Trump attacks Canada's dairy supply


B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#1
Canadian envoy fires back at Trump over dairy remarks



OTTAWA -- Canada's envoy to Washington has shot back at criticism by President Donald Trump and U.S. milk producers, saying the facts don't support a charge that the Canadian dairy industry is to blame for the woes of some American farmers.

"Canada does not accept the contention that Canada's dairy policies are the cause of financial loss for dairy farmers in the United States," Ambassador David MacNaughton said in a letter to the governors of Wisconsin and New York that was released Tuesday night in rebuttal to Trump's surprise criticism of Canada earlier in the day.

"The facts do not bear this out."

The U.S. president's surprise decision to call out Canada by name Tuesday put dairy farmers north of the border on notice that they are in America's fair-trade sights.
Trump launched his broadside after a brewing trade spat that has seen the U.S. dairy lobby accuse Canada of "systemic disregard" of its trade obligations, while the Canadian industry accused its American rival of "scapegoating."

Trump also signalled he wants to do more than simply tweak the North American Free Trade Agreement, saying he is looking for "very big changes" to the trilateral pact that includes Mexico, or else he will scrap it once and for all.

Trump levelled the threats -- some of his strongest-ever anti-Canadian rhetoric -- during an event at a Wisconsin factory where he unveiled his "Buy American-Hire American" executive order.

After what has been a relatively warm beginning in relations with Canada, which included what was seen by many as a positive trip to Washington by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Trump dropped the gloves on Canada's well-guarded dairy sector.

He appeared to be taking dead aim at the industry, its coveted supply-management system long a sacred political cow in Canada, during an appearance in Wisconsin, a state he took from the Democrats with his "America First" anti-trade message.

It is also a state that is feeling the effects of Canada's decision to impose import taxes on ultra-filtered milk, a protein liquid concentrate used to make cheese. It had been duty-free but Canada changed course after its milk producers complained.

A spokeswoman for Canada's dairy industry said Tuesday night there has not been any new taxes on dairy imports.

About 70 dairy producers in both Wisconsin and New York are affected by the decision. Trump promised to work with Wisconsin's congressional delegation to get a solution after the governors of Wisconsin and New York urged him to take action.

Last week, Trump received a letter from four U.S. dairy industry groups -- the National Milk Producers Federation, the U.S. Dairy Export Council, the International Dairy Foods Association and the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture -- that accused Canada of violating its trade commitments to the U.S.

"Time and again Canada has demonstrated its disregard of its dairy commitments to the United States -- hampering America's exports to Canada -- while pursuing ways to use its government-controlled system to unfairly dump greater Canadian exports in global markets."

The Dairy Farmers of Canada, which has previously denounced the complaints as "falsehoods and half-truths," said Tuesday it was confident the federal government would continue to defend the dairy industry.

MacNaughton backed the organization's position that Canada has done nothing to block U.S. imports, and that the predicament is the result of an "over-saturated" market that has led to lower prices.

MacNaughton attached a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture that he said "indicates that poor results in the U.S. sector are due to U.S. and global overproduction. As made clear in the report, Canada is not a contributor to the overproduction problem."

He said the trade balance on dairy "massively" favours the U.S. by a five-to-one margin.

MacNaughton called Canada-U.S. relations a "model" for the world, "but it is important that we work together to grow middle-class jobs and not lay blame where is does not belong."

Trump, however, blamed Canada for "some very unfair things have happened to our dairy farmers and others and we're going to start working on that."

Standing up for dairy farmers in Wisconsin "demands fair trade with all of our trading partners," Trump said, "and that includes Canada."

The work would start immediately, he added.

"When it comes to wasteful destructive job killing regulations, we are going to use a tool you know very well -- it's called the sledgehammer," he said.

"We're going to get together and we're going to call Canada, and we're going to say, 'What happened?' And they might give us an answer, but we're going to get the solution and not just the answer, because we know what the solution is."

Trump also criticized the U.S. trading regime, which calls for a waiting period, and consultations that can stretch to three months or beyond. He suggested it has stalled his attempt to renegotiate NAFTA.

"The whole thing is ridiculous. NAFTA has been very, very bad for our country," Trump said. "It's been very, very bad for our companies and our workers, and we're going to make some very big changes or we are going to get rid of NAFTA for once and for all."

