Nationalizing big oil and gas, withdrawing from NAFTA, and establishing a national cy


skookumchuck
Free Thinker
#1
Been a lot of BS and changes from these fools over the years, they know that without Quebec they are dead as usual so they beat the dead horse.............



OTTAWA — Nationalizing big oil and gas, withdrawing from NAFTA, and establishing a national cycling strategy are among the resolutions New Democrats will debate at a policy convention this weekend.
The items are on the complete list of 432 proposals the party received from riding associations, the party’s youth wing, the executive council and NDP committees and commissions. The party released the list online over the weekend.
Before the entire list was revealed, Postmedia News obtained the top 15 resolutions in each of seven categories, chosen by a committee tasked with winnowing down the entire list. Those top 105 resolutions are considered to be the most timely, most relevant and most representative of different parts of the country.
The rejection of public-private partnerships, marijuana decriminalization “as the first step to legalization” and a foreign investment review of Target’s takeover of Zellers were on that list. But as expected, the full list of proposals features some more controversial items.
Some of the environment-focused resolutions include supporting a ban on hydraulic fracturing in the Great Lakes Basin, ending captivity and captive breeding of whales, dolphins and porpoises, and enshrining the “right to a healthy environment” in the Canadian Constitution.
Others call for the “immediate cancellation” of the Northern Gateway Pipeline and opposing expansion of the Kinder Morgan pipeline, and to halt and phase out development of the “Alberta Tar Sands.” ..................................................


NDP policies to be debated run the gamut from clean energy to the Canadian identity and the Middle East
 
damngrumpy
No Party Affiliation
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
First of all I think the discussion of such topics is good it provides a forum for discussion.
Should we nationalize big oil, no I think its counter productive to go that far, should there
be stricter regulations in some cases yes.
I think NAFTA and other big trade deals with Asia should be cancelled as well. We should
use our resources to dictate the agenda, as to who gets energy and who does not.
I am against public private partnerships too and the reason is economic. The standard is
the company makes a minimum five percent profit That encourages waste as the profit
margin is guaranteed. Private interests are also in control of our infrastructure.
Decriminalize pot and right on the heals of it legalize it.
The foreign investment issue should be resolved on an individual basis some things don't
really matter in the scheme of things while others have an impact those that do should be
regulated.
I think the parities should explore options in the way we do politics, business and society.
Just because you discuss it or advocate positions does not mean that is the last word.
I think its healthy to discuss controversial subjects.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+2
#3
A national cycling strategy????
 
skookumchuck
Free Thinker
#4
I have no position on the status of pot, i do not vote to decriminalize it, nor do i vote to whack people over it. One thing i do believe is that the general idea of all problems with it going away due to decriminalization is pure BS.
 
tay
+1
#5
Why It's Time to Revolt Against the Worst "Trade Agreement" in History


Odds are that you have not have heard of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. While the TPP has been under negotiation since 2008, talks have largely been done in secret and not covered by the mass media.

The media black-out is quite impressive since this is the largest corporate trade agreement to be negotiated since the World Trade Organization got underway in 1995. Commonly called a global corporate coup, the TPP makes transnational corporations more powerful than governments. Others call it “NAFTA on steroids” because it will multiply the failures of NAFTA. -

If People Knew Its Contents, It Could Not Pass

When it comes to trade, Obama has been the most secretive president. Past trade agreements were made public and discussed in the media. The Office of the US Trade Representative would publish the text on its website, even as the treaty was being negotiated.

Not this time.

The TPP is being kept secret from everyone except for the 600 corporate advisers who can read the text on their computers as it is being created, and help the US Trade Representative draft the language. These include the biggest transnational corporations like WalMart, Bank of America, JPMorgan, Pfizer and Monsanto or their trade associations. The TPP is being drafted of, by and for the transnational corporations.

Members of Congress, however, have restricted access to the text and when they do see a summary of it, they must keep the contents secret even from their constituents. The media and public have only seen sections that have been leaked.

