Virginia governor apologizes for racist imagery in med school yearbook


spaminator
+1
#1
Virginia governor apologizes for racist imagery in med school yearbook
Associated Press
Published:
February 1, 2019
Updated:
February 1, 2019 11:59 PM EST
In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks to a crowd during a Women's Rights rally at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam apologized on Friday for a racist photo in which he appeared more than 30 years ago, but said he did not intend to heed calls to resign from both Republicans and prominent fellow Democrats, including several presidential hopefuls.
The yearbook images were first published Friday by the conservative news outlet Big League Politics. The Virginian-Pilot later obtained a copy from Eastern Virginia Medical School, which Northam attended. The photo shows two people looking at the camera — one in blackface wearing a hat, bow tie and plaid pants; the other in a full Ku Klux Klan robe.
An Associated Press reporter saw the yearbook page and confirmed its authenticity at the medical school.
In his first apology, issued in a written statement Friday night, Northam called the costume he wore “clearly racist and offensive,” but he didn’t say which one he had worn.
He later issued a video statement saying he was “deeply sorry” but still committed to serving the “remainder of my term.”
“I accept responsibility for my past actions and I am ready to do the hard work of regaining your trust,” Northam said.
This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. (Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP)
Northam’s political viability hinges on whether he can maintain support among the state’s black pastors, officials and state lawmakers, many of whom have long personal relationships with the governor since he first ran for state Senate in 2007.
The Virginia Legislative Black Caucus issued a statement late Friday saying “we feel complete betrayal” and are “still processing” the pictures.
“What has been revealed is disgusting, reprehensible and offensive,” the statement said.
Others said there was no question he should step down. Among them: Democratic presidential hopefuls Cory Booker, Julian Castro, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren; newly elected Democratic U.S. Reps. Elaine Luria and Abigail Spanberger of Virginia; the NAACP and Planned Parenthood.
State Sen. Louise Lucas of Portsmouth, a close ally of Northam and longtime African-American lawmaker, described a hastily called conference call with black leaders around the state as “intense,” her voice breaking, but did not elaborate.
Northam spent years actively courting the black community in the lead up to his 2017 gubernatorial run, building relationships that helped him win both the primary and the general election. He’s a member of a predominantly black church on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, where he grew up.
“It’s a matter of relationships and trust. That’s not something that you build overnight,” Northam told the AP during a 2017 campaign stop while describing his relationship with the black community.
Northam, a folksy pediatric neurologist who is personal friends with many GOP lawmakers, has recently come under fire from Republicans who have accused him of backing infanticide after he said he supported a bill loosening restrictions on late-term abortions.
Last week, Florida’s secretary of state resigned after photos from a 2005 Halloween party showed him in blackface while dressed as a Hurricane Katrina victim.

http://torontosun.com/news/world/vir...chool-yearbook
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1 / -1
#2
Well, if he switches party to Republican, he'll be fine.
 
