to be a white SUV, with an out of province licence plate and tinted windows, which she said matched the Simmonds’ vehicle.

“The high-risk traffic stop involved a vehicle that matched the suspect vehicle description, with an out of province licence plate, that was coming from the direction of the nearby community,” Croteau said.

“Halifax District Operations Officers have examined the traffic stop and the actions of our members. From the information we have gathered, the traffic stop and the tactics employed by our members were in line with RCMP policy and training. Additionally, our members ensured a safe outcome to a very stressful situation, through a professional and measured response.”

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The RCMP, she added, have received a complaint related to the traffic stop, which they “take very seriously.”

“The complaint has been provided to our professional responsibilities unit and a public complaint file has been opened for thorough investigation. Should new information come to light through this investigation, we will take any and all appropriate actions.”

Dean Simmonds says in the release he has been dedicated to addressing the mistrust between the Black community and police. “I truly believed that my core values, leadership and respect for my community, my job and fellow officers would contribute to positive changes within community policing,” he said.

Heather Fairbairn, spokesperson for Nova Scotia Justice Minister Randy Delorey, issued an email statement Friday on behalf of the minister. “The allegations are certainly concerning,” Delorey said. “I understand a complaint is being filed, so it is important that I allow that process to unfold. As this relates to an ongoing police investigation it would be inappropriate for me to comment further.”

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Improper policing of Black Nova Scotians has an extensive history, said Vanessa Fells, director of operations at the coalition. She said that for two years the coalition has been calling on the RCMP to collaborate with the group to establish an African Nova Scotian policing strategy.

“We have had absolutely no traction with it,” she said. “They seem not interested. We need to stop what is currently happening and what has been happening for decades and generations. It causes trauma to our community.”

The RCMP, which polices the suburbs of Halifax, was part of a study by criminologist Scot Wortley released in March 2019 that condemned the practice of street checks as creating a “disproportionate and negative” impact on the Black community. The study found Black citizens in the Halifax region were five times more likely to be street-checked than white citizens. Street checks are the police practice of randomly stopping people, collecting personal information and storing it.

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On Nov. 29, 2019, Halifax police Chief Dan Kinsella issued an apology before several hundred members of the Black community, but the RCMP has yet to issue a similar apology on the street checks issue. Kinsella said in a release Friday that the superintendent had the right to pursue a complaint as a private citizen, adding that it would be inappropriate for him to comment further.

The phrase “driving while Black” became well known in the province after a 2003 decision of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission in the case of boxer Kirk Johnson, who was repeatedly pulled over by police and once had his car seized. Johnson was pursued and his car was towed after the officer wasn’t satisfied by the documents offered. A board of inquiry ruled in 2003 that Johnson’s treatment was a violation of his human rights.
 

Dixie Cup

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I'm offended that someone would think the RCMP would be racist. Can I have my $10million now?
N.S. police officer, wife launching complaint for 'driving while Black' stop by RCMP
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Michael Tutton
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
85457158-0715_pg_rcmp_report.PG-W.jpg
SunMedia
Article content
HALIFAX — A Halifax police superintendent and his wife, a lawyer, said Friday they were launching a complaint alleging the RCMP stopped their vehicle and ordered the officer out at gunpoint based on racial profiling.

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STORY CONTINUES BELOW

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The RCMP, however, issued a statement later in the day saying the couple’s car matched the description of a suspect in a shooting incident, and they said the officers “ensured a safe outcome to a very stressful situation.”


Dean Simmonds, a 20-year-veteran of the Halifax police, and Angela Simmonds, a lawyer who was acclaimed this week as the provincial Liberal candidate for Preston, say the incident of “driving while Black” occurred as they were on their way to buy groceries in their community of Preston at about 12:30 p.m. on July 4.

Angela Simmonds, reached by telephone Friday, declined further comment but said she and her husband stand by the details they provided in a news release issued by the African Nova Scotian Decade for People of African Descent Coalition.

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The coalition quotes the couple as saying that when they were stopped, one of the Mounties ordered the 45-year-old police superintendent, who was wearing plain clothes, out of the vehicle with his hands up, while the other officer pointed a carbine rifle in his direction.