Why are the corporations operating in secret? Former US Trade Representative Ron Kirk said that if the people knew what was in the agreement, it would raise such opposition that it could make the deal impossible to sign. Kirk led the negotiations on the TPP but left recently to join a lobbying firm that represents transnational corporations. If Kirk is right -- that if people knew what was in it, it would not pass -- then, should it pass? -


See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/trash-tpp-why-its-time-revolt-against-worst-trade-agreement-history#sthash.tHR33zTr.dpuf


The Council of Canadians is one of 30 organizational sponsors (so far) of a new pledge to Flush the TPP -- to take action against the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations globally between now and a planned September round that will in all likelihood take place in Vancouver. The Flush the TPP campaign is still accepting organizational and individual sign-ons. Click on the image to learn more.
The new Flush the TPP website, which is focused on action against the secretive 12-country corporate rights deal, explains:

The TPP affects many issues, including worker’s rights and wages, environmental collapse and climate change, sovereignty of nations and democratic rule of law, Internet freedom and online creativity, food safety and agriculture, healthcare and financial regulation (including controls over the flow of capital), and much more.

.

More immediately, Global Exchange is encouraging people to join its #TPPTuesday Social Media Action Team, an online effort to promote and expand the growing movement against the next "NAFTA on Steroids."


We hope to confirm soon whether the 19th TPP negotiating round will take place in Vancouver as rumoured at the end of August and early September. Fair trade activists in B.C. and the northeastern United States are already discussing how to challenge this corporate rights deal in solidarity with international allies.

Council of Canadians pledges to Flush the TPP (and you can too) | The Council of Canadians
 
Machjo
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by skookumchuck View Post

Been a lot of BS and changes from these fools over the years, they know that without Quebec they are dead as usual so they beat the dead horse.............



OTTAWA — Nationalizing big oil and gas, withdrawing from NAFTA, and establishing a national cycling strategy are among the resolutions New Democrats will debate at a policy convention this weekend.
The items are on the complete list of 432 proposals the party received from riding associations, the party’s youth wing, the executive council and NDP committees and commissions. The party released the list online over the weekend.
Before the entire list was revealed, Postmedia News obtained the top 15 resolutions in each of seven categories, chosen by a committee tasked with winnowing down the entire list. Those top 105 resolutions are considered to be the most timely, most relevant and most representative of different parts of the country.
The rejection of public-private partnerships, marijuana decriminalization “as the first step to legalization” and a foreign investment review of Target’s takeover of Zellers were on that list. But as expected, the full list of proposals features some more controversial items.
Some of the environment-focused resolutions include supporting a ban on hydraulic fracturing in the Great Lakes Basin, ending captivity and captive breeding of whales, dolphins and porpoises, and enshrining the “right to a healthy environment” in the Canadian Constitution.
Others call for the “immediate cancellation” of the Northern Gateway Pipeline and opposing expansion of the Kinder Morgan pipeline, and to halt and phase out development of the “Alberta Tar Sands.” ..................................................


NDP policies to be debated run the gamut from clean energy to the Canadian identity and the Middle East

I was an NDP member for a year (active for a few weeks during a federal election campaing, many, many years ago, I was in my early 20s then, and then let my year-membership expire). I joined because I thought, hey, it's the NDP, they care about people, I care about people, so why not.

When I went to our first meeting, I had all kinds of ideas in mind (money for universal compulsory education in poorer countries (I was ignorant of poverty on reserves then), free trade to help poorer countries develop, literacy and skills training for the most destitute Canadians, etc.). At the meeting, I didn't talk much if at all since I quickly realised I was dead wrong (protectionism to protects our high wages, subsidies to middle class university student bus passes, etc.) All about me me me. I was so turned off I left and never looked back. Strangely enough, I was debating between the NDP (pro-UN and international law) and the Reform Party (very prio-free-trade). Even today I tend to swing between parties like that.

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

A national cycling strategy????

Depending on what they meant, it might make sense. However, seeing that few would cycle cross-nation, it would seem to me that it would make more sense for local cycling strategies with collaboration between neighbouring municipalities.

One thing I will say about free-trade though, is that it has to be not just about goods and services but people too. For instance, no free trade agreement would make it easier for a product to cross than a human. They should all include free labour movement agreements as well as collaboration between ministries of education to ensure common education standards in trades and professions so as to make qualifications more universally recognized. The idea that goods are more important than people is ridiculous.

Also, no free trade agreement should place any restriction on the price at which a government intends to ask for the sell of its national resourceds. It should be free to ask the price it wants for its resources any more than any company can ask the price it wants for its product.