Francois Dumontier, a spokesman for Les Producteurs de lait du Quebec, said imports of U.S. milk products have increased since 1993 and now account for three-quarters of milk products in Canada.

"So the Americans are not suffering from the current terms of NAFTA and existing trade agreements."

www.ctvnews.ca/business/canad...arks-1.3373563 (external - login to view)

 
Johnnny
No Party Affiliation
+1
#2
I dont drink milk. Havent had a glass in almost 10+ years.... Yes i still eat cheese though which some would say is just as bad.

Anyways trump...

Our milk is way better anyways because we have a food agency that hasnt seen its funding slashed like hell over the years..

Knock on wood so Trudeau doesnt change that...
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
+3
#3  Top Rated Post
More of the Dumpster's grandstanding over a nonexistent problem. Canada actually imports more in the way of dairy products than it exports and most of those imports come from the USA.

 
bill barilko
+2
#4
I love all dairy products but never eat anything from the USA-too much crap used in their system.
 
Johnnny
No Party Affiliation
+2
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

I love all dairy products but never eat anything from the USA-too much crap used in their system.

Oaxaca Cheese is the best cheese in the world... In my opinion
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
+1
#6
American cows are pumped full of growth hormones - Mutant juice!
 
tay
#7
I was listening to the Director of the Dairy Board and as he explains the situation the Americans are bigly bsing on the issue.

And as surprising as this may seem, it was suggested that Trump is saying something that has no basis in reality to just get attention........





On the link go to the next page and look for the title of the article and listen.........

Wednesday, April 19th 2017

Dairy Farmers of Ontario React To Trump Claims

Larry speaks with their General Counsel.

The Larry Fedoruk Show (external - login to view)
 
Tecumsehsbones
#8
How many people were killed in the attack? And how many cows?
 
MHz
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

I love all dairy products but never eat anything from the USA-too much crap used in their system.

Which of you is getting the GMO stuff, you or the chihuahua?
 
Murphy
Conservative
#10
Reports are still coming in.

 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#11
I think we've always known he can be a little outspoken, so I doubt if it's a huge surprise!
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
#12
Glad someone is attacking our expensive farmer racket. Supply management is a scam that artificially keeps prices high to ensure the chosen ones make a very good living.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#13
Remember the Crow Rate?
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#14
C'mon up for a fishing trip Donny.... He have a Yuuuge lake here. It's very deep. Very deep. It's very cold too. Very cold. It's gonna be great - for the world
 
mentalfloss
+1
#15
The US hired a used car salesman.
 
petros
#16
And you are a used car buyer.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#17
 
Twila
+3
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Glad someone is attacking our expensive farmer racket. Supply management is a scam that artificially keeps prices high to ensure the chosen ones make a very good living.

really, how dare farmers be allowed to make a good living. How dare Canada ensure it's farmers continue to farm.
 
petros
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Last edited by petros; 2 days ago at 02:43 PM..
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Glad someone is attacking our expensive farmer racket. Supply management is a scam that artificially keeps prices high to ensure the chosen ones make a very good living.

Not happening here in Ontario where Wynne's thievery and BS is making farming a losers' bet ... while she gives free electricity to Tumperica. I hope his twisted NAFTA mouth gets filled with a huge power bill
 
petros
#21
He is right. Canada needs to blow to Quota System. As consumers we are getting screwed.
 
tay
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Glad someone is attacking our expensive farmer racket. Supply management is a scam that artificially keeps prices high to ensure the chosen ones make a very good living.

Listen to the short interview I posted. I know it's ihate radio so they have made it cumbersome to post the link directly.....

Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

He is right. Canada needs to blow to Quota System. As consumers we are getting screwed.

Only Denmark and Canada have a quota system.


Only Denmark and Canada do not have independent dairy farmers going broke.


Lest we forget, Trump is speaking for the Corporate dairy farmers..........




Since 1970, the number of American dairy farms has dropped by more than 90 percent, from 640,000 to under 60,000 today. In an industry dominated by corporate interests, family farms are constantly at risk of going under. In addition to an unfair and often volatile pricing system, recent drought conditions and rising feed costs have tightened the financial squeeze on dairy farmers, leaving the future of their farms uncertain. If we want fresh, healthy, local dairy products, we need our dairy farmers to stay in business.