spaminator
+1
#3
Virginia Gov. Northam 'convinced' that wasn’t him in racist yearbook photo
Associated Press
Published:
February 2, 2019
Updated:
February 2, 2019 11:14 PM EST
RICHMOND, Va. — Resisting widespread calls for his resignation, Virginia’s embattled governor on Saturday vowed to remain in office after disavowing a blatantly racist photograph that appeared under his name in his 1984 medical school yearbook.
In a tumultuous 24 hours, Gov. Ralph Northam posted a video on Twitter on Friday apologizing for the photograph that featured what appeared to be a man in blackface and a second person cloaked in Klu Klux Klan garb. He said that he could not “undo the harm my behaviour caused then and today.”
But by Saturday, he said he was not in the photo and had apologized a day earlier for “content” that was on his profile page in the yearbook. The governor said he had not seen the photo before Friday, since he had not purchased the commemorative book or been involved in its preparation more than three decades ago.
“It has taken time for me to make sure that it’s not me, but I am convinced, I am convinced that I am not in that picture,” he told reporters gathered at the Executive Mansion in Richmond, calling the shot offensive and horrific.
Virginia governor apologizes for racist imagery in med school yearbook
Florida elections chief resigns after photos of him in blackface emerge
Ex-University of Okla. students apologize for racist blackface video
Prada pulls luxury trinkets over blackface controversy
While talking with reporters, Northam disclosed that he once had used shoe polish to darken his face as part of a Michael Jackson costume he fashioned for a 1984 dance contest in Texas when he was in the U.S. Army. Northam said he regrets that he didn’t understand “the harmful legacy of an action like that.”
His refusal to step down could signal a potentially long and bruising fight between Northam and his former supporters.
Shortly after he spoke, Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez issued a statement calling on the governor to step aside. Since Friday, groups calling for his resignation included the Virginia Democratic Party and the state House Democratic Caucus. Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring and top Republicans in the Virginia General Assembly also urged him to resign, as have many declared and potential Democratic presidential candidates.
“His past and recent actions have led to pain and a loss of trust with Virginians. He is no longer the best person to lead our state,” the Virginia Senate Democratic Caucus said in a statement.
Demonstrators hold signs and chant outside the Governors office at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Steve Helber / AP
If Northam does resign, Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax would become the second African-American governor in the state’s history.
In a statement, Fairfax said the state needs leaders who can unite people, but he stopped short of calling for Northam’s departure. Referring to Northam, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax said he “cannot condone actions from his past” that at least “suggest a comfort with Virginia’s darker history of white supremacy, racial stereotyping and intimidation.”
Northam conceded Saturday that people might have difficulty believing his shifting statements.
Northam was pushed repeatedly by reporters to explain why he issued an apology Friday if he wasn’t in the photograph.
“My first intention … was to reach out and apologize,” he said, adding that he recognized that people would be offended by the photo. But after studying the picture and consulting with classmates, “I am convinced that is not my picture.”
This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP
Walt Broadnax, one of two black students who graduated from Eastern Virginia Medical School with Northam, said by phone Saturday he also didn’t buy the class’s 1984 yearbook or see it until decades after it was published.
Broadnax defended his former classmate and said he’s not a racist, adding that the school would not have tolerated someone going to a party in blackface.
It remained unclear whether Northam’s remarks would calm the torrent of criticism that threatens to undermine his administration.
The yearbook images were first published Friday afternoon by the conservative news outlet Big League Politics. An Associated Press reporter later saw the yearbook page and confirmed its authenticity at the medical school.
In an initial apology about the photograph on Friday, Northam called the costume he wore “clearly racist and offensive,” but he didn’t say which one he had worn.
He later issued a video statement saying he was “deeply sorry” but still committed to serving the “remainder of my term.”
Demonstrators hold signs and chant outside the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Steve Helber / AP
“I accept responsibility for my past actions and I am ready to do the hard work of regaining your trust,” said Northam, whose term is set to end in 2022.
The scars from centuries of racial oppression are still raw in a state that was once home to the capital of the Confederacy.
Virginians continue to struggle with the state’s legacy of slavery, Jim Crow and Massive Resistance, the anti-school segregation push. Heated debates about the Confederate statues are ongoing after a deadly 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. A state holiday honouring Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson is a perennial source of discontent.
Northam spent years actively courting the black community in the lead-up to his 2017 gubernatorial run, building relationships that helped him win both the primary and the general election. He’s a member of a predominantly black church on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, where he grew up.
“It’s a matter of relationships and trust. That’s not something that you build overnight,” Northam told the AP during a 2017 campaign stop while describing his relationship with the black community.
Northam, a folksy pediatric neurologist who is personal friends with many GOP lawmakers, has recently come under fire from Republicans who have accused him of backing infanticide after he said he supported a bill loosening restrictions on late-term abortions.
Last week, Florida’s secretary of state resigned after photos from a 2005 Halloween party showed him in blackface while dressed as a Hurricane Katrina victim.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=sKOep8Zyt6Y
http://torontosun.com/news/world/vir...d-for-democrat
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
+3
#4  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Well, if he switches party to Republican, he'll be fine.

This two bit racist, just like you are, is a SLAVE PARTY DEMOCRAT, and he is NOT going to resign.

that sucks doood.

He apologized, but now he claims it wasn't him, so CERTAINLY he is a liar.
( he'll be fine if he is a lawyer.)

After what you slave partyers have put people like Kavanaugh, and Rosanne Barr through, You KKK wieners are just too much.

...and that's not even talking about the newest fakenews event, the fake attack on Jussie Smollet. (After multiple changes to his story, NO collaborating security camera footage, now he won't give up his phone so police can check to see if he is telling the truth...because AS is the S.O.P. with you slavers, he isn't)



Do you cross over and do (trade in, LOL ) used camels too?
Last edited by Danbones; Feb 3rd, 2019 at 10:01 AM..
 
Walter
+2
#5
Senator Robert Byrd would be proud.
 
EagleSmack
+3
#6
Just Democrats being Democrats.
 
EagleSmack
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

This two bit racist, just like you are, is a SLAVE PARTY DEMOCRAT, and he is NOT going to resign.

that sucks doood.


Of course he's not going to resign. Democrats have always been the party of the KKK.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Of course he's not going to resign. Democrats have always been the party of the KKK.

But that was before .
 
