Trudeau and the Pipelines


Girth
+3
#1
This is a thread to comment on any action/inaction our PM takes in regards to the pipelines. This includes his action/inaction in regards to protests, blockades, approvals, etc. I will start off:

Via Rail to cancel trains across the country; CN shutting down rails in eastern Canada

BY MARYAM SHAH GLOBAL NEWS
Posted February 13, 2020 2:59 pm

All Via Rail train services in Canada are cancelled as CN announced a shutdown of its eastern Canada network over blockades.

“Following an advisory from the infrastructure owner that they are ceasing all rail operations across their entire network, VIA Rail has no other option but to cancel its services, effective immediately and until further notice,” said a statement on Via Rail’s website.


Previously, Via Rail had cancelled all train service between Montreal and Toronto and between Ottawa and Toronto, cancelling all departures in both directions until the end of Friday due to the blockade near Belleville, Ont.

Via Rail says it will automatically issue full refunds for the cancelled trips, but cautioned that it could take up to 15 days for the transactions to go through.

“You do not need to contact VIA Rail to confirm the refund, but note that due to the volume of transactions it may take up to 15 days to receive,” the website said.

Earlier on Thursday, Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller and B.C. Premier John Horgan were working to arrange meetings with Indigenous leaders in an attempt to stop the blockades.

Miller wrote a letter to three chiefs in Ontario regarding the protest on Tyendinaga Mohawk traditional territory that has halted freight and passenger traffic between Toronto and Montreal. He offered to meet at a location of their choice on Saturday.

“My request, that I ask you kindly to consider, is to discontinue the protest and barricade of the train tracks as soon as practicable. As you well know, this is a highly volatile situation and the safety of all involved is of the utmost importance to me,” Miller said in the email, a copy of which he posted publicly Thursday morning.

CN announced Thursday afternoon that it “has been forced to initiate a disciplined and progressive shutdown” of its eastern Canada operations.

“This will include stopping and safely securing all trans-continental trains across its Canadian network and may imminently lead to temporary layoffs within the company’s Eastern Canadian operational staff,” a statement on CN’s website said.

The statement also said that Via Rail service between cities “will be discontinued” across CN’s Canadian network.

“However, commuter rail services, such as Metrolinx and Exo, can keep operating so long as they can do so safely,” the statement said.

A spokesperson for the southern Ontario regional transit agency Metrolinx told Global News that they are monitoring the situation.


Shortly after CN’s announcement, Teamsters Canada called on the Canadian government to “intervene to find a solution to the blockades.”

In a statement posted online Thursday, Canada’s largest union in the transport sector said the shutdown by CN could impact up to 6,000 workers at CN and other companies.

“We urge Ottawa to intervene to help find a solution as soon as possible,” said François Laporte, the union’s national president.

Blockades went up last week across Canada, with organizers saying they’re acting in solidarity with those opposed to the Coastal GasLink pipeline project that crosses the traditional territory of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation near Houston, B.C.

Coastal GasLink says it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the 670-kilometre route, but the hereditary chiefs in the Wet’suwet’en First Nation say they have title to a vast section of the land and never relinquished that by signing a treaty.

Without their consent, the project cannot be built, they say, and they’ve repeatedly gone to court to stop it — without success.

source: https://globalnews.ca/news/6548528/v...pDFExCBhXNOJZw
 
petros
+5
#2
Too scared to arrest 100 saboteurs is pathetic even for Trudeau.

When he grows up or get an Rx for effexor will the regret and shame be overwhelming?
 
taxslave
+4
#3
So far all we have gotten from TrudOWE and Horgan is inaction. Except to arrest the guy that was cleaning up the mess protesters left on the highway near Courtenay.
All our politicians need a large dose of Tryactin.
 
captain morgan
+5
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

So far all we have gotten from TrudOWE and Horgan is inaction. Except to arrest the guy that was cleaning up the mess protesters left on the highway near Courtenay.
All our politicians need a large dose of Tryactin.


Trudeau et al don't need any medication, unless that Rx can help them grow a set of balls. Other than that, a smack upside the head might work
 
Girth
+3
#5
Rex Murphy: Climate zealots have taken Canada hostage. And our PM is missing in action
Meantime we are days away from the most significant policy decision this government will make — presuming it remains the government

I’m familiar with absentee landlords from grade school history. The concept of an absentee prime minister is a brand new one to me.

Justin Trudeau has been a week now waltzing around Africa while, day by day back here in carbon-tax Canada, the country is seizing up. For the same past seven days apparently, Canada has been under the administration of what the media insists on calling “anti-pipeline” forces.

Anti-pipeline is far too narrow. These are the anti-industry, anti-energy, anti-Alberta, climate-change save-the-worlders who have been harassing the country for years. The difference is in the past week they’ve upped their opposition, and from one end of the country to another decided to muscle their way to a victory by a storm of blockades, protests, traffic obstruction, and in the case of Victoria, B.C., actually shutting down the people’s legislature.

These are the anti-industry, anti-energy, anti-Alberta, save-the-worlders who have been harassing the country for years

Meantime PM I’m-out-of-the-country-again sends bulletins of feeble non-assurance from sunny Senegal. And such bulletins they are. “PM urges quick resolution …” As VIA Rail shuts down, and his own deputy prime minister is denied entrance to the Halifax mayor’s office, the globe-trotter PM “urges quick resolution.”

When there is a national crisis, and there is a national crisis, to whom do we justly look for a resolution? Why the prime minister of the nation. Instead of leadership in this case however, we get a statement that surely implies he thinks the “resolution” is in some other hands. Further in the same statement — and I love this — he called for “all parties to dialogue.” Whenever in any really tense situation a politician hauls out the infinitive “to dialogue,” you may take it to the bank he has not a clue about how to handle it.

What’s “to dialogue?” Is it defying court injunctions? Is it barring your deputy prime minister from pursuing her duties? Do you want to have a chat about shutting down a provincial legislature? Bringing the commerce of a nation to a standstill by rail blockades? Threatening a great energy project that has gone through all the tests and assessments and which holds vast promise of economic benefits and jobs? Watching the police forces of the nation stand by in perfect impotence before eco-radicals? Making a joke out of the so-highly-touted rule of law while the country seizes up under pressure from zealots?


How did Canada get to this point? Easy. The elevation of the doomsday cult of global warming, the insistence that Canada has some unique and precious role in saving the planet, the hostility to the oil industry that is the logical extension of that attitude has given vast licence to anti-oil types to more or less do what they want. And now they are. The steadfast refusal to defend the industry, always bending to the other side to placate the protesters, the demonstrators; muttering on constantly about carbon dioxide “pollution;” caving in on every occasion there is an interruption in a legal development: all of these things were a bugle call to those who like to think their cause is above normal politics, above normal protest, and most of all, as we have seen this week, above the courts and the legislatures.