This way a government trying to preserve its resources could raise the price to reduce the sale of its natural resources. This has nothing to do with protectionism since it would not in any way discriminate between buyers based on nationality. Everyone would still have to pay the same price.

Also, the government should be free to not sell a resource at all. Again, this does not violate the principle of no economic discrimination on th ebasis of nationality.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#7
This sounds more like Justine Trudeau policies, turning Canada into Venezuela...
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

This sounds more like Justine Trudeau policies, turning Canada into Venezuela...

Great idea. It would get my vote. The sooner we do it the sooner the US will bomb us back into the stone age.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Why It's Time to Revolt Against the Worst "Trade Agreement" in History


Odds are that you have not have heard of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. While the TPP has been under negotiation since 2008, talks have largely been done in secret and not covered by the mass media.

The media black-out is quite impressive since this is the largest corporate trade agreement to be negotiated since the World Trade Organization got underway in 1995. Commonly called a global corporate coup, the TPP makes transnational corporations more powerful than governments. Others call it “NAFTA on steroids” because it will multiply the failures of NAFTA. -

If People Knew Its Contents, It Could Not Pass

When it comes to trade, Obama has been the most secretive president. Past trade agreements were made public and discussed in the media. The Office of the US Trade Representative would publish the text on its website, even as the treaty was being negotiated.

Not this time.

The TPP is being kept secret from everyone except for the 600 corporate advisers who can read the text on their computers as it is being created, and help the US Trade Representative draft the language. These include the biggest transnational corporations like WalMart, Bank of America, JPMorgan, Pfizer and Monsanto or their trade associations. The TPP is being drafted of, by and for the transnational corporations.

Members of Congress, however, have restricted access to the text and when they do see a summary of it, they must keep the contents secret even from their constituents. The media and public have only seen sections that have been leaked.

Why are the corporations operating in secret? Former US Trade Representative Ron Kirk said that if the people knew what was in the agreement, it would raise such opposition that it could make the deal impossible to sign. Kirk led the negotiations on the TPP but left recently to join a lobbying firm that represents transnational corporations. If Kirk is right -- that if people knew what was in it, it would not pass -- then, should it pass? -


See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/trash-tpp-why-its-time-revolt-against-worst-trade-agreement-history#sthash.tHR33zTr.dpuf


The Council of Canadians is one of 30 organizational sponsors (so far) of a new pledge to Flush the TPP -- to take action against the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations globally between now and a planned September round that will in all likelihood take place in Vancouver. The Flush the TPP campaign is still accepting organizational and individual sign-ons. Click on the image to learn more.
The new Flush the TPP website, which is focused on action against the secretive 12-country corporate rights deal, explains:

The TPP affects many issues, including worker’s rights and wages, environmental collapse and climate change, sovereignty of nations and democratic rule of law, Internet freedom and online creativity, food safety and agriculture, healthcare and financial regulation (including controls over the flow of capital), and much more.

.

More immediately, Global Exchange is encouraging people to join its #TPPTuesday Social Media Action Team, an online effort to promote and expand the growing movement against the next "NAFTA on Steroids."


We hope to confirm soon whether the 19th TPP negotiating round will take place in Vancouver as rumoured at the end of August and early September. Fair trade activists in B.C. and the northeastern United States are already discussing how to challenge this corporate rights deal in solidarity with international allies.

Council of Canadians pledges to Flush the TPP (and you can too) | The Council of Canadians

Nice C&P from the leftarded rag. Everyone that can read has heard about the TPP by now. Mostly it is a good idea as is the pending agreement with the EU if that organization does not self-destruct first. Protectionism is not good for the economy when you are an exporting nation like Canada.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

This sounds more like Justine Trudeau policies, turning Canada into Venezuela...

Why the hell do you think that Justin Trudeau would support the old Naional Energy Policy? I've read all of his speeches and he has never once mentioned it. When Trudeau senior was touting the NEP it was a different world and he underestimated the ire of the Albertans and the multinational oil companies. I'm sure Justin would not try to go down that path.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

A national cycling strategy????

Free bicycles for all.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Free bicycles for all.

