How U.S. spying cost Boeing multibillion-dollar jet contract


tay
#1
Dilma Rousseff was thoroughly charmed.

Brazil had been struggling for years to decide which company to choose for a $4 billion-plus fighter jet contract, one of the world's most sought-after defense deals and one that would help define the country's strategic alliances for decades to come.

But Rousseff, the leftist president known for being sometimes gruff and even standoffish with foreign leaders, was thrilled after a 90-minute meeting in Brasilia on May 31 with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.

After Biden's reassurances that the United States would not block crucial transfers of technological know-how to Brazil if it bought the jets, she was closer than ever to selecting Chicago-based Boeing to supply its fighter, the F/A-18 Super Hornet.

"She's ready to sign on the dotted line," one of her senior aides told Reuters at the time. "This is going to happen soon."

And then along came Edward Snowden.

On Wednesday, she surprised the defense and diplomatic worlds by tapping Sweden's Saab to supply the jets, a move aides said was made in part as a deliberate snub to the United States.

The decision was one of the biggest and most expensive consequences yet of the NSA revelations, which have strained Washington's relations with countries around the world.

A former guerrilla who had fought a U.S.-backed military dictatorship in the 1960s, Rousseff had spent the first two years of her presidency edging closer to Washington, fending off pressure from leftist elements of her Workers' Party and scheduling a rare state visit to the White House for last October.

Snowden's documents, many of which were published by Brazil-based U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald, revealed that Washington had spied on Rousseff's personal communications, those of state-run oil company Petrobras - which Rousseff once chaired - and countless Brazilian citizens.

Rousseff could not understand why Washington would spy on an ally with no history of international terrorism, aides said. She reacted by canceling her White House trip, despite attempts by U.S. President Barack Obama to ease her concerns, including a one-on-one meeting on the sidelines of a G20 meeting in Russia.

This week, she made a decision she believed would hit the United States where it hurt most - its pocketbook.


http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/20/us-boeing-brazil-insight-idUSBRE9BJ10P20131220
 
Kreskin
#2
Completely understandable. The program was a disaster waiting to happen from the start.
 
BaalsTears
-1
#3
Obama's NSA spying is hurting unionized workers in Washington state. Those are Obama voters. Those workers have been hoisted on their own petard.
 
tay
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by KreskinView Post

Completely understandable. The program was a disaster waiting to happen from the start.



Which program???
 
Goober
Free Thinker
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Which program???

Covert action in Colombia | The Washington Post
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#6  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTearsView Post

Obama's NSA spying is hurting unionized workers in Washington state. Those are Obama voters. Those workers have been hoisted on their own petard.

the spying was taking place long before Obama came on the scene.
 
BaalsTears
-1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

the spying was taking place long before Obama came on the scene.

This level of spying didn't exist prior to 2001. Bush was bad. Obama is worse. Is the difference between the two one of degree or magnitude? I don't know. Only historians will be able to answer that question.

However, the Boeing workers are still hanging on the petard. I suspect that in the fullness of time they will be joined by others.
 
B00Mer
Libertarian
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTearsView Post

Obama's NSA spying is hurting unionized workers in Washington state. Those are Obama voters. Those workers have been hoisted on their own petard.

....and they will still vote Democrat in the next election... You can't fix stupid.
 
BaalsTears
-1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

....and they will still vote Democrat in the next election... You can't fix stupid.

I agree. Voting Democratic is part of who they are.
 
taxslave
No Party Affiliation
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTearsView Post

I agree. Voting Democratic is part of who they are.

Not necessarily. In BC's provincial election this year a good number of union workers voted Liberal (BC version is slightly right) instead of the traditional NDP(far left) because the NDP does not represent our interests. Really they haven't represented working people's unions interests for about 20 years but rather government unions, rich socialists and freeloaders. The liberals are promoting resource industries and development which our jobs depend on while the NDP are against every project that we need. I can see the same happening in the US provided the Republicans do not shoot themselves in the head again by promoting a loonie tunes for prez. Also Obama can't run again so there is the people that voted dem to prove they are not racists to consider.
 
BaalsTears
-1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Not necessarily. In BC's provincial election this year a good number of union workers voted Liberal (BC version is slightly right) instead of the traditional NDP(far left) because the NDP does not represent our interests. Really they haven't represented working people's unions interests for about 20 years but rather government unions, rich socialists and freeloaders. The liberals are promoting resource industries and development which our jobs depend on while the NDP are against every project that we need. I can see the same happening in the US provided the Republicans do not shoot themselves in the head again by promoting a loonie tunes for prez. Also Obama can't run again so there is the people that voted dem to prove they are not racists to consider.

The Democratic Party in the US is an unholy alliance including, among others, workers and people who kill jobs. The job killers destroyed the lumber industry and are slowly killing agriculture in California. Imo the economic interests of private sector union members are more closely aligned with Republicans. People need jobs.
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
I love the propaganda line Obama's spying did everyone catch that?
America and everybody else has been spying on everybody else for
decades. US spying might have caused the problem with that I agree
but to suggest its his spy machine and not the countries is nonsense.
 
tay
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

I love the propaganda line Obama's spying did everyone catch that?
America and everybody else has been spying on everybody else for
decades. US spying might have caused the problem with that I agree
but to suggest its his spy machine and not the countries is nonsense.





Of course you're correct and if it wasn't for Snowden releasing the details the extent of how much 'spying' is being done wouldn't be known.


But Obama can suspend the decade old program but I suspect no one will ever know if the spying is continuing or not............






Tech executives to Obama: NSA spying revelations are hurting business






Leaders of the nation’s biggest technology firms warned President Obama during a lengthy meeting at the White House on Tuesday that National Security Agency spying programs are damaging their reputations and could harm the broader economy.


Cisco Systems has said it is seeing customers, especially overseas, back away from American-branded technology after documents revealed that the NSA enlisted tech firms and secretly tapped into their data hubs around the world as the agency pursued terrorism suspects. Companies such as IBM, AT&T and Verizon Communications are facing angry shareholders, some of whom have filed lawsuits demanding that the companies disclose their participation in NSA intelligence programs.


In Cisco’s earnings report last month, executives explained that disappointing sales in emerging markets were partly tied to the NSA leaks, which may have “caused a number of customers to pause and reevaluate,” Cisco’s head of sales, Robert Lloyd, said at the time.


Last week, IBM shareholders sued the company in a New York federal court, saying that it harmed investors with its secret participation in NSA programs.


Last month, shareholders of Verizon and AT&T demanded that the companies disclose their participation in NSA intelligence programs.


The $160.7 billion New York State Common Retirement Fund filed a resolution with AT&T’s board to make public its participation in government intelligence programs. The pension fund argued that customers can too easily switch to another wireless carrier amid concerns that AT&T is sharing telephone data and other information with the government.


The meeting at the White House was the second time top Silicon Valley and telecommunications leaders have convened with Obama since Snowden began to release portions of a trove of top-secret documents detailing NSA spying programs.




Tech executives to Obama: NSA spying revelations are threatening business - The Washington Post
 

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