Environmentalists think they are a group apart. If 10 plumbers shut down a railway, or if loggers shut down the B.C. legislature, or if oil workers decided to “shut down Canada,” the RCMP and every security force in the nation would round them up, clap on the handcuffs and stow them away in a cell in a jiffy. But a few native bands, and the always available professional protesters who we have seen active since the days of the Seattle riots, decide to ride on the oil issue, and everyone in authority stands aside mute and fearful.

If 10 plumbers shut down a railway, or if loggers shut down the B.C. legislature … the RCMP would clap on the handcuffs

And our always itinerant prime minister, on another vainglorious question — this time for a useless seat on the useless UN Security Council — urges “all sides to resolve this as quickly as possible.”

Meantime we are days away from the most significant policy decision this government will make — presuming it remains the government, which in the present circumstances is an open question — the Teck oilsands mine.

Should that decision be negative, should Alberta once again be denied its right to pursue its economic interests, should a $20-billion investment be strangled in the interests of our sacred “Paris commitments,” then I fear that in at least a part of the country the protests and disruptions we have seen this week will be a timid display compared with the anger that will come out of the West.


And let me make something else clear. It is by no means only the oil industry that is paying the price for the environmental obsession of the present Liberal government. Head out West, talk to farmers, talk to loggers, talk to downtown business people, taxi-drivers, waitresses … talk to anyone. The so-called carbon tax is a bomb. It does nothing but put extra strains on everyone. Farmers can’t buy fuel to dry their grain, and save their crop, without tossing in thousands of extra dollars for the holy gods of global warming — and doing so, it should be mentioned, while temperatures are a balmy –40 and -50 degrees centigrade. It is policy as a kind of madness.

It is an old and venerable saying: they who sow the wind shall reap the whirlwind. That is so appropriate for climate-change protest politics. By insisting for their full tenure that “climate change” is “Canada’s No. 1 priority” the Liberal government has stimulated the current rage that is seizing the country.

It is an old and venerable saying: they who sow the wind shall reap the whirlwind

Climate-change radicals always think of themselves as inhabitors of a separate morality, one superior to that of the vast majority who work for a living and simply don’t have time to paint their faces every second week to stage some protest. And we’re getting a taste of what it’s like when they exercise that superior morality this week.

Mr. Trudeau should be home. I know this is an agreeable time of year to be touring Africa, but a week under the carbon-taxed skies of Alberta or Saskatchewan right now would be so much more appropriate and useful.

Oh yes, not one in a hundred Canadians, and I’m being generous, gives a damn about Canada getting a seat on the security council.
 
taxslave
+3
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Trudeau et al don't need any medication, unless that Rx can help them grow a set of balls. Other than that, a smack upside the head might work

That is what Tryactin does. Tryactin like a man instead of a pussy.
 
Dixie Cup
+4
#7
I wonder where one could move to where the weather is relatively warm, where the cost of living is reasonable & there is health care available and the taxes are low. Hmmmmm - anyone?? Wishful thinking I'm sure.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

I wonder where one could move to where the weather is relatively warm, where the cost of living is reasonable & there is health care available and the taxes are low. Hmmmmm - anyone?? Wishful thinking I'm sure.

Ukraine, just might have to dodge the odd Russian missile

18% personal tax rate

Universal health care

https://tradingeconomics.com/ukraine/temperature Much like interior BC. Unless along the Black Sea then like the coast

Quote:

Ukraine Average Temperature 1743-2018 | Data | Chart | Calendar. Temperature in Ukraine decreased to 1.52 celsius in December from 5.15 celsius in November of 2015. Temperature in Ukraine averaged 7.67 celsius from 1743 until 2015, reaching an all time high of 24.30 celsius in July of 1757 and a record low of -14.72 celsius in February of 1929

.
 
DaSleeper
+4
#9
Why doesn't Alberta send a couple dozen oil field workers to that railway blockade?
I'm sure they would enjoy the exercise!
 
Mowich
+5
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Why doesn't Alberta send a couple dozen oil field workers to that railway blockade?
I'm sure they would enjoy the exercise!

I understand the sentiment but can't support the idea, Das. AB gets enough bad press. It doesn't need more and you can bet it will be all about AB and not a bunch of oil field workers if things go bad.

I've stopped watching the news. If I see one more journalist lead off with an interview from some 'whitey' manning a rail blockade in ON, I will completely lose it. Why aren't they interviewing all the FNs along the line who are just as pissed off about thugs and wanna be significant dolts on the blockades - and who are seeing shortages of goods and services due to the rail line blockades. Why aren't they out talking to the Canadians adversely affected by the rail stoppages? You know, the taxpaying Canadians who can't make it to their doctor's appointments? There was letter to the editor in the Sun today by the driver of a van that transports cancer patients for their treatments. Their appointments were cancelled because they couldn't get to the clinic in time. It isn't just about wanting to get to work.
 
Girth
+5
#11
NP View: If Trudeau has lost interest in his job, perhaps he should quit
While Chrystia Freeland and other cabinet members have struggled to deal with the rail blockades, Trudeau has been flying around Africa and Europe


Over his four years as prime minister, it has become noteworthy how often Justin Trudeau faces problems of his own making.
His sanctimony keeps coming back to bite him. Canadians who follow politics have long been aware of the prime minister’s weakness for pious declarations of well-intentioned morality. His success in defeating the Conservative government of Stephen Harper owed much to the stark contrast between Trudeau’s starry-eyed optimism and Harper’s no-fun pragmatism.

It may have seemed at the time that tying himself to a shining idealism offered little to lose for the Liberal leader. Unfortunately, the years since have demonstrated otherwise.
His sanctimony keeps coming back to bite him
Staunch assertions of his devotion to feminism, for instance, ran aground when he found himself faced with a senior female cabinet minister who assiduously refused to cave to his demands that she change her position on a Quebec-based company seeking political help from the government. Jody Wilson-Raybould’s principled stand saw her badmouthed by colleagues, arm-twisted to concede, turfed from her job and ultimately hustled right out of the Liberal caucus by an intransigent Trudeau.

The emergence of photographs of the prime minister prancing around in black- and brown-face on repeated occasions would have been humiliating in any context, but took on a deeply hypocritical aspect given his regular paeans to the glories of diversity and attestations of devotion to Canada’s multicultural nature. He maintained he’d been young and foolish at the time, blind to the insensitivity and insult of his actions, but a less vainglorious person might have held off on the boasting once he cottoned on to the mistakes he’d made.
Construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline, and other energy projects, was never going to be easy given concerns over environmental impacts, but Trudeau greatly complicated the decision he would one day face by trying to play both sides against the middle. While assuring Albertans of his appreciation for the crucial nature of the energy industry, he egged on activists with pledges of support for “social licence” and legislation making it infinitely harder to win regulatory approval for pipeline projects or tanker traffic. His tactics backed the government into a corner when Trans Mountain looked in danger of cancellation, forcing it to purchase the pipeline for $4.5 billion and saddle taxpayers with a project now expected to cost $12.6 billion, up from a previous estimate of $7.4 billion. The political capital expended on that decision only increased the difficulty of rendering judgment on the Frontier mine, a $20.6-billion oilsands megaproject that once again pits the environment against the economy, with Ottawa caught between its past assertions of sympathy and support for both sides.

