Japan robot suit can help the elderly, disabled


SLM
#1
Japan robot suit can help the elderly, disabled



A robot suit that can help the elderly or disabled get around was given its global safety certificate in Japan on Wednesday, paving the way for its worldwide rollout.
The Hybrid Assistive Limb, or HAL, is a power-assisted pair of legs developed by Japanese robot maker Cyberdyne, which has also developed similar robot arms.
A quality assurance body issued the certificate based on a draft version of an international safety standard for personal robots that is expected to be approved later this year, the ministry for the economy, trade and industry said.
The metal-and-plastic exoskeleton has become the first nursing-care robot certified under the draft standard, a ministry official said.
Battery-powered HAL, which detects muscle impulses to anticipate and support the user's body movements, is designed to help the elderly with mobility or help hospital or nursing carers to lift patients.
Cyberdyne, based in Tsukuba, northeast of Tokyo, has so far leased some 330 suits to 150 hospitals, welfare and other facilities in Japan since 2010, at 178,000 yen ($1,950) per suit per year.


"It is very significant that Japan has obtained this certification before others in the world," said Yoshiyuki Sankai, the head of Cyberdyne.
The company is unrelated to the firm of the same name responsible for the cyborg assassin played by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1984 film "The Terminator".
"This is a first step forward for Japan, the great robot nation, to send our message to the world about robots of the future," said Sankai, who is also a professor at Tsukuba University.
A different version of HAL -- coincidentally the name of the evil supercomputer in Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" -- has been developed for workers who need to wear heavy radiation protection as part of the clean-up at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.
Industrial robots have long been used in Japan, and robo-suits are gradually making inroads into hospitals and retirement homes.
But critics say the government has been slow in creating a safety framework for such robots in a country whose rapidly-ageing population is expected to enjoy ever longer lives.

CANOE -- Technology: Japan robot suit can help the elderly, disabled (external - login to view)

Neat stuff!!!

And this
Quote:

The company is unrelated to the firm of the same name responsible for the cyborg assassin played by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1984 film "The Terminator".

will just help us all sleep better at night, lol.
 
Blackleaf
#2
British scientists at the University of Salford have come up with a robot that can look after the elderly:

Robot to care for elderly made at University of Salford

26th February 2013
BBC News


The robot is designed to take meals to residents


A robot designed to help care for elderly people has been invented at the University of Salford.

"Carebot" P37 S65 can be programmed to remind them to take medication and exercise, answer questions and even tell them jokes.

Researcher Antonio Espingardeiro, who developed the robot, said it could help care home staff and improve residents' quality of life.

It can recognise faces and recall the requirements of each patient, he said.

The robot can also be programmed with speech therapy and object recognition exercises to help people with dementia.

It is capable of acting as a video link to keep in touch with doctors and family, playing games and giving updates on the news.

The robot, standing at about the height of a person, can also carry meals to residents.

Mr Espingardeiro is looking for investment to perfect the robot before selling it.

He said: "Care of the elderly is a difficult issue but as populations age we're facing a difficult choice.

"I've already established that robots can provide meaningful interaction to supplement human contact, and from my work with care homes I've seen first-hand how both staff and residents benefit from their presence."

BBC News - Robot to care for elderly made at University of Salford (external - login to view)
 
SLM
#3
Well that doesn't look like the Terminator either.
 
captain morgan
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Well that doesn't look like the Terminator either.


This is more at the Astroboy or Jetsons level right now, it takes time to get to the Terminator level of technological advancement...

Baby-steps here SLM.
 
karrie
+1
#5
More Star Trek tech coming to life. Crazy stuff!
 
SLM
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

This is more at the Astroboy or Jetsons level right now, it takes time to get to the Terminator level of technological advancement...

Baby-steps here SLM.

It's not that I'm looking for world wide domination per se......but that's a whole other thread anyway.

Lol.

Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

More Star Trek tech coming to life. Crazy stuff!

I LOVE it! I pay particular attention to these news releases because, as a caregiver to a disabled family member, I realize just how difficult mundane everyday tasks can be and how much freedom these 'Star Trek' devices would give to so many people!
 
petros
#7
Quote:

I realize just how difficult mundane everyday tasks can be and how much freedom these 'Star Trek' devices would give to so many people!

There is freedom attached to a tricorder? Billions of text zombies with giant thumbs is not progress.
 
SLM
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

There is freedom attached to a tricorder? Billions of text zombies with giant thumbs is not progress.

It can be. A cell phone can provided a measure of safety for a disabled or elderly person. A suit, like the one in the OP, can possibly mean the difference between being able to get out of bed in your own home and having to live in a Long Term Care facility.
 
petros
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

It can be. A cell phone can provided a measure of safety for a disabled or elderly person. A suit, like the one in the OP, can possibly mean the difference between being able to get out of bed in your own home and having to live in a Long Term Care facility.

There is a better system in use already called Lifeline - Canada's #1 medical alert system and personal response service (external - login to view)

In a world where everyone else has a tricorder, I get by just fine. if I were hard pressed, I could walk up to anyone and ask to use theirs and phone Botswana for help.
 
karrie
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

There is a better system in use already called Lifeline - Canada's #1 medical alert system and personal response service (external - login to view)

In a world where everyone else has a tricorder, I get by just fine. if I were hard pressed, I could walk up to anyone and ask to use theirs and phone Botswana for help.


my grandpa can't ask me questions about his medications on 'lifeline'. He can't check in on grandma with it either, when she's out on her walks. it's great that you are living your life the way you want, with what you want. why the hate for other people doing the same?
 
SLM
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

There is a better system in use already called Lifeline - Canada's #1 medical alert system and personal response service (external - login to view)

In a world where everyone else has a tricorder, I get by just fine. if I were hard pressed, I could walk up to anyone and ask to use theirs and phone Botswana for help.

Well that's great for you. But I actually feel better knowing that my disabled mother has her cell phone with her at all times when she leaves the house.

Don't knock the technology just because some people don't use it in a manner that you deem worthy.
 
L Gilbert
#12
Old stuff. The first suit I heard of for the disabled was Ekso. And that was a later version of the Exohiker. Exoskeletal suits started blooming in the mid 2000s.
 

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