No pistons? No thanks.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Why the hell do you think that Justin Trudeau would support the old Naional Energy Policy? I've read all of his speeches and he has never once mentioned it. When Trudeau senior was touting the NEP it was a different world and he underestimated the ire of the Albertans and the multinational oil companies. I'm sure Justin would not try to go down that path.

The US voted one guy in based on his Daddy's name.. Canada going to make the same mistake??

Of course Justin is not going to mention the NEP in his speeches, he would not get voted in.. he going to do like all politicians, lie to the public, make BS promises, and then fukk the Canadian public over after (if) he gets elected.
 
tay
+1
#14
Tom Walkom writes that Stephen Harper doesn't get the new world economy. Like Dr. Frankenstein's monster, the creature he helped create has run amok and is trashing his home. If we have had some good fortune, Harper has had nothing to do with it:

The secret truth of this recession is that Ottawa hasn’t had much to do with Canada’s relatively good fortune. Rather it has been our natural resources that — up to this point — have pulled us through. As long as countries like China are willing to pay top dollar for petroleum and other commodities, the countries that possess such resources do well. Australia, a resource economy governed by the leftish Labour Party, has survived the Great Recession as handily as Conservative-run Canada.

But when it comes to economic policy, the Harper government has been a failure:

The Harper government’s failure is longer-term. It still operates under the assumption that free trade and free markets will conquer all.

This is an old model. It is out of date. True, the Great Depression of the 1930s was aggravated because there were too many barriers to the free movement of labour, goods and capital. But the Great Recession of the 21st century is aggravated by the fact that there are too few.This is the lesson of the crippled eurozone. It is also the lesson of Japan, which started to do better only after it elected a nationalist (and right-wing) government willing to challenge trade orthodoxyCanada’s Conservatives, however, remain focused on Quixotic, old-style projects that seem doomed to fail.

The truth is that Stephen Harper isn't stuck in the 20th century. He still hasn't emerged from the 19th century, the last time the world was awash in free trade fever.

At some point, the Chinese won’t want to pay top dollar for oil. At some point, the Americans will conclude that jobs at home trump trade deals abroad. Then what do we do?


You may recall that, in 1914, it all came crashing down.


more

Stephen Harper doesn’t get new world economy: Walkom | Toronto Star




the United Kingdom was the first country to adopt free trade policies in the early 19th century – largely inspired by Adam Smith’s influential theories. The benefits of trade liberalisation were so apparent that most Western countries followed suit and started to liberalise their trade and domestic economies as early as 1850. The so-called ‘Golden Age’ of globalisation lasted until 1914 and the start of the First World War. In a context of increased tensions and economic downturn, states turned their back on free trade and adopted more protectionist measures – the ultimate sin which, according to liberal scholars, contributed to the outbreak of the Second World War. Thankfully, trade was liberalised again after 1945 with the help of the Bretton Woods system and the creation of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), now called the WTO. This trend was confirmed in the 1980s with the rise of neoliberalism; and in today’s world, in the words of a free trade economist quoted by Dr Chang, you’re either neoliberal or “neo-idiotic”.

Dr Chang rejects this fairytale and argues there are several major flaws – and lies – in the official history of globalisation. For instance, during the ‘Golden Age’, the United States was the most protectionist nation on the planet; high tariffs allowed American industries to prosper and be protected from international competition. This leads us to the book’s most powerful argument: Western states have been consistently “kicking away the ladder from which they have climbed” by deterring developing countries from using protectionist measures which have been beneficial to the West – and sometimes still are. The author denounces this hypocrisy and reminds us that trade barriers and state intervention were instrumental for the emergence of competitive industries in his home country, South Korea


more

Book Review: Bad Samaritans by Ha-Joon Chang | socialjusticefirst
 
Nuggler
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Nice C&P from the leftarded rag. Everyone that can read has heard about the TPP by now. Mostly it is a good idea as is the pending agreement with the EU if that organization does not self-destruct first. Protectionism is not good for the economy when you are an exporting nation like Canada.

Which is what we did, Tax; exported the nation.

Haven't quit yet. Maybe we should give it some thought while we still have one.

.........A sort of not entirely free trade dead.........mehhhhhhhh..........hoonose?

jobs jobs jobs
 
Machjo
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Free bicycles for all.