Of all the prime minister’s stated priorities, none has enjoyed greater prominence than his oft-professed determination to achieve reconciliation with Canada’s Indigenous people. There is no question there is much to atone for in the country’s shoddy historic treatment of native communities, and considerable sympathy for government efforts to right the record. But once again Trudeau finds himself up against his own artlessness.
Once again Trudeau finds himself up against his own artlessness
Canada’s Indigenous community is not a single unified body with universally recognized leadership and established policies. It is a collection of widely differing interests, pressure groups, power points and varying regional, political and economic agendas that are often at odds across geographical regions, and within communities themselves. At the moment, a collection of Indigenous protesters has managed to cause serious disruption to train services across the country by blockading rail tracks. The blockade in Ontario is in sympathy with actions in British Columbia that have been ruled illegal. The B.C. protest was ordered by hereditary chiefs who are at odds with elected Indigenous leaders. Police are reluctant to act against groups that have taken the law into their own hands for fear of making things worse. Canadians are caught in the middle.

The prime minister has been nowhere on this. While deputy prime minister Chrystia Freeland and other cabinet members have struggled to contain the situation, Trudeau has been flying around Africa in search of votes for a temporary seat on the United Nations Security Council, a pet project that few voters would consider a matter of vital importance. At a stop-off in Germany Trudeau allowed that Canada is “a country of laws” and also, of course, that there is “freedom to demonstrate and to protest.”

“Getting that balance right and wrapping it up in the path forward … is really important.”
A protester walks on closed CN Rail tracks on the ninth day of the blockade in Tyendinaga, near Belleville, Ont., on Feb. 14, 2020.
Gee, thanks. And whose job would it be to get that balance right but the prime minister, who has done so much to talk the country into a position where protesters feel free to ignore the courts, and police feel helpless to intervene, all in the name of reconciliation efforts that can only lose public sympathy the longer the spectacle persists.
If Justin Trudeau has lost interest in his job perhaps he should call a leadership vote so someone with greater concern can take on these issues. He would then be free to express his high-minded ideals unhampered by any responsibility for successfully putting them to work.
source: https://nationalpost.com/opinion/np-...he-should-quit
 
DaSleeper
+5
#12
Trudeau is in office to serve the taxpayers of Canada...
The question to ask is How many of those protesters are taxpayers?
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Trudeau is in office to serve the taxpayers of Canada...
The question to ask is How many of those protesters are taxpayers?

Do non profit corporations count?
 
Hoid
#14
When will Prime Minister Trudeau save us all from ourselves?

Help us Shiny Pony!
 
Girth
+2
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

When will Prime Minister Trudeau save us all from ourselves?
Help us Shiny Pony!

Go away.
 
Girth
+5
#16
Mike Smyth: As the blockaders get bolder, pressure rises on Horgan and Trudeau

Published:
February 15, 2020

Political nerves are getting frayed as the anti-pipeline blockades continue. With budget day — and more protests — looming, what can Horgan and Trudeau do? As anti-pipeline blockaders ramp up their activities, pressure is growing on Premier John Horgan and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to do something about the mayhem.

So far, both levels of government have shown incredible restraint in dealing with protesters blocking roads, bridges, ferries, train tracks and public buildings as they fight the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

Police forces are also holding back in an effort to avoid escalation and make the conflict worse.

“We can’t just use force,” Horgan told the legislature last week. “It needs to be dealt with by co-operation, by consultation, by discussion, so that we can all move forward.”

Trudeau rejected opposition demands to send in the RCMP to break up blockades and arrest protesters.

“We are not the kind of country where politicians get to tell the police what to do in operational matters,” Trudeau said. “We will ensure that everything is done to resolve this through dialogue and constructive outcomes.”

But patience is wearing thin as the blockaders grow bolder.

For Horgan’s NDP government, events took on a heightened political peril when protesters blocked the West Coast Express tracks last week. The commuter train is a vital transportation link in closely contested political battlegrounds: Port Coquitlam, Pitt Meadows, Maple Ridge, Mission.

The New Democrats broke through in these suburbs in the last election and stole crucial ridings from the Liberals in razor-close races.

Entire elections can be won and lost in these tight swing seats. And once the blockaders targeted their voters, the government’s tone became harsher.

“Blocking West Coast Express is not lawful or peaceful protest, it is unacceptable and a disgrace,” Solicitor-General Mike Farnworth — the NDP MLA for Port Coquitlam — wrote on Twitter.

But the Liberals had a simple response to that: What are you going to do it about it, Mike?

“What’s the plan here?” asked Cheryl Ashlie, the former Maple Ridge city councillor running for the Liberals in the next election.

She ripped the NDP’s weak response to commuter chaos caused by a group of “well-funded radical activists.”

“This is essentially 500 people trying to stop the economy from performing,” she said. “Horgan is just not doing his job.”

She took a targeted swipe at NDP cabinet minister Lisa Beare, her opponent in the next election, who fired off her own Tweet after the rail blockade.


“Stopping commuter trains is unacceptable,” Beare wrote, before service was later restored. “My hope is CP Rail will work to ensure service can resume quickly and safely.”

But Ashlie only saw more weakness in that.

“‘Hope’ is something you bring to the equation after you’ve tried everything else,” she said, adding the government should be seeking court injunctions against the blockaders.

Injunctions require evidence to be laid before a judge and can be tough to secure, although Darryl Plecas, the Speaker of the legislature, showed the way last week.

After protesters blockaded the legislature building on Tuesday, Plecas ordered the collection of evidence for a judge.

The evidence included security-camera footage showing protesters mapping out legislature entrances and deploying people to block them.

It easily convinced a judge, who issued a sweeping injunction against further blockades of the building, and there have been no repeats of Tuesday’s mayhem.


“We had to clearly demonstrate why we needed the injunction, but we had lots of evidence,” said Alan Mullen, Plecas’ chief of staff. “Protesters screaming in people’s faces, yelling all kinds of insults. In some cases, people being pushed and shoved. That is not okay.”

The injunction will likely prevent another blockade of the legislature this Tuesday, when Finance Minister Carole James presents the budget.

But the injunction only applies to the legislature building and not the nearby Victoria Convention Centre, where more budget-day events are planned.

As Horgan and Trudeau continue their cautious approach, other critics wonder why police officers are not taking a firmer one.

“We’ve politicized our police agencies to the extent that they’re afraid to do what they have to do,” said Kash Heed, the former Liberal solicitor-general.

Heed found it “disturbing” that Vancouver police allowed protesters to blockade the Cambie-Broadway intersection for 16 hours last week.

“We’ve crossed a line. We’re allowing this to happen,” Heed said. “We’re not taking enforcement action when required.”


He said that doesn’t mean you send in the riot squad every time there’s a protest, but failing to clear a major intersection for 16 hours is going to the other extreme.