spaminator
#9
Northam blackface scandal spotlights deeply embedded racism in U.S.
Associated Press
Published:
February 3, 2019
Updated:
February 3, 2019 8:19 PM EST
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, accompanied by his wife, Pam, speaks during a news conference in the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, Va., on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
RICHMOND, Va. — Gov. Ralph Northam clung to office Sunday amid nearly unanimous calls from his own party to resign over a racist photo in his 1984 medical school yearbook, going silent after a bizarre 24 hours in which he first admitted he was in the picture, then denied it.
The Democrat’s stunning about-face — at a weekend news conference where he also acknowledged putting on blackface for a dance contest decades ago and appeared to briefly entertain the notion of doing the Michael Jackson moonwalk for reporters — only seemed to make things worse.
The chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus declared that Northam “still does not understand the seriousness of his actions.” The photo shows someone in blackface and another person in a Ku Klux Klan hood and robe.
“I think he’s been completely dishonest and disingenuous,” Rep. Karen Bass, D-California, said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” ”He knew this picture was there, and he could’ve come clean and talked to African-Americans that he’s close to decades ago.“
Northam worshipped at his home church, the predominantly black First Baptist in Capeville, but otherwise kept out of sight on Sunday as calls intensified for him to step down.
This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. The page shows a picture, at right, of a person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood next to different pictures of the governor. Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP
Even if Northam doesn’t resign, the scandal threatens to cripple his ability to govern. He has lost the support of virtually all of the state’s Democratic establishment. Top Republicans in the Virginia General Assembly also urged Northam to step down, as did many declared and potential Democratic presidential candidates.
Virginia governors can be removed for “malfeasance in office, corruption, neglect of duty, or other high crime or misdemeanour” under the state constitution, but top Democrats said they don’t believe it will come to that.
Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe predicted that Northam — who served as McAuliffe’s lieutenant governor — will eventually leave office.
“Ralph will do the right thing for the Commonwealth of Virginia,” McAuliffe said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.”
Northam apologized on Friday for appearing in the photograph on his yearbook page. He did not say which costume he was wearing, but said he was “deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo.” On Saturday, though, the governor reversed course and said the picture “is definitely not me.”
While talking with reporters, Northam admitted he once used shoe polish to put on blackface as part of a Michael Jackson costume for a 1984 dance contest in Texas, when he was in the Army. Northam said he regrets that he didn’t understand “the harmful legacy of an action like that.”
Asked by a reporter if he could still do Jackson’s famous moonwalk, Northam looked at the floor as if thinking about demonstrating it. His wife put a stop to it, telling him, “Inappropriate circumstances.”
His shifting explanations did little or nothing to sway prominent Democrats who had swiftly disowned him.
Both of Virginia’s U.S. senators, Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, joined the dean of Virginia’s congressional delegation, Rep. Bobby Scott, in saying they no longer believe Northam can serve effectively. James Ryan, president of the University of Virginia, said in a statement that it would be “exceedingly difficult” for Northam to continue serving.
If Northam does resign, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax would become the second African-American governor in the state’s history. He stopped short of calling for Northam’s departure but said he “cannot condone actions” from Northam’s past that “suggest a comfort with Virginia’s darker history of white supremacy, racial stereotyping and intimidation.”
McAuliffe faulted Northam’s handling of the furor.
“If it wasn’t him in the photo, he should’ve said that on Friday,” McAuliffe said. “Instinctively, you know if you put black paint on your face. You know if you put a hood on. And so if it isn’t you, you come out immediately and say, ’This is not me.”’
Ultimately, McAuliffe said, “It doesn’t matter whether he was in the photo or not in the photo at this point. We have to close that chapter. We have to move Virginia forward.”
One of the few voices backing Northam on Sunday was former Virginia Rep. Jim Moran, a Democrat who served in Congress from 1991 to 2015.
Moran told ABC’s “This Week” that Northam’s record — including his support of Medicaid expansion and of public schools in minority neighbourhoods — shows that the embattled governor is a friend of African-Americans and that he should ride out the storm.
“I think it is a rush to judgment before we know all of the facts and before we’ve considered all of the consequences,” said Moran, who is white. “I don’t think these public shamings really get us all that much.”
Northam, a pediatric neurologist who came to politics late in life, spent years courting the black community in the run-up to his 2017 race for governor.
He recently came under fire from Republicans who have accused him of backing infanticide after he said he supported a bill loosening restrictions on late-term abortions.
Late last month, Florida’s secretary of state resigned after photos from a 2005 Halloween party showed him in blackface while dressed as a Hurricane Katrina victim.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=sKOep8Zyt6Y
http://torontosun.com/news/world/nor...-racism-in-u-s
 
