Lamb recipes

#juan
#1
Last week the Superstore was offering frozen "Lamb Shoulder chops" at about five dollars a pound. They all seemed to be about one to one and a half kilograms. Once they are thawed out they look a bit like a butterflied leg of lamb and that is exactly how I cooked it. It probably would have been good on the barbeque but I just browned it slightly and put i into a covered pot with a couple onions and a few carrots and a half cup of red wine. I baked it in a 350 degree oven for one and a half hours. It turned out quite nice. This cut is a little less expensive than any other cut of boneless lamb.
 
karrie
#2
My family adores lamb... my kids go berserk for it. Their absolute fave is skewered and bbq'd. Typically I just find whatever lamb is affordable, trim and cube it, and dress it with a greek marinade (lemon juice, olive oil, pepper, basil, garlic, salt). Not too strong, as you don't want to totally overpower the meat. Then we serve it with a feta sauce (desired amount of strained balkan yogurt, mix in feta and paprika to taste... I make a fairly thick sauce with lots of feta). Assorted grilled vegetables complete the meal, and help give you more vehicles for getting the feta sauce to your mouth. lol.
 
Risus
#3
I barbecue lamb chops with lemon/herb seasoning. Comes out great.
 
AnnaG
#4
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 2 tbs mint jelly
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 10 large mushrooms, cut in half
  • 2 green onions, minced
  • cubed lamb chunks
  • 1/2 pound sliced thick cut bacon, cut in half
  • red bell peppers
  • skewers
Marinate for 1 hour in the fridge the lamb and mushrooms in a bowl with the soy sauce, cider vinegar, mint jelly, canola oil, and green onions.
Preheat grill or BBQ or whatever to a high heat.
Wrap the lamb with the bacon and skewer, then alternate with red pepper chunks, then mushrooms.
While cooking, keep brushing the kabobs with the marinate mix until the bacon is crisp.
Bon apetit!
 
gopher
+1
#5  Top Rated Post
I have not had lamb for quite a while and will have to partake of it, soon. Thanks for the inspiration.

 
AnnaG
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 2 tbs mint jelly
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 10 large mushrooms, cut in half
  • 2 green onions, minced
  • cubed lamb chunks
  • 1/2 pound sliced thick cut bacon, cut in half
  • red bell peppers
  • skewers
Marinate for 1 hour in the fridge the lamb and mushrooms in a bowl with the soy sauce, cider vinegar, mint jelly, canola oil, and green onions.
Preheat grill or BBQ or whatever to a high heat.
Wrap the lamb with the bacon and skewer, then alternate with red pepper chunks, then mushrooms.
While cooking, keep brushing the kabobs with the marinate mix until the bacon is crisp.
Bon apetit!

Oh, yeah, a title. They are shish kebabs.
 
gopher
+1
#7
Great recipe, Anna!

Since I'm greatly into spices, I would add a combo of crushed garlic & peppercorn and ginger into the vinegar-soy mixture.

Yum, yum!!
Last edited by #juan; Feb 4th, 2013 at 11:19 PM..
 
AnnaG
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Great recipe, Anna!

Since I'm greatly in spices, I would add a combo of crushed garlic & peppercorn and ginger into the vinegar-soy mixture.

Yum, yum!!

Thanks.
If you do that, though, don't add the mint jelly. Somehow a garlic/ginger/mint mix doesn't sound too appetizing. Might try honey instead?
 
gerryh
#9
The only time I buy lamb is if it's fresh, the frozen crap is from new zealand and we have enough farmers raising lamb in Canada that I refuse to support farmers living across the ocean.
 
AnnaG
#10
Good for you, Gerry. Local is best.
 
gerryh
#11
for a while, Jenn didn't like me shopping at safeway with her as I would question the meat and produce people as to where everything came from. I especially hate the produce marked "product of Canada/U.S." which is it? I would recieve looks that said "what the hell does it matter?" The same with frozen Coho, I asked where it was from and they said, "the Pacific", I said what country... they said Alaska, I told em I didn't want it then, only Canadian caught Salmon thank you.
 
VanIsle
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

for a while, Jenn didn't like me shopping at safeway with her as I would question the meat and produce people as to where everything came from. I especially hate the produce marked "product of Canada/U.S." which is it? I would recieve looks that said "what the hell does it matter?" The same with frozen Coho, I asked where it was from and they said, "the Pacific", I said what country... they said Alaska, I told em I didn't want it then, only Canadian caught Salmon thank you.

