Autistic woman speaks out


karrie
#1
An interesting video created by an autistic woman, on the topic of personhood and human rights. It made me think of LGilbert's statement in recent weeks about how limited human senses are versus the senses of other creatures.








In My Language - YouTube!
 
L Gilbert
#2
Thanks, Karrie. There's a pretty interesting viewpoint that Ms. Baggs has. And she's dead right about our senses affecting us in different ways. I used to get pretty involved with how different things sounded and felt. Not so much now but I still experiment with sound and touch on occasion. Sight, taste, and smell were pretty normal for me, though. What is kind of sad is that so many people take their senses for granted and rarely, if ever, think at all about them. But as dim as our senses are, they are pretty important. lol
 
SLM
+2
#3  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

[B] An interesting video created by an autistic woman, on the topic of personhood and human rights. It made me think of LGilbert's statement in recent weeks about how limited human senses are versus the senses of other creatures.


In My Language - YouTube!

Very interesting video. I was especially intrigued by her comments emphasizing how it those with "normal communicative capabilities" who are unable to understand her or others like her as opposed to they being the ones who are incapable of communicating. As simple as the statement may seem, it can be a really difficult concept to wrap ones head around and truly understand it. And it is because she's right, we are quite limited. Communication is such an enormous part of the human condition, yet for the most part we seem to do it quite poorly. One only needs to spend a bit of time on the forum to get an idea of that.
 
karrie
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Thanks, Karrie. There's a pretty interesting viewpoint that Ms. Baggs has. And she's dead right about our senses affecting us in different ways. I used to get pretty involved with how different things sounded and felt. Not so much now but I still experiment with sound and touch on occasion. Sight, taste, and smell were pretty normal for me, though. What is kind of sad is that so many people take their senses for granted and rarely, if ever, think at all about them. But as dim as our senses are, they are pretty important. lol

I've been starting to have issues with the upper right quadrant of one eye, in which the vision has been double for over a year now. The effect of one small portion of your perception being out like that can be quite disorienting. Night driving can be almost impossible, racquetball (which I've recently taken up) is proving itself quite the challenge with all that bright white. Things start to distort and a layer of lace starts to fall over over my vision. If I weren't so busy trying to see 'normally' it's actually extraordinarily beautiful to see lights refract and the world melt into something different. I can only imagine trying to deal with ALL your senses, well, I'll use refracting for lack of a better word, like that. There is another video as well of a teenage autistic girl who talks using a computer in much the same way about the sensory overload that comes with autism and why they retreat into their own bubble the way they do. Having fibro, when my nerves overload, I can only imagine that's perhaps, what, 1/30th of what they feel?
 
DaSleeper
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

I've been starting to have issues with the upper right quadrant of one eye, in which the vision has been double for over a year now. The effect of one small portion of your perception being out like that can be quite disorienting. Night driving can be almost impossible, racquetball (which I've recently taken up) is proving itself quite the challenge with all that bright white. Things start to distort and a layer of lace starts to fall over over my vision. If I weren't so busy trying to see 'normally' it's actually extraordinarily beautiful to see lights refract and the world melt into something different. I can only imagine trying to deal with ALL your senses, well, I'll use refracting for lack of a better word, like that. There is another video as well of a teenage autistic girl who talks using a computer in much the same way about the sensory overload that comes with autism and why they retreat into their own bubble the way they do. Having fibro, when my nerves overload, I can only imagine that's perhaps, what, 1/30th of what they feel?

Sounds like cataracs in one eye only?????? or "floaters"
 
karrie
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Sounds like cataracs in one eye only?????? or "floaters"

No, the eye's been checked over thoroughly, it's not the eye. It's the optic nerve, or the brain, they're not sure which. It's actually pretty common with fibromyalgia to get inflammations of the optic nere just like all the rest of your nerves, but it's not usual for it to last for such a long time.
 
L Gilbert
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

I've been starting to have issues with the upper right quadrant of one eye, in which the vision has been double for over a year now. The effect of one small portion of your perception being out like that can be quite disorienting. Night driving can be almost impossible, racquetball (which I've recently taken up) is proving itself quite the challenge with all that bright white. Things start to distort and a layer of lace starts to fall over over my vision. If I weren't so busy trying to see 'normally' it's actually extraordinarily beautiful to see lights refract and the world melt into something different. I can only imagine trying to deal with ALL your senses, well, I'll use refracting for lack of a better word, like that. There is another video as well of a teenage autistic girl who talks using a computer in much the same way about the sensory overload that comes with autism and why they retreat into their own bubble the way they do. Having fibro, when my nerves overload, I can only imagine that's perhaps, what, 1/30th of what they feel?

It seems to be a incremental thing, too, rather than an either-you-have-it-fully-or-you-don't. I had just a small bit of it, as I mentioned and it was relatively easy to control. It seems to be exponential as the degree of autism rises. I suspect that 1/30th is an understatement.

Just found some interesting Qs and As: Explaining degrees of autism
Some of that brought up many memories.
 
bill barilko
#8
Could only watch about 30 seconds of that vid-drove me crazy.
 
karrie
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Could only watch about 30 seconds of that vid-drove me crazy.

You could skip past the stimming and instead find where she starts to talk.
 

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