spaminator
#10
Virginia governor Ralph Northam weighs his future days after racist photo surfaces
Associated Press
Published:
February 4, 2019
Updated:
February 4, 2019 8:52 PM EST
Demonstrators hold signs and chant outside the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019.Steve Helber / AP Photo
RICHMOND, Va. — A political death watch took shape at Virginia’s Capitol as Gov. Ralph Northam consulted with top administration officials Monday about whether to resign amid a furor over a racist photo in his 1984 yearbook.
Practically all of the state’s Democratic establishment — and Republican leaders, too — turned against the 59-year-old Democrat after the picture surfaced late last week of someone in blackface next to another person in a Ku Klux Klan hood and robe. The photo was on Northam’s medical school yearbook page.
The sense of crisis deepened Monday as the politician next in line to be governor, Democratic Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, denied an uncorroborated allegation of sexual misconduct first reported by a conservative website. Fairfax told reporters that the 2004 encounter with a woman was consensual, and he called the accusation a political “smear.”
Protest chants, meanwhile, echoed around Capitol Square. Lobbyists complained they were unable to get legislators to focus on bills. Security guards joked about who was going to be the next governor. Cafeteria workers and members of the cleaning staff shook their heads in wonder. And banks of news cameras were set up outside the governor’s Executive Mansion.
Northam stayed out of sight as he met with his Cabinet and senior staff to hear their assessment of whether it was feasible for him to stay in office, according to a top administration official who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The meetings included frank conversations about the difficulties of governing under such circumstances, the person said.
Calls from lawmakers for Northam’s resignation seemed to ease Monday. State Del. Lamont Bagby, head of the Legislative Black Caucus, said there was little left to say: “I’m going to let him breathe a little bit, give him space to make the right decision.”
The waiting game played out on what was already one of the legislature’s busiest days of the session, with the House and Senate each seeking to complete legislation to send to the other chamber.
Finance Secretary Aubrey Layne said he told Northam that the state cannot afford a prolonged period of uncertainty over his future. Northam’s office is in the middle of negotiations with GOP lawmakers over a major tax overhaul and changes to the state budget. The Republicans control both houses of the legislature.
“One way or the other, it needs to be resolved,” Layne said.
The furor over the photo erupted on Friday, when Northam first admitted he was in the picture without saying which costume he was wearing, and apologized. But a day later, he denied he was in the photo, while also acknowledging he once put on blackface to imitate Michael Jackson at a dance contest in Texas decades ago.
The scandal threatens to cripple Northam’s ability to govern. In a sign Monday of the challenges he could face, Katherine Rowe, president of the College of William & Mary, cancelled an appearance by Northam at an event this Friday because his presence would “fundamentally disrupt the sense of campus unity we aspire to.”
Northam, a pediatric neurologist who graduated from Eastern Virginia Medical School and came to politics late in life, is one year into his four-year term. If he resigns, Fairfax will become the second African-American governor in Virginia history.
The state’s Republican House speaker said lawmakers are hesitant to seek Northam’s impeachment and are hoping he steps down instead.
“Obviously on impeachment, that’s a very high standard,” Speaker Kirk Cox said. “And so I think that’s why I think we have called for the resignation. We hope that’s what the governor does. I think that would obviously be less pain for everyone.”
Referring to the allegation against him, Fairfax said he was not surprised it came at a critical time: “It’s at that point that they come out with the attacks and the smears. It is unfortunate. It really is, but it’s sadly a part of our politics now.”
The Associated Press is not reporting the details of the accusation because AP has not been able to corroborate it. The Washington Post said Monday that it was approached by the woman in 2017 and carefully investigated but never published a story for lack of any independent evidence. The Post said the woman had not told anyone about it, the account could not be corroborated, Fairfax denied it, and the Post was unable to find other similar allegations against him among people who knew him in college, law school or in politics.
The woman did not immediately respond Monday to a voicemail, text message or email from an AP reporter.
The allegations were first reported by Big League Politics, the news outlet that first published the yearbook image.
Last week, Northam came under fire from Republicans who have accused him of backing infanticide after he said he supported a bill loosening restrictions on late-term abortions.
Late last month, Florida’s secretary of state resigned after photos surfaced of him in blackface as a Hurricane Katrina victim at a 2005 Halloween party.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/vir...photo-surfaces
 
Hoid
#11
That fact that this picture ended up in a yearbook pretty much indicates that this was seen as a normal thing at this time and place.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

That fact that this picture ended up in a yearbook pretty much indicates that this was seen as a normal thing at this time and place.

Virginia in '84? You bet.

Doesn't change the fact that Northam's public statements amount to "I apologize for the picture that's not me while admitting to wearing blackface years after I have declared that I was "woke," but I was to young and irresponsible for the doctor I was about to become."
 
Hoid
#13
Not just Virginia but Med schools in general always had a reputation for putting on culturally insensitive grad shows.
 
EagleSmack
+2
#14
It is quite normal for a Democrat and Liberal to wear a KKK outfit. It always has been, then and now.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#15
And Now Virginia's Democratic Lt. Gov Has Been Accused of Sexual Assault
 
coldstream
+2
#16
Frankly I think this is all part of the 'gotcha' culture that pervades modern media and politics.

I'd hate to think every case of bad judgement and stupidity I made in my twenties would be exposed and deemed to be the only and final measure of my character 30 years later. Without any recourse to my record, opinions and actions in the interim. It's really nonsense.

My problem with Gov. Northam does not come from some ill considered college prank. It comes from his statements surrounding a new Virginia abortion law, which calls for murdering post-partum infants who have survived an abortion. He went of radio to propose that they should be kept alive until the mother and doctors decide whether to kill the baby or not. What that means is Northam in morally insane, and unfit for executive office.
Last edited by coldstream; Feb 6th, 2019 at 01:37 PM..
 
EagleSmack
+3
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post



My problem with Gov. Northam does not come from some ill considered college prank. It comes from his statements surrounding a new Virginia abortion law, which calls for murdering post-partum infants who have survived an abortion. He went of radio to propose that they should be kept alive until the mother and doctors decide whether to kill the baby or not. What that means is Northam in morally insane, and unfit for executive office.


