Gerald Stanley Not Guilty


petros
+4
#631
That shit recently got one person here tossed.
 
Danbones
-1
#632
So palistine where the actual semites is is for the zionists who are not semites...i though palistien never existed.
OO
lol, Not much point in hanging in clown land with you gretas.

You genocidal racist retards deserve your own forum.

Seven counties in seven years...


see ya round sleeperz...ya coward.
 
petros
+3
#633
It's the repetition. He heard it the first time. That's what bothers people.
 
JLM
#634
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That shit recently got one person here tossed.


MHz?
 
DaSleeper
+2
#635
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

MHz?

Naaah I think he mean turning every thread into his pet anti jew fixation!
The thread is about stanley , not the muddled east!
 
Girth
#636
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

So palistine where the actual semites is is for the zionists who are not semites...i though palistien never existed.
OO
lol, Not much point in hanging in clown land with you gretas.
You genocidal racist retards deserve your own forum.
Seven counties in seven years...
see ya round sleeperz...ya coward.

The mentally ill, one-trick pony is back.

Dan always derails threads with his bizarre antisemitic posts.

Dan, can you please go away? Nobody understands your garbage posts anyway.
Last edited by Girth; Jan 17th, 2020 at 02:18 PM..
 
Twin_Moose
+3
#637
Colten Boushie’s family calls for justice on Stanley acquittal anniversary

Quote:

Two years to the day that Gerald Stanley was acquitted of the murder of Colten Boushie, the family of the dead Indigenous man are again calling for reforms to the Canadian justice system.
“The colonial courts were created without Indigenous input and continue to oppress Indigenous people,” said Jade Tootoosis, Boushie’s cousin.
“We want to be heard but most of all, we should be included.”
Tootoosis, Boushie’s mother Debbie Baptiste and the family lawyer Eleanore Sunchild hosted a screening of "nipawistamasowin: We Will Stand Up," a documentary that portrays the events of the night of Aug. 9, 2016, when Boushie, a Cree man from Red Pheasant First Nation, and four other people entered onto Stanley’s property.
Stanley shot Boushie in the head and killed him. The film then follows the second-degree murder trial of the Saskatchewan farmer, a white man, and his acquittal by a jury that did not include any Indigenous people.
The film won awards from prominent film festivals in North America and has already been shown across the country.
Baptiste has seen it several times and spoken publicly about Boushie’s death in the past. She says it never gets easier.
“For me, it’s not a healing process,” she told Global News ahead of the screening in North Battleford.
“It’s opening my wounds over and over again. But then I go through it because I have to. We have to get the word out there.”
Baptiste said she’s been angry and in pain since Boushie died, and that those emotions were especially powerful on the anniversary of the acquittal.
Boushie’s death and Stanley’s trial garnered national headlines and prompted debate about reforms to the Canadian legal system.
The effect that peremptory challenges -- the ability for lawyers to dismiss potential jurors without providing a reason -- can have on the ethnic makeup of a jury prominently featured in articles and debates.
The federal government introduced legislation to ban the challenges but an Ontario judge has since struck down the ban and similar decisions in other provinces are expected.
Sunchild said the injustice wasn’t limited to jury selection and included how the family was told about Boushie’s death, among other things.
She said a jury with several Indigenous members may have produced a different verdict or would have appeared to have no bias. But she also said focusing on just a single aspect of the case misses the bigger picture.
“You start with looking at Colten as a human being. You start by recognizing the fact that Indigenous people need justice too,” she told Global News.
She said the film provided an insight into how the family was treated.
All three people said a royal commission or a United Nations investigation into how the justice system treats Indigenous people is needed. All said the matter is an issue of reconciliation.
Baptiste said she’ll keep working towards making reforms to the justice system and that she won’t be discouraged by the lack of progress she’s experienced so far.
“We’re all human beings and something will change. That’s the hope we got,” she said.

I have 2 thoughts here

1) How come they have no outrage over the 100's of indigenous persons selected for jury duty that didn't show up?
2) How much did Trudeau pay them with his tear filled apology and change to the system that is now seeing many retrials of convicted fellons
 
petros
+2
#638
A circle would have came to the same not guilty verdict.
 
Girth
+6
#639
No wonder Bousie was a criminal. His family are in denial, and playing the race card to make excuses for their son's poor behavior.
 
petros
+5
#640
Thug life.
 
captain morgan
+7
#641
How sad that these 'family members' aren't capable of understanding personal responsibility
 
Mowich
+6
#642
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

No wonder Bousie was a criminal.

Aided and abetted by the kid's grandmother who was present but hardly accountable when the group began drinking whiskey at her house........then the same unaccountable grandmother let them go for a drunken joy ride.

Where were all these caring people before the incident happened. Colten came from a family rife with criminals as numerous police reports have detailed over the years. By turning a blind eye to the fact that Colten had been in trouble before and was desperately in need of someone to show him the error of his ways, the community which includes Tootoosis bears at least partial responsibility for his ill-fated journey down that dirt road. It is all well and good to for them to blame Canadians and Canadian governments but in doing so it would behoove them to acknowledge their role in this tragedy.
 
Twin_Moose
+4
#643
But, but he was a good boy, never in trouble, chopped wood for the elders, helped everyone in the community, everybody that new him loved him. /smh
 
Girth
+1
#644
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Aided and abetted by the kid's grandmother who was present but hardly accountable when the group began drinking whiskey at her house........then the same unaccountable grandmother let them go for a drunken joy ride.

It's all the White Man's fault. Don't you understand that we committed cultural genocide against them.
 
