Rowan Atkinson's son joins the Gurkhas


Blackleaf
+1
#1
Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal.

Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army.

The 26-year-old son of Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62, will have to learn Nepalese in his new role as a Gurkha officer.

Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son Ben, 26, joins the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal


Lt Ben Atkinson has joined the Gurkhas soldiers after spending months in Nepal

He is the son of Rowan Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62

Gurjha Brigade Assoc. newsletter hints he is intent on charming local women

By Susie Coen For The Daily Mail and Sophie Tanno For Mailonline
19 October 2019

Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal.

Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army.

The 26-year-old son of Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62, will have to learn Nepalese in his new role as a Gurkha officer.


Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son Lt Ben Atkinson (right) has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal



Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army


The Gurjha Brigade Association newsletter hinted he is intent on charming local women, saying: 'Lt Atkinson grasped the language remarkably quickly.

'This may be attributed either to his language experience, having studied both Arabic and Spanish previously, or to his urgent requirement to learn the local Nepalese 'chat-up' lines.'

The letter, quoted in The Sun, added: 'Learning Nepalese dance moves was a personal priority and Lt Atkinson was quick to establish an impressive 'uthyo basyo' (an up-down rapid squatting dance-move).'


Comedian Rowan Atkinson pictured with former wife, Sunetra Sastry in 2005

Exeter University graduate Lt Atkinson, whose actor father is worth around £90million, provided a guard of honour last year for Emmanuel Macron and Theresa May at Sandhurst.

His father played Edmund Blackadder in all four series of the comedy – which was ranked second in a BBC poll of Britain’s greatest sitcoms.

The Gurkhas: Part of the British Army for over 200 years



The Gurkhas are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent that are recruited for the British and Indian armies.

They have been part of the British Army for over 200 years.

In 1814 the British East India Company suffered heavy casualties when it tried to invade Nepal. Ultimately, it signed a peace deal a year later which allowed them to recruit members from the ranks of their former enemies, which laid the foundations for the Gurkha Brigade.

Additionally, an agreement between Nepal, India and Britain in 1947 after the partition of India, meant that four Gurkha regiments were transferred to the British.

Around 200,000 Gurkhas fought in the world wars and in more recent times have also been deployed in the Falklands, Iraq and Afghanistan.

Most performed infantry roles, many are engineers, logisticians and signals specialists.

At their peak the force stood at around 112,000 men but now their numbers are only around 3,500.

The selection process to become a Gurkha is said to be one of the toughest in the world. Each year 28,000 hopefuls battle it out for one of the 200 places.

They are now also a UN peacekeeping force in war zones around the world.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ths-Nepal.html
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal.
Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army.
The 26-year-old son of Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62, will have to learn Nepalese in his new role as a Gurkha officer.
Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son Ben, 26, joins the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal


Lt Ben Atkinson has joined the Gurkhas soldiers after spending months in Nepal

He is the son of Rowan Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62

Gurjha Brigade Assoc. newsletter hints he is intent on charming local women
By Susie Coen For The Daily Mail and Sophie Tanno For Mailonline
19 October 2019
Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal.
Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army.
The 26-year-old son of Atkinson, 64, and make-up artist Sunetra Sastry, 62, will have to learn Nepalese in his new role as a Gurkha officer.

Rowan Atkinson's lookalike son Lt Ben Atkinson (right) has joined the Gurkhas after spending three months in Nepal


Lt Ben Atkinson was put through a 10 week course and taught about the local culture to join the unique unit of the British Army

The Gurjha Brigade Association newsletter hinted he is intent on charming local women, saying: 'Lt Atkinson grasped the language remarkably quickly.
'This may be attributed either to his language experience, having studied both Arabic and Spanish previously, or to his urgent requirement to learn the local Nepalese 'chat-up' lines.'
The letter, quoted in The Sun, added: 'Learning Nepalese dance moves was a personal priority and Lt Atkinson was quick to establish an impressive 'uthyo basyo' (an up-down rapid squatting dance-move).'