It is a little more sinister than "surviving" an abortion. His words go far beyond what you described. Not my words... his words.


Pro Choice... alright... but after a baby being born, keep it comfortable, then the mother have a discussion with the Doctor on what the next steps should be if it is not wanted.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
+1
#18
Virginia attorney general admits to wearing blackface
by Lynde Langdon
Posted 2/06/19, 01:40 pm
The political crisis in Virginia worsened Wednesday when state Attorney General Mark Herring admitted he once wore blackface to a party in college. Herring is second in line for the governorship behind Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, who was recently accused of sexual assault, and embattled Gov. Ralph Northam. All three are Democrats.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixzDME8zjKs


How the frick do I post an implosion meme?


ah...here we go!




PS I was born at 7 months, I find the idea of late term abortions abhorrent to say the least.


(...and yes Hoid, I AM Mooning you!)
Last edited by Danbones; Feb 6th, 2019 at 02:14 PM..
 
EagleSmack
+1
#19
No wonder Virginia is going Blue.
 
Walter
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

It is a little more sinister than "surviving" an abortion. His words go far beyond what you described. Not my words... his words.
Pro Choice... alright... but after a baby being born, keep it comfortable, then the mother have a discussion with the Doctor on what the next steps should be if it is not wanted.

It’s called murder.
 
Hoid
+1
#21
Yes we all know the White Natty dictionary

abortion = murder

immigrant = refugee

muslim = terrorist

liberal = communist

racist = patriot

etc etc etc
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Yes we all know the White Natty dictionary

abortion = murder

immigrant = refugee

muslim = terrorist

liberal = communist

racist = patriot

etc etc etc

Are all Icelandic people like that ? Who would have known .
 
Walter
#23
Justice Hugo Black would be proud.
 
