April Fools!! Here's your Carbon Tax F#ckers!!!

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,785
1,190
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Moe tweeted out Tuesday that “Saskatchewan needs to be a nation within a nation” and that the province needs to stand up for itself when the federal government implements detrimental policies.
“We’re going to have to make every effort to determine our own destiny,” Scott Moe told Joyce Napier on CTV’s Power Play Tuesday. “What we see coming from the federal government is not consultation.”

This sounds familiar…like I’ve heard it somewhere before….
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
22,077
3,180
113
B.C.
:
Moe tweeted out Tuesday that “Saskatchewan needs to be a nation within a nation” and that the province needs to stand up for itself when the federal government implements detrimental policies.
“We’re going to have to make every effort to determine our own destiny,” Scott Moe told Joyce Napier on CTV’s Power Play Tuesday. “What we see coming from the federal government is not consultation.”

This sounds familiar…like I’ve heard it somewhere before….
Words only count if they are followed by action , and I for one would love to see this fleeting action .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,785
1,190
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Stephen Harper is criticizing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s climate-change policy for unfairly singling out “certain parts of the country,” as the Liberal government proceeds with a hard cap on oil-and-gas emissions that are expected to particularly affect provinces such as Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Mr. Harper said if he were in charge of mitigating climate change in Canada in 2021, he would not be taking measures to “shut down” an industry in a region that didn’t generate political returns for him.

The former Conservative Leader used a hypothetical analogy to make his point, speaking about the aerospace industry in Montreal, where the Conservatives performed relatively poorly during elections when he headed the party.

“If I were today handling the climate-change issue, I wouldn’t be saying to myself, ‘You know, I have had three national elections, three governments [and] never won a seat in Montreal,’ ” he told the Canada West Foundation (CWF) event.

“ ‘And one of the biggest growth of global emissions is the aerospace industry,’ ” he continued. “ ‘Therefore, I am going to shut down Montreal’s aerospace industry because I don’t need to care about it because I don’t have any political interests there.’ ”

Mr. Trudeau’s Liberal Party, which won 35 seats in Quebec in the September, 2021, federal election, only secured two in Alberta and was shut out of Saskatchewan.

Mr. Harper said that in his opinion, the federal government under his tenure treated all regions fairly “whether they voted for us or not.”

He said that is not happening today under Ottawa’s climate-change policy.

“Obviously, the way some things are being handled today – where certain parts of the country are singled out in ways that others aren’t – I think is really inexcusable.”

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney later called it “peculiar” that Mr. Trudeau hadn’t discussed the issue with the province before the Prime Minister spoke at COP26. “We need to be partners in this,” Mr. Kenney said.
Separately, Mr. Harper also criticized judicial activism in Canada as a driver of litigation and uncertainty, citing the Supreme Court’s recent decision that Ottawa has the authority to impose a minimum price on greenhouse-gas emissions across the country.

“I think the increasingly wide discretion used by courts in rendering judgments – whether it’s on the Charter, division of powers, or anything else, simply provides more uncertainty over the long term and more invitation to future litigation.”
He said he thought the Supreme Court’s March, 2021, majority decision on the carbon tax reference “was devoid of solid legal reasoning,” arguing that “if you can get the Constitution so radically interpreted differently than what it actually says on an issue like that, then you are going to invite all kinds of other challenges.”
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
3,706
1,480
113
Edmonton
Moe tweeted out Tuesday that “Saskatchewan needs to be a nation within a nation” and that the province needs to stand up for itself when the federal government implements detrimental policies.
“We’re going to have to make every effort to determine our own destiny,” Scott Moe told Joyce Napier on CTV’s Power Play Tuesday. “What we see coming from the federal government is not consultation.”

This sounds familiar…like I’ve heard it somewhere before….
Hey, that's a good idea. Both SK & AB can declare themselves a "nation" and should have access to exactly the same as Quebec - which means getting some of our money back. Think it'll work? LOL
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,785
1,190
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Money back or not…it’s the only way to be recognized in Ottawa as shown by Quebec. The “West Wants In” tactic didn’t work and was part of the gradual path leading to today’s situation.

Voting against the party out to hamstring them isn’t effective and only leads to being COP26’d, so what else is there to do?

It doesn’t seem like the Automotive or Aerospace Industries are being similarly punished by the Trudeau regime, does it?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,785
1,190
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Moe wants more powers for his province over immigration, policing, taxation, responsible firearms policy and international relations. All powers Quebec currently exercises, in fact, Ontario also exercises many of them.
CBC attempted to dismiss this push for a deal similar to Quebec’s as ill-timed due to Saskatchewan’s COVID efforts, a distraction from Moe’s failures if you will. Quebec was the disaster zone of Canada in the first wave of COVID-19, its death rate per 100,000 is nearly double Saskatchewan’s, but you wouldn’t hear the argument that Quebec shouldn’t have the powers they do.

Globe and Mail columnist Gary Mason may be based in Vancouver but he writes for the voice of the Toronto establishment, and his column was suitably dismissive of Moe, as was the Globe’s Andrew Coyne. Canada’s establishment doesn’t like when one of these prairie upstarts asks to be treated fairly.

It’s the same reaction when Alberta makes similar demands or when the famous Firewall Letter is used as shorthand to denigrate a Western politician or the ideas they are putting forward. I mean, imagine allowing a province to have a provincial police service instead of using the RCMP. Sure, Ontario and Quebec have that, but they are different, special.

And who could support provinces collecting more of their own tax revenue? Well, other than every party recognized in the House of Commons right now – they all support giving Quebec more taxation powers, it was an issue in the last election.

Canada is supposed to be a federation of provinces coming together to allow the federal government to handle things that they are best suited too. People in Eastern Canada though tend to view the prairies as if they are still territories, not equal partners – it’s like the kid brother you won’t let grow up.

It’s a viewpoint that is quite prevalent in the current federal government and it shows up in their policies and attitudes towards the West.

So instead of dismissing people like Premier Moe when they speak up about their frustrations, our establishment pundits and our elected leaders could try to understand where the frustration is coming from. Instead, they downplay any concerns raised West of the Ontario border while jumping to assure Quebec at every turn.

“In light of the federal government’s continued attacks on our economy, in particular our energy sector, our government needs to assert and protect Saskatchewan’s economic sovereignty,” Moe told me via email Thursday.

“This would not be necessary if we could count on our federal government to advance Saskatchewan’s economic interests. But we can’t.”

“We’re really starting to feel the differences between Saskatchewan and where our federal government is heading, is we’re actually, at this point in time … more like a nation within Canada,” Moe said.

He was discussing the moves by the Trudeau government at the COP26 summit in Glasgow to unilaterally announce hard caps on greenhouse gas emissions without consultation, but his frustration with Ottawa is wider than just that issue. And his frustration is not new for those who have been paying attention.