I disagree with subsidizing bicycles. That said, it would have been more rational, if the government insisted on sybsidizing some transportation industry dutring the recession, to subsidize the bicycle industry over the car industry at least. More cars means mroe roads means more taxes.

Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Tom Walkom writes that Stephen Harper doesn't get the new world economy. Like Dr. Frankenstein's monster, the creature he helped create has run amok and is trashing his home. If we have had some good fortune, Harper has had nothing to do with it:

The secret truth of this recession is that Ottawa hasn’t had much to do with Canada’s relatively good fortune. Rather it has been our natural resources that — up to this point — have pulled us through. As long as countries like China are willing to pay top dollar for petroleum and other commodities, the countries that possess such resources do well. Australia, a resource economy governed by the leftish Labour Party, has survived the Great Recession as handily as Conservative-run Canada.

But when it comes to economic policy, the Harper government has been a failure:

The Harper government’s failure is longer-term. It still operates under the assumption that free trade and free markets will conquer all.

This is an old model. It is out of date. True, the Great Depression of the 1930s was aggravated because there were too many barriers to the free movement of labour, goods and capital. But the Great Recession of the 21st century is aggravated by the fact that there are too few.This is the lesson of the crippled eurozone. It is also the lesson of Japan, which started to do better only after it elected a nationalist (and right-wing) government willing to challenge trade orthodoxyCanada’s Conservatives, however, remain focused on Quixotic, old-style projects that seem doomed to fail.

The truth is that Stephen Harper isn't stuck in the 20th century. He still hasn't emerged from the 19th century, the last time the world was awash in free trade fever.

At some point, the Chinese won’t want to pay top dollar for oil. At some point, the Americans will conclude that jobs at home trump trade deals abroad. Then what do we do?


You may recall that, in 1914, it all came crashing down.


more

Stephen Harper doesn’t get new world economy: Walkom | Toronto Star




the United Kingdom was the first country to adopt free trade policies in the early 19th century – largely inspired by Adam Smith’s influential theories. The benefits of trade liberalisation were so apparent that most Western countries followed suit and started to liberalise their trade and domestic economies as early as 1850. The so-called ‘Golden Age’ of globalisation lasted until 1914 and the start of the First World War. In a context of increased tensions and economic downturn, states turned their back on free trade and adopted more protectionist measures – the ultimate sin which, according to liberal scholars, contributed to the outbreak of the Second World War. Thankfully, trade was liberalised again after 1945 with the help of the Bretton Woods system and the creation of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), now called the WTO. This trend was confirmed in the 1980s with the rise of neoliberalism; and in today’s world, in the words of a free trade economist quoted by Dr Chang, you’re either neoliberal or “neo-idiotic”.

Dr Chang rejects this fairytale and argues there are several major flaws – and lies – in the official history of globalisation. For instance, during the ‘Golden Age’, the United States was the most protectionist nation on the planet; high tariffs allowed American industries to prosper and be protected from international competition. This leads us to the book’s most powerful argument: Western states have been consistently “kicking away the ladder from which they have climbed” by deterring developing countries from using protectionist measures which have been beneficial to the West – and sometimes still are. The author denounces this hypocrisy and reminds us that trade barriers and state intervention were instrumental for the emergence of competitive industries in his home country, South Korea


more

Book Review: Bad Samaritans by Ha-Joon Chang | socialjusticefirst

If free trade between nations is bad, then free trade between provinces is bad. And if free trade between provinces is bad, then free trade between municipalities is bad. And if free trade between municipalities is bad, then so is trade between people. The logic is the same.

Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Which is what we did, Tax; exported the nation.

Haven't quit yet. Maybe we should give it some thought while we still have one.

.........A sort of not entirely free trade dead.........mehhhhhhhh..........hoonose?

jobs jobs jobs

My problem with protectionism (which many seem to forget) is that it's reciprocal. Even if the other nation deos not retaliate directly, over time it's bound to inflate our dollar to theirs, until they can't afford our product anymore anyway. In the end, a strong Canadian economy depends on a strong world economy. We cannot grow our own bananas efficiently. Simple as that.

Also, we can guarantee that the arguments advanced by the federal government for protectionism would be used by provincial governments in tought times. Before you know it, the feds would be trying to put out fires all the time, trying to make their arguments for protectionism apply to the nation only but not provinces, speaking out both sides of their mouths, until either one or the other will have to give.