spaminator
#24
BLACKFACE, KKK OUTFIT AND ALLEGED SEX ASSAULT: Top 3 Democrats under fire in Virginia
Associated Press
Published:
February 6, 2019
Updated:
February 6, 2019 9:51 PM EST
In this Jan. 12, 2018 file photo, Virginia Gov.-elect, Lt. Gov Ralph Northam, centre, walks down the reviewing stand with Lt. Gov-elect, Justin Fairfax, right, and Attorney General Mark Herring at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. The political crisis in Virginia exploded Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019, when the state's attorney general confessed to putting on blackface in the 1980s and a woman went public with detailed allegations of sexual assault against the lieutenant governor. With Northam's career already hanging by a thread over a racist photo, the day's developments threatened to take down all three of Virginia's top elected officials. Steve Helber / AP, File
RICHMOND, Va. — The political crisis in Virginia spun out of control Wednesday when the state’s attorney general confessed to putting on blackface in the 1980s and a woman went public with detailed allegations of sexual assault against the lieutenant governor.
With Gov. Ralph Northam’s career already hanging by a thread over a racist photo in his 1984 medical school yearbook, the day’s developments threatened to take down all three of Virginia’s top elected officials, all of them Democrats.
The twin blows began with Attorney General Mark Herring issuing a statement acknowledging he wore brown makeup and a wig in 1980 to look like a rapper during a party when he was a 19-year-old student at the University of Virginia.
In this Sept. 25, 2018, file photo, Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax gestures during remarks before a meeting of the Campaign to reduce evictions at a church meeting room in Richmond, Va. Steve Helber / AP
Herring — who had previously called on Northam to resign and was planning to run for governor himself in 2021 — apologized for his “callous” behaviour and said that the days ahead “will make it clear whether I can or should continue to serve.”
The 57-year-old Herring came clean after rumours about the existence of a blackface photo of him began circulating at the Capitol, though he made no mention of a picture Wednesday.
Then, within hours, Vanessa Tyson, the California woman whose sexual assault allegations against Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax surfaced earlier this week, put out a detailed statement saying Fairfax forced her to perform oral sex on him in a hotel room in 2004 during the Democratic National Convention in Boston.
The Associated Press typically does not identify those who say they were sexually assaulted, but Tyson issued the statement in her name.
Tyson, a 42-year-old political scientist who is on a fellowship at Stanford University and specializes in the political discourse of sexual assault, said, “I have no political motive. I am a proud Democrat.”
“Mr. Fairfax has tried to brand me as a liar to a national audience, in service to his political ambitions, and has threatened litigation,” she said. “Given his false assertions, I’m compelled to make clear what happened.”
Fairfax — who is in line to become governor if Northam resigns — has repeatedly denied her allegations, saying that the encounter was consensual and that he is the victim of a strategically timed political smear.
This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. The page shows a picture, at right, of a person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood next to different pictures of the governor. Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP
“At no time did she express to me any discomfort or concern about our interactions, neither during that encounter, nor during the months following it, when she stayed in touch with me, nor the past 15 years,” he said in a statement.
Tyson said she suffered “deep humiliation and shame” and stayed quiet about the allegations as she pursued her career, but by late 2017, as the #MeToo movement took shape and after she saw an article about Fairfax’s campaign, she took her story to The Washington Post, which decided months later not to publish a story.
The National Organization for Women immediately called on Fairfax to resign, saying, “Her story is horrifying, compelling and clear as day — and we believe her.”
The string of scandals that began when the yearbook picture came to light last Friday could have a domino effect on Virginia state government: If Northam and Fairfax fall, Herring would be next in line to become governor. After Herring comes House Speaker Kirk Cox, a conservative Republican.
At the Capitol, lawmakers were dumbstruck over the day’s fast-breaking developments, with Democratic Sen. Barbara Favola saying, “I have to take a breath and think about this. This is moving way too quickly.” GOP House Majority Leader Todd Gilbert said it would be “reckless” to comment. “There’s just too much flying around,” he said.
The chairman of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, Del. Lamont Bagby, said, “We’ve got a lot to digest.”
Cox issued a statement late Wednesday calling the allegations against Fairfax “extremely serious” and said they need a “full airing of facts.” Cox also urged Herring to “adhere to the standard he has set for others,” a nod to Herring’s previous call that Northam resign.
Democrats have expressed fear that the uproar over the governor could jeopardize their chances of taking control of the GOP-dominated Virginia legislature this year. The party made big gains in 2017, in part because of a backlash against President Donald Trump, and has moved to within striking distance of a majority in both houses.
At the same time, the Democrats nationally have taken a hard line against misconduct in their ranks because women and minorities are a vital part of their base and they want to be able to criticize Trump’s behaviour without looking hypocritical.
Northam has come under pressure from nearly the entire Democratic establishment to resign after the discovery of a photo on his profile page in the Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook of someone in blackface standing next to a person in a Ku Klux Klan hood and robe.
The governor initially admitted he was in the photo without saying which costume he was wearing, then denied it a day later. But he acknowledged he once used shoe polish to blacken his face and look like Michael Jackson at a dance contest in Texas in 1984, when he was in the Army.
Herring came down hard on Northam when the yearbook photo surfaced, condemning it as “indefensible,” and “profoundly offensive.” He said it was no longer possible for Northam to lead the state.
On Wednesday, though, Herring confessed that he and two friends dressed up to look like rappers, admitting: “It sounds ridiculous even now writing it.”
In this Oct. 6, 2003 file photo, Kurtis Walker, known by his rap name Kurtis Blow, poses in the Harlem neighbourhood in the Manhattan borough of New York. Jim Cooper / AP, File
“That conduct clearly shows that, as a young man, I had a callous and inexcusable lack of awareness and insensitivity to the pain my behaviour could inflict on others,” he said. But he added: “This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years since.”
Democratic Sen. Louise Lucas said several people were crying, including men, as Herring apologized to black lawmakers Wednesday morning before issuing his public statement.
“He said he was very sorry,” Lucas said.
Lucas said the black lawmakers told Herring they needed to discuss their next steps among themselves.
Herring, who was elected to his second four-year term in 2017, made a name for himself nationally by playing a central role in bringing gay marriage to Virginia.
When he first took office, he announced he would no longer defend the state’s ban on same-sex marriage.
A federal judge overturned the ban, citing Herring’s opposition, and Virginia began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples in 2014, nearly a full year before the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/mor...rty-in-college
 
EagleSmack
+2
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

BLACKFACE, KKK OUTFIT AND ALLEGED SEX ASSAULT: Top 3 Democrats under fire in Virginia