Good for you. Produce marked in such a manner means they have mixed the fruit from the two countries so you have to go through and read those tiny little labels. So far I have not seen mixed Delicious Apples (red) - just those marked with a grown in BC label. Gala's show both countries. Not much problem with our fish here and where it comes from. I'm not into Super Store meat. According to their meat dept. workers (they don't seem to be called Butcher's anymore)all the fish they sell is farm fish. For the most part, I just don't shop there anyway.
For anyone near a SOM store in BC - last day tomorrow (Sat.) for Roast Beef at $2.00 a pound. I cooked a roast for dinner tonight - nice slow cooking as it is of course a cheaper cut of meat but it was lovely and tender meat. Hubby was so impressed he came to the store tonight and bought 3 more. You are getting a 6 pound roast for $12.00.
 
#juan
#13
Quote:

quote
Not much problem with our fish here and where it comes from. I'm not into Super Store meat. According to their meat dept. workers (they don't seem to be called Butcher's anymore)all the fish they sell is farm fish. For the most part, I just don't shop there anyway.

We do most of our grocery shopping at SOM, but the Superstore's fish are definitely not all farm fish. I don't buy Atlantic salmon period. Their selection of fish is better than any store I know of. The Superstore sells Red Snapper fillets that are second to none, very well boned and trimmed. The pink salmon at Superstore are like SOM, mainly whole, frozen fish. Sockeye, Coho, and Spring are for special events at our house because of the price.
 
winniethepooh
#14
I love lamb, don't get it too often because of the price, but when I do I prefer the small loin chops, bbq'd and just served with lots of mint sauce. I did try mixing some of the thick mint sauce with redcurrant jelly, melt it together, then brush it on the chops - delicious.
 
YukonJack
#15
For the VERY, VERY best lamb dishes, go and visit Penelope's Restaurant, across the St. Lawrence Center in Toronto.

Getting their recipes? GOOD LUCK!!
 
talloola
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

My family adores lamb... my kids go berserk for it. Their absolute fave is skewered and bbq'd. Typically I just find whatever lamb is affordable, trim and cube it, and dress it with a greek marinade (lemon juice, olive oil, pepper, basil, garlic, salt). Not too strong, as you don't want to totally overpower the meat. Then we serve it with a feta sauce (desired amount of strained balkan yogurt, mix in feta and paprika to taste... I make a fairly thick sauce with lots of feta). Assorted grilled vegetables complete the meal, and help give you more vehicles for getting the feta sauce to your mouth. lol.

Sounds yummy Karrie, because I hate lamb, but all of the extra flavourings you
put on it would taste great, I would eat the sauces/veggies and forget about the lamb.
 
VanIsle
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

We do most of our grocery shopping at SOM, but the Superstore's fish are definitely not all farm fish. I don't buy Atlantic salmon period. Their selection of fish is better than any store I know of. The Superstore sells Red Snapper fillets that are second to none, very well boned and trimmed. The pink salmon at Superstore are like SOM, mainly whole, frozen fish. Sockeye, Coho, and Spring are for special events at our house because of the price.

I don't buy a lot of fish because - I am a Halibut fan and it's both expensive and scarce. I do like Sockeye as well but not near as much. I know the packaging at SS says it is fresh fish but the claim is that it is farm fish. It is nothing I am certain of so I am certainly not prepared to say that I know I am right. SOM has expensive fish so I leave it in the meat dept. We have not had any good buys on Halibut for the past two seasons and it seems ridiculous to me that you and I live in this city and yet we have to pay about $12.00 for a one piece Halibut meal if we eat out. Have to pay pretty close to that even if we buy it and eat in. We camped at Rondalyn last summer and bought some beautiful Sockeye at (I believe) the Country Grocers Store. Most of their prices are pretty steep but that was on a good buy so we bought a whole fish and just froze it in the trailer freezer. Sure could use a good Halibut feed though. I'm used to having a good stock of it in the freezer but we didn't get up Island this year to buy any.
 
AnnaG
#18
A friend of ours has a Greek restaurant and serves a lamb/tomato sauce dish loaded with garlic and oregano that's just superb. I've been trying to remeber the name of it.
 