Comedian Rowan Atkinson pictured with former wife, Sunetra Sastry in 2005

Exeter University graduate Lt Atkinson, whose actor father is worth around £90million, provided a guard of honour last year for Emmanuel Macron and Theresa May at Sandhurst.
His father played Edmund Blackadder in all four series of the comedy – which was ranked second in a BBC poll of Britain’s greatest sitcoms.
The Gurkhas: Part of the British Army for over 200 years

The Gurkhas are soldiers native to the Indian subcontinent that are recruited for the British and Indian armies.
They have been part of the British Army for over 200 years.
In 1814 the British East India Company suffered heavy casualties when it tried to invade Nepal. Ultimately, it signed a peace deal a year later which allowed them to recruit members from the ranks of their former enemies, which laid the foundations for the Gurkha Brigade.
Additionally, an agreement between Nepal, India and Britain in 1947 after the partition of India, meant that four Gurkha regiments were transferred to the British.
Around 200,000 Gurkhas fought in the world wars and in more recent times have also been deployed in the Falklands, Iraq and Afghanistan.
Most performed infantry roles, many are engineers, logisticians and signals specialists.
At their peak the force stood at around 112,000 men but now their numbers are only around 3,500.
The selection process to become a Gurkha is said to be one of the toughest in the world. Each year 28,000 hopefuls battle it out for one of the 200 places.
They are now also a UN peacekeeping force in war zones around the world.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ths-Nepal.html

Top notch fighters ..
 
Danbones
+1
#3
Ah yes, get the monkeys in the colonies to do the dirty work we will just write the propaganda and take the credit.

LOL,Yorgie.
 
AnnaEmber
+2
#4  Top Rated Post
Good for him.
"Celebrity is news. Everything else is entertainment". - M. McLuhan (For most people anyways. It's funny. Also, most people worship their heroes like gods, but they're just people. So one should never meet their heroes unless they expect to learn that their heroes are just people, too. There's a similar quote that I think, originated from Louisa May Alcott: "The youngest, aged twelve, could not conceal her disappointment, and turned away, feeling as so many of us have felt when we discover that our idols are very ordinary men and women").
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Ah yes, get the monkeys in the colonies to do the dirty work we will just write the propaganda and take the credit.

LOL,Yorgie.

Doesn't the Canadian Army allow Commonwealth citizens to join?

Nepal isn't part of the Commonwealth, but it's the same principle.
 
Danbones
#6
I have a friend who has been cleaning the toilets at the homeless shelter while he is a retired millionaire for two years.
( almost NO one there knows he is worth that much money, it's a bit of a secret to prevent complications)

Some heroes are better then their reputation would have you believe.
 
Curious Cdn
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Doesn't the Canadian Army allow Commonwealth citizens to join?
Nepal isn't part of the Commonwealth, but it's the same principle.

Canadians serve in the Brit Armed Forces and Brits serve in the Canadian Armed Forces. I had two ex-RN COs. One was an ex-submariner commanding a small minesweeper sized vessel over here (YIKES!)

Good sort, though.

By the way, citizens of anywhere can join the Canadian Forces and we've had Americans come up here to join by the tens of thousands, twice in our history.
 
MHz
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Top notch fighters ..

. . . in only 10 weeks too.
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Canadians serve in the Brit Armed Forces and Brits serve in the Canadian Armed Forces. I had two ex-RN COs. One was an ex-submariner commanding a small minesweeper sized vessel over here (YIKES!)
Good sort, though.
By the way, citizens of anywhere can join the Canadian Forces and we've had Americans come up here to join by the tens of thousands, twice in our history.

In fact, I've just checked and it seems only Canadian citizens can join the Canadian Army. You also have to be at least 18.

You have to be a British, Irish or Commonwealth citizen to join the British Army - the exception is the Gurkhas who are none of the above initially - and you have to be at least 16.

Around 28,000 Gurkha youths compete for just 200 places in the British Army each year. To qualify they must be able to do 75 bench jumps in one minute and 70 sit-ups in two minutes. Then they participate in the world's most arduous military selection test, the doko - running 5km up a steep track in the foothills of the Himalayas, carrying 25kg of rocks on their back, in less than 55 minutes.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#10
Ben's father was in the British Army, too. He faced the firing squad and did so in a very stoically and black-humoured British sort of way:


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3WHSkbM9zAU
Last edited by Blackleaf; 4 weeks ago at 08:57 PM..
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#11
I'm sure he'll be an excellent gherkin.
 
Curious Cdn
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I'm sure he'll be an excellent gherkin.

I eye-dill-eyes the guy. You need to be commanded by an English Gentleman when you're in a pickle.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I eye-dill-eyes the guy. You need to be commanded by an English Gentleman when you're in a pickle.

He relishes the opportunity. If the story's kosher, that is.
 
Curious Cdn
#14
The Duke of Cucumberland's Fencibles are pretty sour about him mustarding with the gherkins, instead.
 
Blackleaf
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I'm sure he'll be an excellent gherkin.

You wouldn't call them that to their faces.
 
Cannuck
#16
I would. They aren’t snowflakes
 
Curious Cdn
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

You wouldn't call them that to their faces.

Do they wear Pickelhauben on their heads?
 
Wise
#18
Learned Nepalese - that's genius. It is probably not at all comical.