“I’m not saying it should be hats-and-bats all the time,” Heed said. “But there are ways to deal with this so protesters don’t disrupt people’s lives.”

Geoff Plant, the former Liberal attorney-general, said police don’t need a court injunction to enforce the law.

“People who block streets and highways and bridges should be arrested and charged,” Plant said.

If the blockades continue, the demands for enforcement will get louder, and the pressure will increase on Horgan and Trudeau.
 
Ron in Regina
+4
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Rex Murphy: Climate zealots have taken Canada hostage. And our PM is missing in action
Meantime we are days away from the most significant policy decision this government will make — presuming it remains the government

I’m familiar with absentee landlords from grade school history. The concept of an absentee prime minister is a brand new one to me.

Justin Trudeau has been a week now waltzing around Africa while, day by day back here in carbon-tax Canada, the country is seizing up. For the same past seven days apparently, Canada has been under the administration of what the media insists on calling “anti-pipeline” forces.

Anti-pipeline is far too narrow. These are the anti-industry, anti-energy, anti-Alberta, climate-change save-the-worlders who have been harassing the country for years. The difference is in the past week they’ve upped their opposition, and from one end of the country to another decided to muscle their way to a victory by a storm of blockades, protests, traffic obstruction, and in the case of Victoria, B.C., actually shutting down the people’s legislature.

These are the anti-industry, anti-energy, anti-Alberta, save-the-worlders who have been harassing the country for years

Meantime PM I’m-out-of-the-country-again sends bulletins of feeble non-assurance from sunny Senegal. And such bulletins they are. “PM urges quick resolution …” As VIA Rail shuts down, and his own deputy prime minister is denied entrance to the Halifax mayor’s office, the globe-trotter PM “urges quick resolution.”.........

Actually Justin is in the Caribbean now 'cuz it's February in Canada and the UN Security Council seat he thinks needs to be purchased, etc...but I've just read a report that leads me to think he might be coming back to Canada and heading to BC to take action on a situation out there that he's neglected far too long:http://www.onthesnow.com/british-columbia/skireport.html
 
DaSleeper
+3
#18
Will that mealy mouthed excuse for a prime minister be able to do anything?
His old man whom I didn't like too much would have done something by now....Just watch me!
 
taxslave
+5
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

I understand the sentiment but can't support the idea, Das. AB gets enough bad press. It doesn't need more and you can bet it will be all about AB and not a bunch of oil field workers if things go bad.
I've stopped watching the news. If I see one more journalist lead off with an interview from some 'whitey' manning a rail blockade in ON, I will completely lose it. Why aren't they interviewing all the FNs along the line who are just as pissed off about thugs and wanna be significant dolts on the blockades - and who are seeing shortages of goods and services due to the rail line blockades. Why aren't they out talking to the Canadians adversely affected by the rail stoppages? You know, the taxpaying Canadians who can't make it to their doctor's appointments? There was letter to the editor in the Sun today by the driver of a van that transports cancer patients for their treatments. Their appointments were cancelled because they couldn't get to the clinic in time. It isn't just about wanting to get to work.

Simple. They are following the orders from trudOWE. If they want to keep getting free taxpayers money they report as directed. Since even trudOWE was smart enough to know that it woiuld be political suicide to ban pipelines he is doing it by proxy.
 
Girth
+3
#20
Ottawa rejects calls to shut down rail blockades, will focus on negotiation



PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 16, 2020


LARS HAGBERG/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The federal government is ramping up its efforts to convince Indigenous communities to peacefully end a series of rail blockades, as Canadian National Railway Co. announced 1,000 temporary layoffs on Sunday, reflecting the growing economic impact of the protests.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Sunday cancelled a trip to the Caribbean to focus on the blockades and Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said that Ottawa doesn’t believe police intervention is the solution to anti-pipeline protests that have shut down much of the country’s rail system. Some premiers and the federal Conservative opposition had called on the government in recent days to take a hard line, enforce injunctions and remove protesters.

Businesses have warned of economic damage as trains typically carrying tens of thousands of commuters and billions of dollars worth of freight have been idled in railyards and sidings across the country since the blockades began on Feb. 6. CN sent out 450 of an estimated 1,000 temporary layoff notices on Sunday, spokesman Alexandre Boulé confirmed, as protests have shuttered much of the railway’s eastern Canadian network.

Late Sunday, federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau relaxed a ministerial order that had limited the speed of trains transporting combustible cargo such as crude oil. The order followed a fiery derailment in Saskatchewan in early February. CN said the change would allow it to increase the speed of its shipments in Western Canada, which would help compensate for the blockades in the east.

The protests have been spearheaded by groups opposed to the Coastal GasLink pipeline in northern British Columbia and the RCMP’s enforcement of injunctions to dislodge protesters who had been blocking construction of the $6.6-billion pipeline. All 20 elected First Nation councils along the natural gas pipeline’s route support the project, but a group of eight Wet’suwet’en hereditary house chiefs have led a vocal campaign to oppose the pipeline’s construction.

Crown Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett is expected to meet with Indigenous leaders in British Columbia on Monday. The Gitxsan First Nation temporarily took down a rail blockade near Hazelton, B.C., last week pending a proposed meeting with the minister, provincial officials and Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

Chantal Gagnon, a spokeswoman for the Prime Minister, said Mr. Trudeau has been in communication on the weekend with Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, Mr. Garneau and Ms. Bennett.

“Our priority remains the safety and security of all Canadians and the swift resolution of this issue to restore service across the rail system in accordance with the law,” she said in a statement.

Opinion: Every day rail blockade lasts, Trudeau’s stock drops lower

Mr. Miller, the Indigenous Services Minister, said the federal government has learned from two bloody police raids on First Nations encampments in recent decades, in Oka, Que., in 1990 and in Ipperwash, Ont., in 1995. More dialogue with Indigenous leaders and communities is the only solution to the continuing blockades, he said on Sunday.

“We have the experience of Oka 30 years ago where people went in with police and someone died. My question to Canadians, my questions to myself and to fellow politicians regardless of the party, is whether we do things the same old way and repeat the errors of the past, or do we take the time to do it right?” he said in an interview.

A blockade in the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory near Belleville, Ont., has stopped most traffic on CN’s rail network east of Winnipeg.

Via Rail said on Sunday that it has cancelled all trains across Canada, except for two secondary routes, until the end of Monday. More than 83,000 passengers have had their trips cancelled since the Ontario blockade started.

One of Montreal’s commuter lines has been shut down by a blockade in the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory outside the city. The provincial authority that operates the line said it is planning to run buses for commuters on Monday.

Smaller protests were also held on the weekend in Vancouver, Vaughan, Ont., and Niagara Falls, Ont.

Protesters at the Tyendinaga blockade declined to speak to media, including regarding Mr. Trudeau’s plans – except to say they believed it was unlikely that he would show up and speak to them in person.