Between 1998 and 2007, dairy farmers saw their share of the retail milk price drop 25 percent, even while retail prices increased by 40 percent. While farmers were paid less and consumers paid more, corporate processors walked away with windfall profits. Milk prices have risen from their lowest point in 2009, but even with increased prices dairy farmers are still struggling to cover their production costs.

Recent years have exacerbated the dire situation for America’s dairy farms. In 2009, the milk market tanked, with prices plummeting and droves of family dairy farms closing their doors. While milk prices recovered somewhat in 2010 and 2011, it was not enough to recover the previous year’s losses. Prices dipped again in 2012 just as persistent drought—the worst seen in the U.S. since the 1950s—and skyrocketing feed costs plagued dairy farmers. In the worst months of 2012, dairy farmers were losing up to $8.65 per hundredweight of milk they produced putting their farms in jeopardy and dramatically impacting rural economies.

https://www.farmaid.org/blog/dairy-family-farmers-in-crisis/ (external - login to view)
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#23
 
tay
#24
Fear on the farm; Who will keep the milk flowing if U.S. president carries out his deportation threats?


The workers yell out to each other in Spanish above the noise. There's little downtime in their 14-hour day.

They are all from Mexico and are in the United States illegally. Some entered the country on temporary visas, but those have expired. Now they fear immigration enforcement officers are closing in.

According to a 2015 study by Texas A&M University for the National Milk Producers Federation, immigrant labour makes up 51 per cent of the dairy industry's workforce. Removing those workers, the report says, would lead to milk prices increasing 90 per cent and cost the U.S. economy more than $32 billion.

Fear on the farm: In Vermont, migrant dairy workers and their bosses worry about Trump - World - CBC News
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

He is right. Canada needs to blow to Quota System. As consumers we are getting screwed.

Poor you.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

He is right. Canada needs to blow to Quota System. As consumers we are getting screwed.


We'll do that right along with cuts to oil company subsidies.
 
tay
#27
It’s curious to this observer that the fair treatment of American dairy farmers somehow starts in Canada. Maybe the temptation to initiate a trade war with one of our neighbors and strongest trade partners is so deep-seated, that he and his advisors couldn’t resist jumping into the milking parlor to champion a rural cause and prove to the rural Americans who voted for him that despite not paying much attention to them since the election – and still not having an appointed Secretary of Agriculture – he and his team really do care.

Trump began his comments in Wisconsin by stating unequivocally that, “We're also going to stand up for our dairy farmers.” I hope that is the case, and that he and his team will muster up as much courage to criticize and reform American agricultural and trade policies as they have for Canadian policies.

The key piece of information in this story is that U.S. dairy farmers are simply producing too much milk. According to data from the U.S. Department of agriculture, 43 million gallons of milk were dumped in fields, manure lagoons or animal feed or were discarded at plants just in the first eight months of 2016.

Farmers are caught in a vicious cycle. When markets are up, farms often expand and production increases to take advantage of better prices. When the milk supply goes up and markets are down, farms often expand and production increases as they try to keep their heads above water. If that’s not a recipe for more of the same, I don’t know what is.

Here in Wisconsin, state programs like the Grow Wisconsin Dairy 30x20 Initiative have made the situation even worse. Beyond pushing Wisconsin dairy farmers to reach 30 billion pounds of milk production by 2020, the initiative—with no sense of irony—provides grants “to improve the long-term viability of Wisconsin’s Dairy Industry.” If you dive into data from USDA and the Wisconsin Agricultural Statistic Service, we’ve lost 2,411 dairy farms since March 2012 when the 30 x 20 initiative was announced.

That’s an average of almost 500 dairy farms per year. We are growing our production but it is being done by fewer and fewer, larger farms.

This all has a predictable end. Refusing to change our policies in agriculture right here at home will lead us further down the road to monopoly. We’re already firmly in the grasp of oligarchic practices with a small handful of massive, multinational conglomerates running the show in most sectors of agriculture.

Consolidation of land, farms, and corporations coupled with the death of the midsize farmer is encouraging ever more mergers, more vertical integration and more distance between your average citizens, the food they eat, the farmers who produce the food and

Wisconsin Farmers Union (external - login to view)
 
mentalfloss
#28
Will Trump's mastery of negotiation net him another win?

Only time will tell.
 
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