It was only after several minutes, once Dean Simmonds managed to explain who he was, that the two officers told the couple there had been a report of shots fired in the area. The officers “did not explain if Dean and Angela fit a description of the alleged perpetrators,” the release says. “The experience was traumatic for the couple, who feared for their lives.”


Angela Simmonds is quoted saying the case was an example of the way Black people continue “to be subjected to inhumane treatment and are regarded as dangerous, dishonest, guilty criminals.” The release calls the incident “another brutal reminder of the broader problem of systemic racism within the RCMP, and it further erodes the trust between police and Black communities in Nova Scotia.”

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The couple say they intend to file a complaint with the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission “and want a full investigation into the incident.”

Cpl. Lisa Croteau, a spokeswoman for the RCMP, said in an email Friday that the suspect vehicle fleeing the scene was reported to be a white SUV, with an out of province licence plate and tinted windows, which she said matched the Simmonds’ vehicle.

“The high-risk traffic stop involved a vehicle that matched the suspect vehicle description, with an out of province licence plate, that was coming from the direction of the nearby community,” Croteau said.

“Halifax District Operations Officers have examined the traffic stop and the actions of our members. From the information we have gathered, the traffic stop and the tactics employed by our members were in line with RCMP policy and training. Additionally, our members ensured a safe outcome to a very stressful situation, through a professional and measured response.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The RCMP, she added, have received a complaint related to the traffic stop, which they “take very seriously.”

“The complaint has been provided to our professional responsibilities unit and a public complaint file has been opened for thorough investigation. Should new information come to light through this investigation, we will take any and all appropriate actions.”

Dean Simmonds says in the release he has been dedicated to addressing the mistrust between the Black community and police. “I truly believed that my core values, leadership and respect for my community, my job and fellow officers would contribute to positive changes within community policing,” he said.

Heather Fairbairn, spokesperson for Nova Scotia Justice Minister Randy Delorey, issued an email statement Friday on behalf of the minister. “The allegations are certainly concerning,” Delorey said. “I understand a complaint is being filed, so it is important that I allow that process to unfold. As this relates to an ongoing police investigation it would be inappropriate for me to comment further.”

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Improper policing of Black Nova Scotians has an extensive history, said Vanessa Fells, director of operations at the coalition. She said that for two years the coalition has been calling on the RCMP to collaborate with the group to establish an African Nova Scotian policing strategy.

“We have had absolutely no traction with it,” she said. “They seem not interested. We need to stop what is currently happening and what has been happening for decades and generations. It causes trauma to our community.”

The RCMP, which polices the suburbs of Halifax, was part of a study by criminologist Scot Wortley released in March 2019 that condemned the practice of street checks as creating a “disproportionate and negative” impact on the Black community. The study found Black citizens in the Halifax region were five times more likely to be street-checked than white citizens. Street checks are the police practice of randomly stopping people, collecting personal information and storing it.

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On Nov. 29, 2019, Halifax police Chief Dan Kinsella issued an apology before several hundred members of the Black community, but the RCMP has yet to issue a similar apology on the street checks issue. Kinsella said in a release Friday that the superintendent had the right to pursue a complaint as a private citizen, adding that it would be inappropriate for him to comment further.

The phrase “driving while Black” became well known in the province after a 2003 decision of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission in the case of boxer Kirk Johnson, who was repeatedly pulled over by police and once had his car seized. Johnson was pursued and his car was towed after the officer wasn’t satisfied by the documents offered. A board of inquiry ruled in 2003 that Johnson’s treatment was a violation of his human rights.
The cops could have been explained that the CAR they were driving was the same one as was used in whatever criminal act that allegedly had taken place. If that's what happened, then where was the communication??

Police have to be better than that and at the very least, when discovering that this wasn't who they were looking for, explain why this couple was stopped and apologize accordingly. Good grief! Are we really that out of touch? That would apply to anyone stopped, no matter what race. I wonder if the cops knew before they stopped "the car" that the people were black or is that just a supposition that's being made?