Four Ontario Provincial Police officers hung back several hundred metres from the blockade Sunday, coming closer only for a brief check-in with the protesters in the late afternoon. “The dialogue is still open,” said Sergeant Cynthia Savard, the OPP’s regional community safety officer, in a phone interview. “It’s about keeping a peaceful, safe environment.”

Several dozen supporters arrived over the course of the day, delivering supplies including pizza, propane, firewood and Tim Hortons coffee. Some came from hundreds of kilometres away to share their support for the blockaders and the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, and share their fears over the natural gas pipeline in B.C.

“It’s our future that’s going to be destroyed – it’s really important for youth,” said Malika Gasbaoui, 17, who is Ojibwa-Métis and visited from the Laurentians in Quebec. Her mother, Anna, added that “a lot of people have been saying that the majority of native people, and non-native people in Canada, are for pipelines – which is not true. … The more these guys destroy, the less we’re going to have.”

Mike Salmon came with his family from Kitchener, Ont. to bring the protesters tarps, toilet paper and batteries. “I think it’s such a sign of the times that Canada’s been going through this wake-up call about reconciliation, and the whole planet is going through a wake-up call around climate change,” he said.

Kenneth Deer, the secretary of the Mohawk Nation at Kahnawake, said his community’s blockade has been supported by the local band council and he expects it will remain in place until the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs tell them to stand down. Kahnawake was one of the communities at the centre of the Oka crisis.

“They blocked highways and railroads during the Oka crisis. They helped us. Now the shoe is on the other foot and we’re going to help them,” said Mr. Deer. “This has to be dealt with over there, with the Wet’suwet’en. All of this is for them. This is not for Tyendinaga and not for Kahnawake.”

Last week, federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer called on police to enforce court orders and end the blockades, and criticized protesters as misguided activists who are damaging the economy and ignoring the wishes of elected First Nations leaders.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford said Sunday evening that he had urged Mr. Trudeau to focus on ending the blockades, calling it a “serious issue of national significance.”


source: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...-to-blockades/
 
Girth
+3
#21
There you have it ladies and gentleman. Justin Trudeau, a Prime Minister without testicles.
 
taxslave
+3
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Actually Justin is in the Caribbean now 'cuz it's February in Canada and the UN Security Council seat he thinks needs to be purchased, etc...but I've just read a report that leads me to think he might be coming back to Canada and heading to BC to take action on a situation out there that he's neglected far too long:http://www.onthesnow.com/british-columbia/skireport.html

Yeah we are way over budget on the Pacific Rim Park trail. We need him to bring another plane load of cash for this project is of the utmost importance to the national economy.
 
Mowich
+4
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Ottawa rejects calls to shut down rail blockades, will focus on negotiation



PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 16, 2020


LARS HAGBERG/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The federal government is ramping up its efforts to convince Indigenous communities to peacefully end a series of rail blockades, as Canadian National Railway Co. announced 1,000 temporary layoffs on Sunday, reflecting the growing economic impact of the protests.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Sunday cancelled a trip to the Caribbean to focus on the blockades and Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said that Ottawa doesn’t believe police intervention is the solution to anti-pipeline protests that have shut down much of the country’s rail system. Some premiers and the federal Conservative opposition had called on the government in recent days to take a hard line, enforce injunctions and remove protesters.

Businesses have warned of economic damage as trains typically carrying tens of thousands of commuters and billions of dollars worth of freight have been idled in railyards and sidings across the country since the blockades began on Feb. 6. CN sent out 450 of an estimated 1,000 temporary layoff notices on Sunday, spokesman Alexandre Boulé confirmed, as protests have shuttered much of the railway’s eastern Canadian network.

Late Sunday, federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau relaxed a ministerial order that had limited the speed of trains transporting combustible cargo such as crude oil. The order followed a fiery derailment in Saskatchewan in early February. CN said the change would allow it to increase the speed of its shipments in Western Canada, which would help compensate for the blockades in the east.

The protests have been spearheaded by groups opposed to the Coastal GasLink pipeline in northern British Columbia and the RCMP’s enforcement of injunctions to dislodge protesters who had been blocking construction of the $6.6-billion pipeline. All 20 elected First Nation councils along the natural gas pipeline’s route support the project, but a group of eight Wet’suwet’en hereditary house chiefs have led a vocal campaign to oppose the pipeline’s construction.

Crown Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett is expected to meet with Indigenous leaders in British Columbia on Monday. The Gitxsan First Nation temporarily took down a rail blockade near Hazelton, B.C., last week pending a proposed meeting with the minister, provincial officials and Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

Chantal Gagnon, a spokeswoman for the Prime Minister, said Mr. Trudeau has been in communication on the weekend with Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, Mr. Garneau and Ms. Bennett.

“Our priority remains the safety and security of all Canadians and the swift resolution of this issue to restore service across the rail system in accordance with the law,” she said in a statement.

Opinion: Every day rail blockade lasts, Trudeau’s stock drops lower

Mr. Miller, the Indigenous Services Minister, said the federal government has learned from two bloody police raids on First Nations encampments in recent decades, in Oka, Que., in 1990 and in Ipperwash, Ont., in 1995. More dialogue with Indigenous leaders and communities is the only solution to the continuing blockades, he said on Sunday.

“We have the experience of Oka 30 years ago where people went in with police and someone died. My question to Canadians, my questions to myself and to fellow politicians regardless of the party, is whether we do things the same old way and repeat the errors of the past, or do we take the time to do it right?” he said in an interview.

A blockade in the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory near Belleville, Ont., has stopped most traffic on CN’s rail network east of Winnipeg.

Via Rail said on Sunday that it has cancelled all trains across Canada, except for two secondary routes, until the end of Monday. More than 83,000 passengers have had their trips cancelled since the Ontario blockade started.

One of Montreal’s commuter lines has been shut down by a blockade in the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory outside the city. The provincial authority that operates the line said it is planning to run buses for commuters on Monday.

Smaller protests were also held on the weekend in Vancouver, Vaughan, Ont., and Niagara Falls, Ont.

Protesters at the Tyendinaga blockade declined to speak to media, including regarding Mr. Trudeau’s plans – except to say they believed it was unlikely that he would show up and speak to them in person.

Four Ontario Provincial Police officers hung back several hundred metres from the blockade Sunday, coming closer only for a brief check-in with the protesters in the late afternoon. “The dialogue is still open,” said Sergeant Cynthia Savard, the OPP’s regional community safety officer, in a phone interview. “It’s about keeping a peaceful, safe environment.”

Several dozen supporters arrived over the course of the day, delivering supplies including pizza, propane, firewood and Tim Hortons coffee. Some came from hundreds of kilometres away to share their support for the blockaders and the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, and share their fears over the natural gas pipeline in B.C.

“It’s our future that’s going to be destroyed – it’s really important for youth,” said Malika Gasbaoui, 17, who is Ojibwa-Métis and visited from the Laurentians in Quebec. Her mother, Anna, added that “a lot of people have been saying that the majority of native people, and non-native people in Canada, are for pipelines – which is not true. … The more these guys destroy, the less we’re going to have.”