Again, don't confuse free trade with government control over its non-renewable resources. Two different things. If there are obstacles to government control over its resoruce exploitation, that's not a problem with free trade as a principle, but rather with the specific agreement in question. Don't throw the baby out with the bath water.
 
hunboldt
Free Thinker
#17
Skook, a 'policy resolution' presented from a local ND riding committee can be From Say, Cypress Hills riding where three men and a dog make up the caretaker riding association.

Its grassroots democracy....

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

The US voted one guy in based on his Daddy's name.. Canada going to make the same mistake??

Of course Justin is not going to mention the NEP in his speeches, he would not get voted in.. he going to do like all politicians, lie to the public, make BS promises, and then fukk the Canadian public over after (if) he gets elected.

Historically, the Liberal party of Canada committed suicide after every 20-25 years of continuous power. The NEP was actually Marc Lalonde's brain bubble.
 
tay
#18
Oh Canada....Pay Attention.................




The giant multinationals are pushing a trade deal that will literally let them bypass our laws. This deal is called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and it is coming at us in the next few months. The corporations are trying to switch this gravy-train onto the “Fast Track.” For them this deal is the light at the end of the tunnel of democracy and self-government that has been trying to reign them in. We need to get this runaway train back on the rails



If TPP passes it will override American law. Again: we will not be able to pass laws that reign in the corporations. We will not be able to protect our jobs and wages because, as we have seen, companies can just close a factory and move your job to a country that pays very little, doesn’t protect the environment, and doesn’t let working people do anything about it. Of course the giant companies want these agreements — they let them tell us that if we ask for decent wages or benefits they will fire us and move our job out of the country.

Right now because of trade agreements already in effect we are not allowed to make laws even putting information like “dolphin safe” on tuna can labels .

El Salvador is being sued by a Canadian mining company for trying to require environmental permits , because of a similar trade agreement. This is what these trade agreements mean to our ability to reign in the giant corporations.


The giant, multinational corporations and their business groups are hopeful that they can push this through. The Financial Times explains, in Obama’s ‘fast-track’ trade push faces congressional delays ,
Corporate lobbyists, who have been pushing for a quick and uncontroversial approval of TPA [Fast Track], say they are still confident the talks will be successful.

“We are seeing signs of good support and momentum for TPA legislation in Congress and from the administration,” said David Thomas, vice-president for trade policy at the Business Roundtable, representing big blue-chip companies.
Multinationals Are Plotting to Steamroll What's Left of Our Democracy to Make Huge Profits | Alternet








 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Canada, the guy means the USA.. they need to do this..
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Oh Canada....Pay Attention.................




The giant multinationals are pushing a trade deal that will literally let them bypass our laws. This deal is called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and it is coming at us in the next few months. The corporations are trying to switch this gravy-train onto the “Fast Track.” For them this deal is the light at the end of the tunnel of democracy and self-government that has been trying to reign them in. We need to get this runaway train back on the rails



If TPP passes it will override American law. Again: we will not be able to pass laws that reign in the corporations. We will not be able to protect our jobs and wages because, as we have seen, companies can just close a factory and move your job to a country that pays very little, doesn’t protect the environment, and doesn’t let working people do anything about it. Of course the giant companies want these agreements — they let them tell us that if we ask for decent wages or benefits they will fire us and move our job out of the country.

Right now because of trade agreements already in effect we are not allowed to make laws even putting information like “dolphin safe” on tuna can labels .

El Salvador is being sued by a Canadian mining company for trying to require environmental permits , because of a similar trade agreement. This is what these trade agreements mean to our ability to reign in the giant corporations.


The giant, multinational corporations and their business groups are hopeful that they can push this through. The Financial Times explains, in Obama’s ‘fast-track’ trade push faces congressional delays ,

Corporate lobbyists, who have been pushing for a quick and uncontroversial approval of TPA [Fast Track], say they are still confident the talks will be successful.

“We are seeing signs of good support and momentum for TPA legislation in Congress and from the administration,” said David Thomas, vice-president for trade policy at the Business Roundtable, representing big blue-chip companies.
Multinationals Are Plotting to Steamroll What's Left of Our Democracy to Make Huge Profits | Alternet








You wearing two tinfoil hats now?