Canadian Border Fence: U.S. Eyes Barriers On The 49th Parallel


B00Mer
#1


OTTAWA - The United States is looking at building fences along the border with Canada to help keep out terrorists and other criminals.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency has proposed the use of "fencing and other barriers" on the 49th parallel to manage "trouble spots where passage of cross-border violators is difficult to control."

The border service is also pondering options including a beefed-up technological presence through increased use of radar, sensors, cameras, drones and vehicle scanners. In addition, it might continue to improve or expand customs facilities at ports of entry.

The agency considered but ruled out the possibility of hiring "significantly more" U.S. Border Patrol agents to increase the rate of inspections, noting staffing has already risen in recent years.

The proposals are spelled out in a new draft report by the border service that examines the possible environmental impact of the various options over the next five to seven years.

Customs and Border Protection is inviting comment on the options and plans a series of public meetings in Washington and several U.S. border communities next month. It will then decide which ideas to pursue.

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano noted last month the challenges of monitoring the vast, sparsely populated northern border region. She stressed manpower, but also a greater reliance on technology.

Ironically, the moves come as Canada and the U.S. try to finalize a perimeter security arrangement that would focus on continental defences while easing border congestion. It would be aimed at speeding passage of goods and people across the Canada-U.S. border, which has become something of a bottleneck since the 9-11 terrorist attacks.

Relatively speaking, Washington has focused more energy and resources on tightening security along the border with Mexico than at the sprawling one with Canada.

But that may be changing.

A U.S. Government Accountability Office report recently warned that only a small portion of the border with Canada is properly secure. It said U.S. border officers control just 50 kilometres of the 6,400-kilometre boundary.

The Customs and Border Protection report says while fences have been a big element in deterring unauthorized crossings of the U.S.-Mexican border, "it is unlikely that fencing will play as prominent a role" on the northern border, given its length and terrain that varies from prairie to forest.

However, the agency would use fencing and other barriers such as trenches to control movement and sometimes delay people trying to sneak across the border, increasing the likelihood they could be caught, says the report.

It doesn't provide details about what the fences might look like, but suggests they would be designed to blend into the environment and "complement the natural landscape."

The approach would also involve upgrading roadways and trails near the border.

"The lack of roads or presence of unmaintained roads impedes efficient surveillance operations," says the report. "Improving or expanding the roadway and trail networks could improve mobility, allowing agents to patrol more miles each day and shortening response times."

Over the last two years, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has already made what it calls "critical security improvements along the northern border," adding inspectors at the ports of entry and Border Patrol agents between ports, as well as modernizing land crossings.

Nearly 3,800 Customs and Border Protection officers scrutinize people and goods at crossings. The number of Border Patrol agents working between crossings along the northern parallel has increased 700 per cent since Sept. 11, 2001. And some three dozen land ports of entry are being modernized.

Unmanned U.S. aircraft patrol about 1,500 kilometres along the northern border from Washington to Minnesota as well as more than 300 kilometres of the Canadian border around New York state and Lake Ontario.

Border Crossing - YouTube


Canadian Border Fence: U.S. Eyes Barriers On The 49th Parallel

 
lone wolf
+2
#2
Here'd be a great use for all those old gas station ding-ding lines
 
Mowich
#3
Just read in the NY Times that Napolitano has resigned as head of HLS..........wonder if that will make a dint in their plans to keep all the terrorists from swarming across the border, hiking over the mountains, swimming the rivers or slogging through the bush.
 
Palindrome
#4
Since they have all that surplus revenue and no roads or bridges or storm damage that need repair.... and it's certainly easier to stop terrorists than 3-year-olds with pink rifles.... sure.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#5
Maybe we can help them out with some steel and electronics.
 
Cliffy
+3
#6
The upshot would be that the flow of illegal guns to Canada from the US to our street gangs may be curtailed.
 
EagleSmack
#7
Oh the poor corrupted northern youth.
 
Cliffy
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Oh the poor corrupted northern youth.

I was being facetious. They could build a 50 foot fence the length of the border and nothing would change.

Gangs are a natural product of economic disparity and over crowding. Every major city has them.
 
darkbeaver
+4
#9  Top Rated Post
The new measures are designed to keep Americans at home. The terrorists are actually the ones in favour of tighter border security.
 
L Gilbert
#10
Oh, brother. Perhaps those Europeans should have chunked the Berlin Wall and sent it here rather than trashing it. And they could mount these on the wall every couple kilometers or so; South Korea's Auto-Turret Can Kill a Man in the Dead of Night From Three Clicks
 
darkbeaver
+2
#11
Our border should remain open for American refugees.
 
Corduroy
+2
#12
So long as they're paying.
 
Nuggler
#13
No more swimming the St. Lawrence for me...........
 
darkbeaver
+2
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

So long as they're paying.

They will pay with yankee know how, you know stuf like teaching us about democracy how to build houses, how to plant gardens, personal hygene all the stuff we don't have now because of the snow.
 
lone wolf
+3
#15
The freedom of walls....
 
Stretch
+1
#16
Canada is a great country with great people, but she should've built the fence years ago, with 1 door, and one handle, on the northern side of the door!
 
Sparrow
#17
Oh this is what is call relations, cooperation and friendship! HA
 
Cliffy
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post

Oh this is what is call relations, cooperation and friendship! HA

But Canada is a veritable gateway of terrorist activity flowing south.
 
Goober
#19
Their borders who are we to say what is right.
 
Nuggler
+1
#20
......Aw shyte, it's Fri. night. I don't care.
 
taxslave
#21
As long as the fence is built with union labour and financed by US taxpayers I see no problem. Wonder what they will pay for fence posts?
 
B00Mer
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Just read in the NY Times that Napolitano has resigned as head of HLS..........wonder if that will make a dint in their plans to keep all the terrorists from swarming across the border, hiking over the mountains, swimming the rivers or slogging through the bush.



HURRAY!!! The Anti-Canadian Dyke is gone... Woo Hoo!!!

U.S. Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano to resign, Sen. Schumer pushes for NYPD Chief Ray Kelly as her replacement - NY Daily News



Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

So long as they're paying.

Yeah, they will have all the illegal Mexicans build the border fences on the Canadian and Mexican border, then toss them over it, to the other side, when they are finished..
 

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