#juan
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

The only time I buy lamb is if it's fresh, the frozen crap is from new zealand and we have enough farmers raising lamb in Canada that I refuse to support farmers living across the ocean.

Gerry there is nothing wrong with New Zealand lamb. If New Zealand farmers can raise lamb and ship it 12 thousand miles and be competitive, all the more strength to them. I'm pretty sure that lamb producers in New Zealand are operating under at least the same rules regarding health and product safety as we are. Can we ship lamb to New Zealand and be competitive? I doubt it.
 
karrie
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Gerry there is nothing wrong with New Zealand lamb.

There's also nothing wrong with choosing to support local farmers for economic and environmental reasons.
 
#juan
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

There's also nothing wrong with choosing to support local farmers for economic and environmental reasons.

While I don't know what the "environmental reasons" might be, I certainly support local Farmers where I can. You would think shipping costs would knock the New Zealand product right out of the market but it doesn't. Every Spring I buy at least one whole lamb, cut and wrapped, from a local farmer so I know the local farmers can be competitive. I support our farmers but I'm damned if I'll subsidise them. I leave that to our government....
 
karrie
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

While I don't know what the "environmental reasons" might be, I certainly support local Farmers where I can. You would think shipping costs would knock the New Zealand product right out of the market but it doesn't. Every Spring I buy at least one whole lamb, cut and wrapped, from a local farmer so I know the local farmers can be competitive. I support our farmers but I'm damned if I'll subsidise them. I leave that to our government....

environmentally speaking, buying something from across the world that requires shipping and refrigeration, is irresponsible if the exact same thing is available next door minus international shipping.
 
#juan
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

environmentally speaking, buying something from across the world that requires shipping and refrigeration, is irresponsible if the exact same thing is available next door minus international shipping.

Refrigeration in this day and age is not the risk it maybe once was. Many products are frozen for months before they get to the consumer. All meat products require refrigeration at some point. It is probably irresponsible to pay unnecessarily high prices when you don't have to.
 
karrie
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Refrigeration in this day and age is not the risk it maybe once was. Many products are frozen for months before they get to the consumer. All meat products require refrigeration at some point. It is probably irresponsible to pay unnecessarily high prices when you don't have to.

I said environmentally... shipping uses energy, plain and simple, especially when it's refrigerated shipping. The other issues you point to are something else.
 
gerryh
#25
of course, it's so much more responsible to support the economy and growers of a foriegn country rather than your own.
 
#juan
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

of course, it's so much more responsible to support the economy and growers of a foriegn country rather than your own.

Gerry you know I didn't say that.

B.C. grows a hell of a pile of apples but we import apples from both New Zealand, Australia, and the U.S. Why? Who knows? I don't buy them.

I buy all of the meat for our table and I am price conscious. Why should I buy frozen lamb from Canada at a much higher price than frozen New Zealand lamb. If the price is not a factor I buy the best quality. At equal or close to equal price and quality, I buy Canadian.
 
Albertabound
#27
You have to try this. Cut the lamb into 2 inch cubes. Dice 5 medium onions. Salt and pepper the lamb cubes. Don't be shy with the salt. Put the lamb and onions in layers in a sealable container adding salt and pepper to the onions, once again don't be shy with the salt. Store in the fridge for 3 days (the salt is a preservative, that's why you don't want to be shy with it) bbq it as you normally would. You will not believe the taste. Russian Shisliki
 
gerryh
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post


I buy all of the meat for our table and I am price conscious. Why should I buy frozen lamb from Canada at a much higher price than frozen New Zealand lamb. If the price is not a factor I buy the best quality. At equal or close to equal price and quality, I buy Canadian.


Why? To support Canadian growers and suppliers. That's why.
 
#juan
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

Why? To support Canadian growers and suppliers. That's why.

I support them as I said, but they have to be competitive.
 
talloola
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

I support them as I said, but they have to be competitive.

That's right juan, I'm glad I don't really like lamb much, because when I see it,
fresh in the supermarket, the price blows me away, I can't afford those steep
costs, and the frozen lamb from new zealand is cheaper. I don't buy either
one, but if I did, I would be trying the less expensive one, unless I could find
the fresh local product on sale, and, as you say, a whole one from a local farmer, which is probably a bit of a saving.
I will always support our local growers, but there is a limit, and common sense
should apply.
 

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