Mike Salmon came with his family from Kitchener, Ont. to bring the protesters tarps, toilet paper and batteries. “I think it’s such a sign of the times that Canada’s been going through this wake-up call about reconciliation, and the whole planet is going through a wake-up call around climate change,” he said.

Kenneth Deer, the secretary of the Mohawk Nation at Kahnawake, said his community’s blockade has been supported by the local band council and he expects it will remain in place until the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs tell them to stand down. Kahnawake was one of the communities at the centre of the Oka crisis.

“They blocked highways and railroads during the Oka crisis. They helped us. Now the shoe is on the other foot and we’re going to help them,” said Mr. Deer. “This has to be dealt with over there, with the Wet’suwet’en. All of this is for them. This is not for Tyendinaga and not for Kahnawake.”

Last week, federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer called on police to enforce court orders and end the blockades, and criticized protesters as misguided activists who are damaging the economy and ignoring the wishes of elected First Nations leaders.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford said Sunday evening that he had urged Mr. Trudeau to focus on ending the blockades, calling it a “serious issue of national significance.”


source: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...-to-blockades/


So much for the little potato coming back to Canada. He might as well have stayed in the Caribbean for all the damn good his return has done. And, so much for the "I believe in the rule of law' bullshit he spouted while in Africa. If he did, the blockades would have come down today and the punks, thugs and mobs either jailed or told to get the **** home.
 
Mowich
+3
#24
Trudeau on the blockades: ‘We need to find a solution and we need to find it now’

OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pleaded for patience Tuesday in the face of ongoing blockades that have brought rail traffic to a grinding halt across the country.

(Patience my ass - Canadians have watched this unfolding crisis with little but as this ineffectual elite PM refused to come back to Canada and now he thinks we need to find a solution. The solution should have been found the minute the first illegal blockade went up.)

Trudeau spoke to the House of Commons Tuesday as rail blockades continue to prevent freight and passenger service in large parts of the country.

“Patience may be in short supply and that makes it more valuable than ever,” he said.

(May be? Get real you goof - patience is turning to anger and that is all the fault of your inability to give a shit about your country while in pursuit of some vainglorious goal of a seat on the UN Security Council.)

Trudeau’s ministers have been meeting with Indigenous leaders in an attempt to end the protests and allow rail traffic to resume. There are several court injunctions calling for the blockades to come to an end, but Trudeau did not outline a plan to have them enforced.

He said the Liberal government is trying to bring a peaceful resolution to the issue.

“Our government has been working on a path forward even as many have said we should give up.”

(Please ...........do tell us just who told you we should give up because if anyone did they had their collective heads up their collective asses.)

Trudeau said the protests this week were, in part, the end results of a long strained relationship with Indigenous people and Canadians across the country and would take broader work to resolve.

(The protests and blockades are a direct result of your inability to deal effectively with FN issues.)

“We cannot solve these problems on the margins. That is not the way forward.”

He said he did not want Canada to become a country where politicians order the police into action. He said it was important to resolve the broader issue.

(Canada already is a country that justly deals with such illegal blockades by sending in our RCMP - where the hell have you been?)

“Do we want to become a country of irreconcilable difference where people refuse to talk?”

(Canadian governments have been engaged in talks, consultations and meetings with the Indigenous for decades and little if anything has been solved due to the intransigent positions of some FNs who refuse to understand that the way forward is coming to terms with the benefits provided to their communities from agreements with companies that are more than willing to provide money and jobs for their communities.)

Trudeau asked the Indigenous groups to bring the blockades to an end and to work with the federal government to solve the broader concerns.

(Enough with the 'asking' you TELL them to take down the blockades now you spineless self-serving little twit.)

“Everyone has a stake in getting this right,” he said. “We need to find a solution and we need to find it now.”

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer was quick to denounce the Prime Minister’s comments, calling it the “weakest response to a national crisis.”

Scheer said it is time for the prime minister to act, to be more forceful in bringing the situation to an end.

“Nobody, and I mean nobody, has the right to hold our economy hostage.”

The protests were launched across the country in response to the RCMP’s arrest of protestors in Wet’suwet’en territory in northern British Columbia. The Mounties were enforcing a court injunction to end a protest that was blocking construction of the Coastal Gas natural gas pipeline.

Scheer pointed out that the Wet’suwet’en people broadly supported the project and it was a small group opposing the project.
“Standing between our country and prosperity is a small group of radical activists,” he said.

Scheer said it was the first shot in a continuing fight against resource projects with the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Teck Frontier mine the next targets.

“Will our country be one of the rule of law or one of the rule of the mob?”

( Well Andy, right now it most definitely is mob rule.)

Scheer’s response in the House of Commons came hours after the national chief of the Assembly of First Nations called for calm and constructive dialogue to ease tensions, the Canadian Press reported.

National Chief Perry Bellegarde told reporters in Ottawa that governments and industry have to give the time and space to work with the Wet’suwet’en people.

(Time and space have been given Bellegarde. Your own people are being denied goods and services because neither you nor the other chiefs have the guts to stand up to the illegal mobs on the blockades.)

Bellegarde said he has spoken with all parties involved to find a way forward.

“We say we want to de-escalate and we want dialogue,” he said.

“And I say our people are taking action because they want to see action — and when they see positive action by the key players, when they see a commitment to real dialogue to address this difficult situation, people will respond in a positive way.”

(Some of your people, Percy. I guess all those who disagree with your stance on this issue don't matter, do they.)

Other chiefs speaking alongside Bellegarde on Tuesday morning suggested it may be time to bring the situation to a peaceful conclusion and bring down the blockades.

nationalpost.com/news/politics/trudeau-on-the-blockades-we-need-to-find-a-solution-and-we-need-to-find-it-now
 
Mowich
+4
#25
Stephen LeDrew: Let's talk about the protests, but also take action

Comment Nation: All talk and no action is leaving Canada in a national stand-off

As anti-pipeline protests continue to block railways across the country, the Trudeau government must be doing more than just 'talking' - they need to be taking action and enforce the law.

Every single Canadian is being negatively impacted by the illegal protests against the approved gas pipeline in BC, and their supporters blocking the rail lines and bridges in Ontario, with no sign of a plan, or progress from our government - only as aspirational "peaceful solution."

The PM is now home from Europe and has cancelled plans to meet with Caribbean leaders at their conference in Barbados this week - but that said, Atlantic Canada is now in danger of running out of propane to heat their homes and businesses in a very cold winter and the economy is being strangled by the stoppage of trains.

And more - now bridges connecting Ontario with America are shutting down due to protests. Mayhem rules.

And no action out of Ottawa, except an insipid "we must talk."

Marc Miller, the Minister of Indigenous Services, has not set out any goals or strategy - he is "ready to talk again whenever they want."

Yes - talking is good, but we need a purposeful process with deadlines.

The actions of the protestors should be documented on video - for evidence in future lawsuits.