Democrats being Democrats
 
Hoof Hearted
#26
 
spaminator
#27
Could embattled Virginia leader be impeached?
Associated Press
Published:
February 10, 2019
Updated:
February 10, 2019 8:17 PM EST
RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia lawmakers on Monday will reluctantly face the unprecedented prospect of impeaching the state’s second most powerful leader as they struggle to address revelations of past racist behaviour and allegations of sexual assault roiling its highest levels of office.
At least one lawmaker said he will try to pursue impeachment of Democratic Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax after two women accused Fairfax of sexual assault in the 2000s, a move that experts believe would be a first in Virginia. Fairfax has vehemently denied the claims and called for authorities, including the FBI, to investigate.
There’s little sign of broad appetite for impeachment, with lawmakers set to finish this year’s session by the month’s end. But the Legislature is swirling with questions about lines of succession and the political fallout for Democrats should the governor, lieutenant governor or attorney general leave office, willingly or not.
Gov. Ralph Northam and Attorney General Mark Herring, both Democrats, are embroiled in their own scandal after acknowledging they wore blackface in the 1980s. Northam, a pediatric neurologist, said Sunday that he considered resigning but that he’s “not going anywhere” because the state “needs someone that can heal” it.
Northam said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that it’s been a difficult week since a racist photo in his 1984 medical school yearbook surfaced, showing a person wearing blackface next to another person in a Ku Klux Klan hood and robe. Northam initially said he was in the photo, then denied it the next day, while acknowledging that he did wear blackface to a dance party that same year.
“Virginia needs someone that can heal. There’s no better person to do that than a doctor,” Northam said. “Virginia also needs someone who is strong, who has empathy, who has courage and who has a moral compass. And that’s why I’m not going anywhere.”
The scandals have become a full-blown crisis for Virginia Democrats. Although the party has taken an almost zero-tolerance approach to sexual misconduct in the #MeToo era, a housecleaning in Virginia could be costly: If all three Democrats resigned, Republican state House Speaker Kirk Cox would become governor.
Political considerations will be key to what comes next. Virginia is among a handful of states electing lawmakers this year, and Democrats had hoped to flip the Republican-controlled General Assembly.
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam talks during an interview at the Governor’s Mansion, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019 in Richmond, Va. The embattled governor says he wants to spend the remaining three years of his term pursuing racial “equity.” Northam told The Washington Post that there is a higher reason for the “horrific” reckoning over a racist photograph that appeared in his medical school yearbook. Katherine Frey / AP
Democratic Del. Patrick Hope said he wants to introduce articles of impeachment Monday against Fairfax, who is black. Meredith Watson and Vanessa Tyson have accused him of sexual assault and offered to testify at any impeachment hearing.
The Associated Press generally does not name people who say they are victims of sexual assault, but both women have come forward voluntarily.
Watson alleges Fairfax raped her while they were students at Duke University in 2000, her attorney said in a statement. Tyson, a California college professor, accused Fairfax of forcing her to perform oral sex on him at a Boston hotel in 2004.
The lieutenant governor issued a statement Saturday again denying he ever sexually assaulted anyone and making clear he does not intend to immediately step down. Instead, he urged authorities to investigate.
“Frankly, we really want any entity with comprehensive investigative power to thoroughly look into these accusations,” Fairfax spokeswoman Lauren Burke said. “There needs to be verification of basic facts about these allegations. It feels like something bigger is going on here.”
Some political observers said it’s possible impeachment would move forward in the House of Delegates — even if the threshold to start the process is remarkably high. However, lawmakers are set to leave town before February ends and may lack the time and resources to immediately take on the complicated issue.
“A clear sign of the depth of LG Fairfax’s political crisis is the near-absence of voices in Virginia politics this weekend publicly urging him to remain in office,” University of Mary Washington political science professor Stephen Farnsworth said in an email.
If the Legislature is in session, the House would need a simple majority to vote to impeach Fairfax, said A.E. Dick Howard, a University of Virginia law professor. The Senate would then review evidence and hear testimony. That chamber would need a two-thirds vote to convict among senators who are present.
Embattled Virginia governor: ‘I’m not going anywhere’
BLACKFACE, KKK OUTFIT AND ALLEGED SEX ASSAULT: Top 3 Democrats under fire in Virginia
Northam blackface scandal spotlights deeply embedded racism in U.S.
Another possibility: Fairfax simply hangs on as he disputes the allegations.
“Before Donald Trump, I would say with this kind of stuff, it’s impossible for a person to just hang on, put their head down and ignore it,” said Quentin Kidd, a political science professor at Christopher Newport University. “Post-Donald Trump, I think what elected officials are willing to do has changed in some ways. So can he hang on? Certainly he can hang on.”
If Fairfax were to leave, it’s unclear who could replace him. Northam may try to appoint a Democrat, while Republicans could mount a legal challenge with the goal of getting Senate Pro Tem Steve Newman to serve as both a voting senator and temporary lieutenant governor.
Meanwhile, the attorney general’s future is unknown. Herring, who acknowledged wearing blackface at a party in 1980, would become governor if both Northam and Fairfax left office. Herring has apologized but has not indicated he would resign, despite his initial forceful call for the governor to step down.
Asked Sunday for his opinion on his subordinates, Northam told CBS that it’s up to them to decide whether they want to stay in office. He said he supports Fairfax’s call for an investigation into the sexual assault allegations. Of Herring, he said that “just like me, he has grown.”
Northam’s pledge Sunday to work on healing Virginia’s racial divide was his second in as many days. In his first interview since the scandal erupted, he told The Washington Post on Saturday that the uproar has pushed him to confront the state’s deep and lingering divisions, as well as his own insensitivity. But he said that reflection has convinced him that, by remaining in office, he can work to resolve them.
“It’s obvious from what happened this week that we still have a lot of work to do,” Northam said. “There are still some very deep wounds in Virginia, and especially in the area of equity.”
http://youtube.com/watch?v=kUgjmXcx3bc
http://youtube.com/watch?v=wL-jXMlEkr4
http://torontosun.com/news/world/cou...r-be-impeached
 