I'd like to hear both sides of the story rather than the sensational headline that they were stopped for "being Black" because more and more I'm thinking it's all B.S. and that wasn't the case at all. But that's just me. I'm becoming more and more skeptical of most headlines because they tend not to be true and I still have faith in most policing agencies (the FBI is an exception).
 

Jinentonix

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The cops could have been explained that the CAR they were driving was the same one as was used in whatever criminal act that allegedly had taken place. If that's what happened, then where was the communication??
Meh, happened to me and a couple of buddies years ago. Only there were at least a half dozen cops around the van with guns drawn. They were looking for 3 white dudes in a blue Chevy window van. We were 3 White dudes in a blue Chevy Window van. Wasn't the last time I had a firearm pointed at me either. But, because I'm White I can't scream "racism" so no one cares. Just like others who have gone through something similar.

Shit happens. It's called life. If what happened to the cop-lawyer couple is a one-off for them, they need to shut da fuq up. If they've been pulled over in the past as well for non Highway Act violation reasons then yeah. they might have a legit beef.
 

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Jul 17 - Israeli spyware firm linked to fake BLM and Amnesty websites – report



An Israeli company that sells spyware to governments is linked to fake Black Lives Matter and Amnesty International websites that are used to hack targets, according to a new report.

Researchers from the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, who worked with Microsoft, issued a report on Thursday about the potential targets of Candiru, a Tel Aviv-based firm marketing “untraceable” spyware that can infect and monitor computers and phones.

One way the company’s spyware allegedly infects targets is through web domains, and the researchers found that the firm’s software was a*sociated with URLs masquerading as NGOs, women’s rights advocates, activist groups, health organizations and news media. Citizen Lab’s research uncovered websites tied to Candiru with domain names such as “Amnesty Reports”, “Refugee International”, “Woman Studies”, “Euro News” and “CNN 24-7”.

The researchers have not identified specific targets of the websites impersonating human rights groups, and have not confirmed the involvement of any specific government clients. Microsoft said it appeared that Candiru sells the spyware that enables the hacks, and that the governments generally choose who to target and run the operations themselves.

The findings suggest that a secretive and little-known company with a wide global reach could be helping governments hack and monitor people in civil society. The report comes amid growing concerns about surveillance technologies that can aid human rights abuses and law enforcement monitoring and crackdowns on Black Lives Matter and related activist groups.
 
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spaminator

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Court upholds 9-month sentence for cop who assaulted Defonte Miller
Author of the article:Kevin Connor
Publishing date:Jul 19, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 1 minute read • 5 Comments
Toronto Police Const. Michael Theriault (left) and his brother Christian Theriault.
Toronto Police Const. Michael Theriault (left) and his brother Christian Theriault. PHOTO BY KEVIN CONNOR /TORONTO SUN FILES
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The Ontario Court of Appeal upheld a nine-month sentence meted out to a Toronto Police officer who beat a Whitby man, blinding him in one eye.

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Suspended Const. Michael Theriault will serve a nine-month sentence for an assault conviction stemming from a Dec. 28, 2016 attack on Defonte Miller, who was 19 at the time.


Theriault, who was off-duty, and his brother, Christian Theriault, were smoking in their parents’ garage in Whitby when they heard a noise and discovered teenagers trying to steal items from their parents’ truck, Theriault’s trial heard.

When the brothers left the garage, the teens fled in different directions. The brothers pursued and caught up with Miller.

Dafonte Miller leaves the Oshawa Courthouse on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019.
Dafonte Miller leaves the Oshawa Courthouse on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. PHOTO BY CRAIG ROBERTSON /Toronto Sun
There was a violent altercation, court heard, in which Miller, a Black man, sustained serious injuries, resulting in him losing sight in his left eye.


“The existence of anti-Black racism in Canadian society is beyond reasonable dispute and is properly the subject matter of judicial notice. It is well recognized that criminal justice institutions do not treat racialized groups equally,” the judge said in the appeal.

