World reaction to American election


#juan
No Party Affiliation
#1
http://tinyurl.com/ycds3n

CBS/AP) Strong Democratic gains in the U.S. elections were seen around the world as a potent rejection of the war in Iraq and the beginning of the end of Republican George W. Bush's presidency.

The Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives did not spark widespread fears of government paralysis in Washington, but some expected increasing pressure on Bush to alter course in Iraq and other policies.

The shift in power was also seen as a signal in some capitals that it was time to prepare for an eventual Democratic-led government, while others foresaw a greater emphasis on trade policy and human rights.

In Asia, across the Middle East and in Europe, the results were seen by many as a painful — and well-deserved — blow that left Bush significantly weakened for his remaining two years in office
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#2
http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/...661757161.html

Michael Gawenda, Washington
November 9, 2006
*

MOST of the time, mid-term American congressional elections do not have a huge impact beyond the United States. They are most often about domestic policies — the state of the economy, education, health care.
But this election has overwhelmingly been about foreign policy, Iraq in particular, and it has fundamentally changed the American political landscape. The consequence for the Bush Administration — and for the world — will be profound.
So this was not just another mid-term election. That is clear from the evidence that there has been a very high voter turn-out, particularly in those closely contested states in the Midwest and Northeast where the election was essentially decided.
Many Americans are angry and unhappy about the direction the Bush Administration and
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#3
Never in recent memory have Europeans been so devoted to the outcome of a midterm U.S. election. While presidential contests are watched with great interest, the fates of senators and representatives usually fly far below the radar of a continent that itself holds a major election almost every week.
But this one is different. It is, as Le Monde said in the editorial accompanying a thick special section this weekend devoted to the election, "a referendum for or against the policies of George W. Bush."
And if one thing unites Europeans these days, it is opposition to Mr. Bush.
 
Colpy
Conservative
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Never in recent memory have Europeans been so devoted to the outcome of a midterm U.S. election. While presidential contests are watched with great interest, the fates of senators and representatives usually fly far below the radar of a continent that itself holds a major election almost every week.
But this one is different. It is, as Le Monde said in the editorial accompanying a thick special section this weekend devoted to the election, "a referendum for or against the policies of George W. Bush."
And if one thing unites Europeans these days, it is opposition to Mr. Bush.

What motivates Europe is opposition to the United States.....France and Germany suffer from a serious case of envy......both think THEY should run the world, and behave childishly whenever the Superpower is involved.

That said, I too am somewhat pleased about the election. The Bush administration needed a strong set of brakes applied.......not to their foreign policy, but to domestic policy.

I have no tolerance for "anti-terror" legislation that makes a mockery of basic legal rights.

As well, the level of deficit spending by the US gov't is insane.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#5
Quote:

That said, I too am somewhat pleased about the election. The Bush administration needed a strong set of brakes applied.......not to their foreign policy, but to domestic policy.

They had a foreign policy?? Wonder what it was...let me see...Tell lies to get the war started. Tell more lies to convince the American public...Bomb the sh-t out of the country, destroying most of the infrastructure, Pull Saddam from power...leaving a power vacuum that would lead to a civil war like everyone warned. I don't think Iraq can stand much more of that "foreign policy".

Colpy, you and I will have to agree to disagree on Bush...
 
ottawabill
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

What motivates Europe is opposition to the United States.....France and Germany suffer from a serious case of envy......both think THEY should run the world, and behave childishly whenever the Superpower is involved.

That said, I too am somewhat pleased about the election. The Bush administration needed a strong set of brakes applied.......not to their foreign policy, but to domestic policy.

I have no tolerance for "anti-terror" legislation that makes a mockery of basic legal rights.

As well, the level of deficit spending by the US gov't is insane.

HERE HERE!!!

total agreement!!

The adminstration will not fall apart from this but we are finally back to a proper checks and balances Government. The pull from Iraq will NOT happen but nor will free spending without a plan of action occur.

Democrats are not always good for Canada (protectionist) but they will be great to ask the hard questions that have not been asked for the entire Bush Admin.

It has also left a very bad taste with me about the terror laws...Seeming to be more like the USSR disguized as Freedom....Build a wall around to Mexico to keep us safe....Isn't that what the East Germans said?

Tell you closest friend and trading partner to show a passport..the are shutting themselves in..and I don't like it..what happened to U.S. friend of the free world??? eh
 
Jay
#7
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/03/wo...ynl2n13utPA6/A


Quote:

The Web site, “Operation Iraqi Freedom Document Portal,” was a constantly expanding portrait of prewar Iraq. Its many thousands of documents included everything from a collection of religious and nationalistic poetry to instructions for the repair of parachutes to handwritten notes from Mr. Hussein’s intelligence service. It became a popular quarry for a legion of bloggers, translators and amateur historians.
Among the dozens of documents in English were Iraqi reports written in the 1990s and in 2002 for United Nations inspectors in charge of making sure Iraq had abandoned its unconventional arms programs after the Persian Gulf war. Experts say that at the time, Mr. Hussein’s scientists were on the verge of building an atom bomb, as little as a year away.
European diplomats said this week that some of those nuclear documents on the Web site were identical to the ones presented to the United Nations Security Council in late 2002, as America got ready to invade Iraq. But unlike those on the Web site, the papers given to the Security Council had been extensively edited, to remove sensitive information on unconventional arms.
The deletions, the diplomats said, had been done in consultation with the United States and other nuclear-weapons nations. Mohamed ElBaradei , the director of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which ran the nuclear part of the inspections, told the Security Council in late 2002 that the deletions were “consistent with the principle that proliferation-sensitive information should not be released.”
In Europe, a senior diplomat said atomic experts there had studied the nuclear documents on the Web site and judged their public release as potentially dangerous. “It’s a cookbook,” said the diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of his agency’s rules. “If you had this, it would short-circuit a lot of things.”
The New York Times had examined dozens of the documents and asked a half dozen nuclear experts to evaluate some of them.
Peter D. Zimmerman, a physicist and former United States government arms scientist now at the war studies department of King’s College, London, called the posted material “very sensitive, much of it undoubtedly secret restricted data.”
Ray E. Kidder, a senior nuclear physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, an arms design center, said “some things in these documents would be helpful” to nations aspiring to develop nuclear weapons and should have remained secret.

 
EagleSmack
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by ottawabill View Post

HERE HERE!!!

total agreement!!

The adminstration will not fall apart from this but we are finally back to a proper checks and balances Government. The pull from Iraq will NOT happen but nor will free spending without a plan of action occur.

Democrats are not always good for Canada (protectionist) but they will be great to ask the hard questions that have not been asked for the entire Bush Admin.

It has also left a very bad taste with me about the terror laws...Seeming to be more like the USSR disguized as Freedom....Build a wall around to Mexico to keep us safe....Isn't that what the East Germans said?

Tell you closest friend and trading partner to show a passport..the are shutting themselves in..and I don't like it..what happened to U.S. friend of the free world??? eh

I think you are stretching what is really going on though. Since the Patriot Act my life has not changed one bit. Not one. I do not have anybody tailing me, I am not stopped in the streets by secret police checking for my ID. This is just liberal scare tactics. My liberty has not been affected at all.

Probably because I am not a criminal or a terrorist.

We are building a fence on the Mexican border to keep THOUSANDS of illegal aliens out. I can tell you right now, if you had an impovershed (sic) country that was flooding Canada you would want it to stop as well. Illegal immigration is a huge problem here so it is easy for you to look over the fence and say

"Hey America... why are you being so mean? Let them in."

They aren't coming in your yard like they are ours.
 
I think not
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

I think you are stretching what is really going on though. Since the Patriot Act my life has not changed one bit. Not one. I do not have anybody tailing me, I am not stopped in the streets by secret police checking for my ID. This is just liberal scare tactics. My liberty has not been affected at all.

Probably because I am not a criminal or a terrorist.

We are building a fence on the Mexican border to keep THOUSANDS of illegal aliens out. I can tell you right now, if you had an impovershed (sic) country that was flooding Canada you would want it to stop as well. Illegal immigration is a huge problem here so it is easy for you to look over the fence and say

"Hey America... why are you being so mean? Let them in."

They aren't coming in your yard like they are ours.

Actually it's because 3 provisions of the Patriot Act were struck down as being unconstitutional, and it was revised recently to amount to just about nothing, Thanks in large part to the Democrats and the ACLU.
 
MikeyDB
#10
Gee I hadn't noticed, was there an election in the U.S.?

Did anybody win?
 
LittleRunningGag
Free Thinker
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

while others foresaw a greater emphasis on trade policy

Hmmm... A greater emphasis on trade policy by a traditionally protectionist party? Is that a good thing for the rest of the world?

Don't get me wrong, I am very much in favour of a Democrat run congress but lets not get ahead of ourselves here. Shall we keep things in perspective?
 
Gonzo
#12
I think the United States is traditionally protectionist country.
I dont understand how Americans can be angry at their president now and not years ago. The whole world saw the errors Bush was making, but he got re-elected. You get what you deserve.
 
Hotshot
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo View Post

I think the United States is traditionally protectionist country.
I dont understand how Americans can be angry at their president now and not years ago. The whole world saw the errors Bush was making, but he got re-elected. You get what you deserve.

Exactly, they were idiots 2 years ago. Its too little, too late now.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1
#14  Top Rated Post
What is especially compelling is the sense of renewed optimism among the citizenry. After the election results were announced, everybody that I spoke to was absolutely ecstatic. All felt that we can and will rebuild the USA so that we can reemerge as the world's number one nation.

We Yanks are a very patriotic bunch. The vast majority of us genuinely love our country and the depth of that love is beyond all description. For too long we allowed the unpatriotic elements to rule and to brainwash people into thinking that their evil ways were best for us and for the world. Thankfully, however, we patriots did not give up on our ideals. We are now galvanized and more motivated than ever to take back what is ours.

The election was only step one in a thousand mile journey towards making USA # 1 once again. And we are more determined than ever to live up to our true ideals of international peace, brethrenship, and prosperity. Nothing will stop us. Nothing.


 

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