Legal action must be readied - those few hereditary chiefs supporting the protestors, and the protestors themselves, have supporters and assets - they must be faced with paying for the damage of their actions. It is a matter of responsibility under the law.

And if this small minority of Indigenous people rules over the majority, then Native governance must also be re-examined.
Resources must be deployed to assist this pursuit - Canada cannot afford another round like this.

Negotiations must narrow the issues, and at least start the process to resolve those issues. And the blockades must come down sometime soon as a symbol of good faith.

Otherwise, ultimately, the court-issued injunctions must be enforced if the blockades are not taken down - that is the task of the RCMP and OPP.

The duty of the police is to enforce the law and the law is a court-issued injunction.

No one wants to incite violence, or witness it on videos, but it is also important to understand that no one wants to freeze or run out of food - understanding the other guy's point of view an only extend so far.

The Trudeau government has been caught between its rhetoric on the Indigenous file and its failure to implement the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission - it has been five years since Trudeau made that promise; get over this present hump, then sack the failed ministers and get some competent people to resolve the long-standing issues.

Indigenous people in Canada deserve more than Trudeau's broken promises.

nationalpost.com/opinion/stephen-ledrew-lets-talk-about-the-protests-but-also-take-action


Stephen, I was with you right up to the point where you stated that the ministers should be fired. I suggest you attend some of the consultations that are held with certain FN groups as I did.

Years ago when the TRC came to our local reserve, I attended in order to get a better understanding of the TRC's mandate. Mistakenly, I had believed I was there to witness an orderly and timely discussion - wrong. The entire first hour was taken up by smudging, feather waving, dancing, drum beating and various chants. Another half hour was taken up by those needed to clean up after all the ceremony. For the next three and a half hours I listened as person after person ranted and railed about the historical wrongs, the white settlers, colonialism, lack of government help and numerous other issues that had little if anything to do with the commissions mandate which was to hear from the people themselves about their experiences in residential schools. Four times, people from the community who tried to tell their stories about how the schools actually helped them and provided an education from which they felt they had benefited were shut down and shown the door. By the end of the day, a bare handful of people had actually spoken about their experiences and many more were waiting to tell theirs. Instead of doing so, yet more chanting, feather waving, drum beating and dancing took place as the meetings were called to an end for the day.

To say I was rather disillusioned by what I had witnessed is an understatement yet I went back again the next day only to see time trickle away in useless ceremony, more colonialist rants and calls for hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given to the band though what those funds were for was never actually specified. In all I heard a handful of people actually tell their stories and they were heartbreaking, poignant and actually what we had come to witness.

I completely understand why Chief Clarence Louie insists that anyone wanting a meeting do it on his time and not 'indian time.' When Indigenous people finally get their head around the fact that time is precious and they have no right to stall talks with non-issues, ceremonies and all the accompanying clap-trap, they will finally see some action on the many problems facing their communities. Until that time, little if anything will be resolved.
 
pgs
+5
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Stephen LeDrew: Let's talk about the protests, but also take action

Comment Nation: All talk and no action is leaving Canada in a national stand-off

As anti-pipeline protests continue to block railways across the country, the Trudeau government must be doing more than just 'talking' - they need to be taking action and enforce the law.

Every single Canadian is being negatively impacted by the illegal protests against the approved gas pipeline in BC, and their supporters blocking the rail lines and bridges in Ontario, with no sign of a plan, or progress from our government - only as aspirational "peaceful solution."

The PM is now home from Europe and has cancelled plans to meet with Caribbean leaders at their conference in Barbados this week - but that said, Atlantic Canada is now in danger of running out of propane to heat their homes and businesses in a very cold winter and the economy is being strangled by the stoppage of trains.

And more - now bridges connecting Ontario with America are shutting down due to protests. Mayhem rules.

And no action out of Ottawa, except an insipid "we must talk."

Marc Miller, the Minister of Indigenous Services, has not set out any goals or strategy - he is "ready to talk again whenever they want."

Yes - talking is good, but we need a purposeful process with deadlines.

The actions of the protestors should be documented on video - for evidence in future lawsuits.

Legal action must be readied - those few hereditary chiefs supporting the protestors, and the protestors themselves, have supporters and assets - they must be faced with paying for the damage of their actions. It is a matter of responsibility under the law.

And if this small minority of Indigenous people rules over the majority, then Native governance must also be re-examined.
Resources must be deployed to assist this pursuit - Canada cannot afford another round like this.

Negotiations must narrow the issues, and at least start the process to resolve those issues. And the blockades must come down sometime soon as a symbol of good faith.

Otherwise, ultimately, the court-issued injunctions must be enforced if the blockades are not taken down - that is the task of the RCMP and OPP.

The duty of the police is to enforce the law and the law is a court-issued injunction.

No one wants to incite violence, or witness it on videos, but it is also important to understand that no one wants to freeze or run out of food - understanding the other guy's point of view an only extend so far.

The Trudeau government has been caught between its rhetoric on the Indigenous file and its failure to implement the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission - it has been five years since Trudeau made that promise; get over this present hump, then sack the failed ministers and get some competent people to resolve the long-standing issues.

Indigenous people in Canada deserve more than Trudeau's broken promises.

nationalpost.com/opinion/stephen-ledrew-lets-talk-about-the-protests-but-also-take-action


Stephen, I was with you right up to the point where you stated that the ministers should be fired. I suggest you attend some of the consultations that are held with certain FN groups as I did.

Years ago when the TRC came to our local reserve, I attended in order to get a better understanding of the TRC's mandate. Mistakenly, I had believed I was there to witness an orderly and timely discussion - wrong. The entire first hour was taken up by smudging, feather waving, dancing, drum beating and various chants. Another half hour was taken up by those needed to clean up after all the ceremony. For the next three and a half hours I listened as person after person ranted and railed about the historical wrongs, the white settlers, colonialism, lack of government help and numerous other issues that had little if anything to do with the commissions mandate which was to hear from the people themselves about their experiences in residential schools. Four times, people from the community who tried to tell their stories about how the schools actually helped them and provided an education from which they felt they had benefited were shut down and shown the door. By the end of the day, a bare handful of people had actually spoken about their experiences and many more were waiting to tell theirs. Instead of doing so, yet more chanting, feather waving, drum beating and dancing took place as the meetings were called to an end for the day.

To say I was rather disillusioned by what I had witnessed is an understatement yet I went back again the next day only to see time trickle away in useless ceremony, more colonialist rants and calls for hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given to the band though what those funds were for was never actually specified. In all I heard a handful of people actually tell their stories and they were heartbreaking, poignant and actually what we had come to witness.

I completely understand why Chief Clarence Louie insists that anyone wanting a meeting do it on his time and not 'indian time.' When Indigenous people finally get their head around the fact that time is precious and they have no right to stall talks with non-issues, ceremonies and all the accompanying clap-trap, they will finally see some action on the many problems facing their communities. Until that time, little if anything will be resolved.