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Michael Theriault arrive sat the Durham Region Courthouse in Oshawa on November 6, 2019.
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Dafonte Miller speaks at a press conference after the verdict was handed down to the Theriault brothers in Durham region on Friday June 26, 2020.
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Michael Theriault, centre, and Christian Theriault, left, arrive at the Durham Region Courthouse in Oshawa on November 6, 2019.
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Miller’s lawyer, Julian Falconer said the dismissed appeal was an important beginning for justice for Miller, adding the case shows anti-black racism in policing is real.

In a televised interview on Monday, Miller said “this is a big step. I’m grateful.”
 

spaminator

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Black public servant files complaint over supervisor's alleged 'slaves' comment
"We should go back to the good old days when we had slaves," Monica Agard says her Immigration and Refugee Board supervisor said

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Maan Alhmidi
Publishing date:Jul 19, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 5 minute read • 58 Comments
Monica Agard is photographed in Toronto on Thursday, July 15, 2021. Agard, an employee at the Immigration and Refugee Board, says she faced racist comments from her supervisor.
Monica Agard is photographed in Toronto on Thursday, July 15, 2021. Agard, an employee at the Immigration and Refugee Board, says she faced racist comments from her supervisor. PHOTO BY CHRIS YOUNG /THE CANADIAN PRESS
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OTTAWA — Monica Agard says she was chatting with a colleague about her workload and looming deadlines when a supervisor passing by cut into their conversation.

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“We should go back to the good old days when we had slaves,” Agard, a Black woman who works at the Immigration and Refugee Board, recalled in an interview.


“I said to him, ‘Stop. Please stop, because I will file a grievance against you.’ And he said, ‘Your people are not the only people who were slaves.’ No apology, no remorse, nothing, and then he just walked away,” she said. “I was left then with all the emotional distress of this person — supervisor — making such a comment to me, and I thought it was highly inappropriate.”

Agard, who has worked at the Immigration and Refugee Board in Toronto since 1990, said she did not file a complaint against the supervisor immediately after she said he made the remark in November 2019. She said she was not satisfied with the way a previous verbal complaint on a separate issue had been handled several years earlier, when she was told it would not be pursued further.

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Then in July 2020 she learned she was being assigned to work under that same supervisor. She sent an email to the registrar, who is at the manager level, to share his alleged remarks about slaves and asked to be reassigned to another supervisor.

“This is a health issue for me,” she wrote in the email.

The email exchange was provided to The Canadian Press. It shows the registrar telling Agard to speak to her direct manager about her concerns, with Agard replying to say she did not feel comfortable doing so because she believed he was close with the supervisor in question.

She said in the interview that she felt the registrar was at first “a bit dismissive” of her request to be reassigned at first. She was eventually switched to another supervisor after she explained could not work with the other one because of the emotional stress she felt about him.

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Agard said in March this year, the registrar told her during a virtual meeting there had not yet been any communication with the supervisor about the issue. Agard filed a formal complaint of workplace harassment in late April, in which she described the alleged comment as “racist and hateful” and accused the registrar of failing to acknowledge it as a health and safety issue.

“I felt silenced, angry, depressed and disappointed but I said nothing because I understand the system now,” Agard wrote in the complaint.


Agard said she has not spoken with the supervisor about the matter and is not aware of any response from him. She said last month, she was asked by the registrar if she wanted an apology from the supervisor, or a mediation meeting.

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“I don’t think you can mediate racism, so I said ‘No.’ I don’t want to mediate this. This needs for the registrar to take very strong action against the supervisor and not to mediate,” she said.

“My heart was just racing. My head hurts. I feel as if I’m suffocating because I am trying to understand why no one is taking any action on a situation like this,” she said.

The supervisor did not respond to a direct request for comment in time for publication.

Line-Alice Guibert-Wolff, a spokeswoman for the Immigration and Refugee Board, said in a statement that the administrative tribunal is aware of the allegations against the supervisor and “is already engaged in acting on them.” She said she could not discuss specifics because the case is “under active review, and to protect the integrity of the process.”

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She said the IRB “takes allegations of this nature very seriously. Racism, and discrimination in any form, are unacceptable and fundamentally incompatible with the IRB’s core values.”