spaminator
#28
Embattled Virginia governor: 'I'm not going anywhere'
Associated Press
Published:
February 10, 2019
Updated:
February 10, 2019 4:38 PM EST
In this file photo taken on October 19, 2017, then Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam speaks during a campaign rally in Richmond, Virginia. (JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
RICHMOND, Va. — Democratic Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam considered resigning amid a scandal that he once wore blackface, but the pediatric neurologist said Sunday that he’s “not going anywhere” because the state “needs someone that can heal” it.
Northam said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that it’s been a difficult week since a racist photo in his 1984 medical school yearbook surfaced, showing a person wearing blackface next to a second person wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood and robe.
Northam initially said he had appeared in the photo — although he didn’t say which costume he was wearing — and apologized. The next day, however, he denied being in the photo, while acknowledging that he had worn blackface to a dance party that same year.
“Virginia needs someone that can heal. There’s no better person to do that than a doctor,” Northam said. “Virginia also needs someone who is strong, who has empathy, who has courage and who has a moral compass. And that’s why I’m not going anywhere.”
Northam’s political turmoil comes as the two other top Democrats in the state face their own potentially career-ending scandals, with allegations of sexual assault against Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax — Northam’s successor if the governor were to resign — and Attorney General Mark Herring acknowledging that he wore blackface at a party in 1980. Herring would become governor if both Northam and Fairfax resigned.
The scandals have become a full-blown crisis for Virginia Democrats. Although the party has taken an almost zero-tolerance approach to misconduct among its members in this #MeToo era, a housecleaning in Virginia could be costly: If all three Democrats resigned, Republican state House Speaker Kirk Cox would become governor.
The scandals also could hurt the Democrats’ chances of flipping control of the General Assembly. All 140 legislative seats will be up for grabs in November, and Democrats had previously been hopeful that voter antipathy toward President Donald Trump would help them cement Virginia’s status as a blue state.
Now, many fret their crisis in leadership will not only cost them chances of winning GOP-held seats, but also several seats held by Democrats.
Two women allege Fairfax sexually assaulted them and both have offered to testify if an impeachment hearing were called against him. The lieutenant governor issued a statement Saturday again denying he ever sexually assaulted anyone and making clear he does not intend to immediately step down. Instead, he urged authorities to investigate the allegations against him.
Herring has apologized for appearing in blackface but has not indicated he would resign either, despite his initially forceful call for Northam to step down. The admission came after rumours began circulating at the Capitol.
Asked Sunday for his opinion on his subordinates, Northam said in the CBS interview that it’s up to Fairfax and Herring to decide whether they want to remain in office. He said he supports Fairfax’s call for an investigation into the sexual assault allegations. Of Herring, he said that “just like me, he has grown.”
Democratic Del. Patrick Hope said he wants to introduce articles of impeachment against Fairfax on Monday, but Hope is not a powerful figure in the House and there’s little sign there’s a broad appetite for impeachment with lawmakers set to finish this year’s legislative session by the end of the month.
If a hearing did occur, attorneys for both of Fairfax’s accusers — Meredith Watson and Vanessa Tyson — say they would be willing to testify. The Associated Press does not generally name those who say they are victims of sexual assault, but both women have come forward voluntarily.
Watson alleges that Fairfax raped her while they were students at Duke University in 2000, her attorney said in a statement. Tyson, a California college professor, accused Fairfax of forcing her to perform oral sex on him at a Boston hotel in 2004.
While denying the allegations, Fairfax called on authorities, including the FBI, to conduct a full investigation.
It was not clear on what basis the FBI would investigate. The agency has jurisdiction over federal crimes, but sexual assault allegations like the ones Fairfax is facing are traditionally regarded as state offences handled by local police and prosecutors.
One way the FBI could potentially become involved is if Fairfax were to allege that he is the victim of extortion — which is a federal crime — but he has not made that claim.
“Frankly, we really want any entity with comprehensive investigative power to thoroughly look into these accusations,” Fairfax spokeswoman Lauren Burke said. “There needs to be verification of basic facts about these allegations. It feels like something bigger is going on here.”
Northam’s pledge Sunday to work on healing the state’s racial divide was the second he made in as many days.
In his first interview since the scandal erupted, a chastened governor told The Washington Post on Saturday that the uproar has pushed him to confront the state’s deep and lingering divisions over race, as well as his own insensitivity. But he said such reflection has convinced him that, by remaining in office, he can work to resolve them.
“It’s obvious from what happened this week that we still have a lot of work to do,” Northam said. “There are still some very deep wounds in Virginia, and especially in the area of equity.”
Also Saturday, Northam made his first official public appearance since he denied being in the photo, attending the funeral for a state trooper killed in a shootout. But he made no public comments.
The lieutenant governor did not make any public appearances Saturday and released his statement late in the day, after the Republican House speaker and the Democratic Party of Virginia joined a chorus of other calls for Fairfax to resign.
Virginia’s Democratic congressional delegation was split.
If Fairfax were to leave, it’s unclear who could replace him. Northam may try to appoint a Democrat, while Republicans could mount a legal challenge with the goal of having Sen. Steve Newman, the Senate’s pro tem, serve as both a voting senator and temporary lieutenant governor.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=80XOlgDHIv4
http://youtube.com/watch?v=plzX2WTMKOw
http://torontosun.com/news/world/emb...going-anywhere
 
EagleSmack
+1
#29
Looks like the Democrat Klan members are going to fight it out.