Like my friend told me when the Nisga got their treaty , they will celebrate for two or three days and life will go back to normal. Chiefs will still be chiefs and Indians will still be Indians .
 
pgs
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Like my friend told me when the Nisga got their treaty , they will celebrate for two or three days and life will go back to normal. Chiefs will still be chiefs and Indians will still be Indians .

P.S. he is Nisga .
 
Hoid
#28
some of your best friends are Nisga's
 
Girth
+2
#29
Trudeau asks for patience as rail blockades continue, bars Scheer from leaders' meeting



Trudeau met with opposition leaders to discuss government response to protests — but didn't invite Scheer

John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: Feb 18, 2020 9:28 AM ET | Last Updated: 3 minutes ago
Addressing the House of Commons Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asked Canadians to be patient with his government as it seeks a negotiated end to Indigenous protests that have crippled the country's transportation network.
Trudeau said his government is committed to "dialogue" over the use of force with the Indigenous protesters who have shut down CN Rail in eastern Canada and much of Via Rail's services nationwide by blocking a key artery in southern Ontario.
Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said Trudeau's call for more talks with the protesters has emboldened "radical activists" who are intent on holding the Canadian economy hostage.

In a forceful response to Trudeau, Scheer said the prime minister's reluctance to use the police to stop the illegal blockades was akin to appeasement, a stance that privileges activists over "hard-working Canadians" and Indigenous people who support development.

Trudeau held a meeting with opposition leaders later Tuesday but didn't extend an invitation to Scheer. Speaking to reporters after the talks, Trudeau said Scheer's speech signalled he isn't willing to cooperate.

"Mr. Scheer disqualified himself from constructive discussions with his unacceptable speech earlier today," Trudeau said.



The blockade has been in place for 12 days and CN has been forced to shutter its network east of Toronto since Friday — a devastating development for businesspeople, commuters and farmers who rely on the railway for their livelihoods. The protesters from the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory say they are acting in solidarity with some of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs in B.C. who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline project running through their traditional territory.
"On all sides, people are upset and frustrated. I get it," Trudeau said. "It's understandable because this is about things that matter — rights and livelihoods, the rule of law and our democracy."
While the prime minister did not lay out a clear path forward in his speech, Trudeau seemed to be ruling out police intervention at this point in favour of more conversations with the protesters. He said the suggestion from the Conservative Opposition that Ottawa forcibly remove the protesters from camps along the CN tracks in Belleville, Ont. is "not helpful."

"Finding a solution will not be simple. It will take determination, hard work and co-operation," Trudeau said. "We are creating a space for peaceful honest dialogue with willing partners ... We need Canadians to show both resolve and collaboration. Everyone has a stake in getting this right."
An hours-long meeting between Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller and the Mohawk on Saturday failed to end the blockade. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett flew to B.C. Monday to meet with Wet'suwet'en and Gitxsan hereditary chiefs, but that meeting never actually took place.

Trudeau said that, for too long, the federal government has ignored Indigenous demands to solve lingering land and treaty disputes. He chastised Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer (without mentioning him by name) and other politicians he accused of pushing Ottawa to "act with haste and boil this down to slogans and ignore the complexities."
'Weakest response to a national crisis'
Scheer called Trudeau's address "the weakest response to a national crisis in Canadian history."

He said Trudeau's speech offered Canadians "a word salad" with no meaningful plan to restore rail service and end the illegal blockades that are hampering the country's economy.

"The prime minister's statement was a complete abdication of responsibility and leadership," Scheer said. "The prime minister has emboldened and encouraged this kind of behaviour."

Scheer said Trudeau is standing with activists who are determined to shut down the country's energy industry.
"Will our country be one of the rule of the law, or will our country be one of the rule of the mob?" Scheer asked.
On Friday, Scheer said the prime minister should direct the RCMP to remove the protesters. The Ontario Provincial Police are on hand in Tyendinaga but they have not yet enforced a court injunction that gives them the power to dismantle the protest camps and arrest those behind the blockade.

Trudeau had a meeting with Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Elizabeth May, the Green Party's parliamentary leader, in his office Tuesday to discuss the government's response to the ongoing blockades.
Scheer said Trudeau was using the meeting to distract from a "disastrous speech" that was void of any concrete plan to dismantle the blockades. He said the other opposition leaders were used as pawns by the Prime Minister's Office.

Singh said the meeting with the prime minister was "constructive" and Scheer should be denounced for the speech he delivered in the Commons. "I think what he said was reprehensible. What he said was divisive. It was purposely designed to pit some groups against another," Singh said.

During a news conference in Ottawa Tuesday morning, AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde said all the players — federal and provincial politicians, hereditary Wet'suwet'en chiefs and elected band officials — need to come to the table.
"It's on everybody. It's not on any one individual," he said. "I'm just calling on all the parties to come together, get this dialogue started in a constructive way."
Mohawk Council of Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Otsi Simon called on protesters to end the rail blockades as a "show of good faith."
"Bringing down the blockades doesn't mean that you surrender. It doesn't mean we're going to lay down and let them kick us around. No, it would show compassion," he said.
"I'm simply pleading with the protesters ... Have you made your point yet? Has the government and industry understood? I think they did."
Business groups were calling on the federal government Tuesday to take steps to immediately restore full rail service.

Dennis Darby, CEO of Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters, said the situation is "beyond serious."

The group estimates that goods worth about $425 million are being stranded every day the blockade continues — and it will take three to four days of work to recover from a single day of disruption.

Bob Masterson, president and CEO of the Chemistry Industry Association of Canada, said a prolonged shutdown inevitably would lead to shortages of his industry's products, such as jet fuel for planes, propane for home heating and chlorine for drinking water.

Protesters with the Mohawks of Tyendinaga have been stationed beside the tracks near Belleville, Ont., since Feb. 6 to protest the RCMP's raids in Wet'suwet'en territory in northern B.C.
Ottawa committed to quick, peaceful resolution to cross-country pipeline protests: Trudeau
Via Rail announced Tuesday that all trains running between Toronto and Windsor, Toronto and Sarnia and on the Toronto-Niagara route will resume operating as of Thursday morning. Partial service is also set to resume between Quebec City, Montreal and Ottawa beginning Thursday, the operator said.
Almost all other Via Rail services remain cancelled, with the exception of Sudbury-White River and Churchill-The Pas, until further notice.
Via says the partial resumption of service between Ottawa and Quebec City follows a notification received from Canadian National Railway.
source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/tru...ouse-1.5466878
Last edited by Girth; 4 days ago at 06:46 PM..
 
Girth
+3
#30
Trudeau is taking a page from China, in excluding all dissenting voices that are critical to his inaction to do anything to resolve this issues. While the NDP, Bloc Quebecois, and Green Party directed what can only be called as "softball questions," Scheer took Trudeau to task, and with the backing of the majority of Canadians, demanded to know why Trudeau has not resolved this issue.

Then again, Trudeau just spent time in Iran, cozing up to some of their leaders, who shot down a commercial jet, carrying dozens of Canadians. Trudeau is clearly not fit for the role of leader of our nation.