Guibert-Wolff also said the IRB set up a new ombudsperson office, brought in mandatory training and is developing a diversity and inclusion strategy.


Nicholas Marcus Thompson, among a group of current and former Black federal workers who filed a proposed class-action lawsuit in Federal Court against the government in December, said Black employees are facing “racial trauma” as a result of the discrimination in the public service.

The plaintiffs are alleging systemic discrimination in how the federal government has hired and promoted thousands of public servants for nearly half a century. None of the allegations has been tested in court and the lawsuit has not been certified.

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The group is set to share a video of Agard telling her story on Monday as part of efforts to raise awareness about the legal action.

Earlier this month, the legal team filed a motion in Federal Court demanding the government to immediately create a $100-million mental health fund to address the issues they say Black public service workers live with in the public service.

The fund aims to provide culturally sensitive mental health support for Black public service employees who live with the consequences of racism and discrimination at their workplaces, according to the motion.

Thompson said existing support programs do not address the unique needs of Black employees, adding that many of the mental health professionals that public servants have access to “do not even know what racial trauma is or how to treat it in the first place.”

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Treasury Board spokesperson Martin Potvin said the government is committed to “fostering a healthy, supportive, and respectful workplace.” He listed some recent steps the government has taken to tackle systemic discrimination in the federal workforce, including amendments to the Public Service Employment Act aimed at removing barriers to hiring and promotions.

He also said the federal government provided the plaintiffs’ lawyers with a list of mental health resources that are available to current and former public servants, including an employee assistance program, a health benefits plan that provides up to $2,000 in mental health services per year and other resources.

“We are studying the motion and are hopeful that the concerns raised may be resolved through further discussions with the plaintiffs,” he wrote.
 
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Jinentonix

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“I said to him, ‘Stop. Please stop, because I will file a grievance against you.’ And he said, ‘Your people are not the only people who were slaves.’ No apology, no remorse, nothing, and then he just walked away,” she said. “I was left then with all the emotional distress of this person — supervisor — making such a comment to me, and I thought it was highly inappropriate.”

Your hurt feelings do not mean what he said isn't factually correct. I wonder, if someone in the Office who was Irish took offense because his or her ancestors showed up to the Americas as slaves could file a grievance. My father was an orphan in 1920-30's Britain. You know what that meant? He was basically a child slave. Who do I get to sue?
 

spaminator

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Proud Boys leader pleads guilty to weapons charge, destroying BLM flag
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Jul 19, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • 6 Comments
Enrique Tarrio, leader of The Proud Boys, holds a U.S. flag during a protest showing support for Cubans demonstrating against their government, in Miami, Florida on July 16, 2021.
Enrique Tarrio, leader of The Proud Boys, holds a U.S. flag during a protest showing support for Cubans demonstrating against their government, in Miami, Florida on July 16, 2021. PHOTO BY EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI /AFP via Getty Images
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Enrique Tarrio, a leader of the right-wing extremist group the Proud Boys, pleaded guilty on Monday to burning a Black Lives Matter flag and possessing a large-capacity ammunition feeding device, federal prosecutors said.

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Tarrio, 37, faces a maximum sentence of 180 days in jail for each of the two counts against him and a $1,000 fine when he is sentenced in April.

Megyn Kelly slams Naomi Osaka over Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue cover

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He was arrested in January when he arrived in Washington two days before the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Tarrio was charged with possessing two high-capacity rifle magazines, and burning the Black Lives Matter banner during a demonstration weeks earlier by supporters of then-President Donald Trump.

Following his arrest, a federal judge ordered him to leave the city pending a court date in June.

Tarrio did not take part in the deadly U.S. Capitol riot. The FBI has said his earlier arrest was an effort to pre-empt the events of Jan. 6, where several other members of the Proud Boys were taken into custody.


Tarrio has led the Proud Boys in confrontations with antifa, an amorphous and often violent leftist movement.

Reuters has reported that he worked extensively as an informant for federal and local law enforcement following a 2012 arrest. Tarrio denied working undercover or cooperating in cases against others.