Mowich
+3
#645
Legal reforms after Gerald Stanley case causing confusion

Vague wording in a bill, which made significant changes to Canada’s legal system after the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, has resulted in confusion in courtrooms across the country.

A recent Ontario court ruling could result in dozens of serious criminal cases needing re-trials and a legal expert says it’s not clear how the new law will be consistently applied in Saskatchewan just yet.

“The indecision came about,” said Bill Roe, who practiced criminal law for almost 40 years, “because… parliament did not make it clear whether or not this would apply to pending charges.”

On Sept. 19, 2019, Bill C-75 received royal assent. The legislation banned peremptory challenges — the ability of lawyers to veto potential jurors without providing a reason.

A decision made in January by the Ontario Court of Appeal determined that the abolishment of peremptory rights should not apply to cases where charges were already laid before the bill became law — meaning that the challenges can’t be used in Ontario for cases with charges laid after Sept. 20.

Roe, a sessional lecturer at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, said only one case has dealt with the issue in Saskatchewan and that the case isn’t binding upon other judges.

“Brother [and sister] judges could disagree with the judge, with Justice Danyliuk’s decision. They could reach their own conclusion and run a jury trial without peremptory challenges,” he said, referring to the R v Dorian case, which took place in October 2019.

Justice R.W. Danyliuk ruled, according to court documents, that peremptory challenges could be used in that jury trial because the charges in Bill C-75 were not retrospectively applicable.

Roe said other judges could look to Danyliuk’s decision but were not restricted by it, meaning they, in theory, could rule that peremptory challenges should not be used in jury selections for ongoing cases for which the charges were laid before Sept. 19.

Saskatchewan is among several provinces tackling the issue. Roe said that different rulings in different provinces likely mean the issue will require the Supreme Court of Canada to make the ultimate determination.

The bill places responsibility for jury selection with the presiding judge, who will ask questions from the respective counsels but leaving inclusion or dismissal up to their discretion.

A Saskatchewan law court spokesperson said she couldn’t “pull together” a number of how many cases were ongoing on Sept. 19, 2019, which could end up as jury trials, given that it would include new arrests from that day and ongoing cases.

A spokesperson for Saskatchewan Justice Minister Don Morgan said the minister was unable to comment on “how a hypothetical case may affect future legislation or justice system processes.”

Peremptory challenges received national attention during the trial of Gerald Stanley, a white man who was acquitted on Feb. 9, 2018, of the killing of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous man, by a jury in Battleford, Sask., with no visibly Indigenous members. Boushie’s family, at the time, said the vetoes were used to ensure that was the case.

Roe said he didn’t know if the new legislation will make jurors and jury selection less prone to biases and that Canadians would have to “wait and see” if the removal of the challenges was a good idea.

“What we want for the accused is a fair trial, that’s, that’s the cornerstone of the Canadian… system of justice.”

www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/legal-reforms-after-gerald-stanley-case-causing-confusion
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#646
Here is an example of how the media promotes articles 1 law student opinion leads to a growing concern. Really?

Calls grow for public inquiry into death of Colten Boushie, acquittal of Gerald Stanley

Quote:

Andre Bear wants justice for Colten Boushie.
Bear, a law student at the University of Saskatchewan and a board member of the Indigenous Bar Association, is calling on the provincial government to hold a public inquiry into the death of Boushie and the acquittal of Gerald Stanley.
“What we need to do,” he told Global News, “is identify the issues and the errors of law, especially when it’s not working for Indigenous Peoples in this province
He said an inquiry into the death of Boushie “needs to happen and is the most serious since the starlight tours and the death of Neil Stonechild.”...…...More

I wonder if he would like to lead the inquiry for his thesis?
 
JLM
+2
#647
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Here is an example of how the media promotes articles 1 law student opinion leads to a growing concern. Really?

Calls grow for public inquiry into death of Colten Boushie, acquittal of Gerald Stanley



I wonder if he would like to lead the inquiry for his thesis?


I think the answer to this is simple...…………...When you enter another person's property, uninvited in a drunken state and act like an idiot you are the one responsible when things go "south"!
 
Mowich
+2
#648
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

It's all the White Man's fault. Don't you understand that we committed cultural genocide against them.

Bullshit. The family is responsible for not stepping in when the kid started showing criminal tendencies. But then, as a good portion of them were criminals themselves that was not about to happen. Funny how they talk about 'cultural genocide' when Canadians witness their ceremonies, ceremonial garb, dances, smudging, chants, drum beating and feather waving every time they show up at a protest or blockade. I have attended a couple of Pow Wows at our local reserve - no lack of culture there.


Red Pheasant: Reserve Life is not Healthy, Especially for Young People

Red Pheasant Cree Nation No. 108 is located in Saskatchewan near North Battleford. The band is named after Red Pheasant, brother of Chief Wuttunee (Porcupine). Wuttunee was chief, in 1876, when Red Pheasant was a signatory to Treaty No. 6. Wuttunee did not wish to sign the treaty, so he delegated the task to his brother.

Not enough is known as to why Chief Wuttunee did not want to sign the treaty. Perhaps his reasons were similar to those expressed a century later by another Wuttunee – William – whose life is discussed below.

Today, only a third of the band’s approximately 1890 members actually reside on the reserve; two-thirds have chosen to live elsewhere. There are reasons for this.

This essay will discuss three Indigenous Canadians, all of whom have – or had – roots in Red Pheasant. Two lived off the reserve, maintained productive lives and contributed leadership to their people, and to Canada; one languished on the reserve and died violently at the age of 22.

William (Bill) Wuttunee

There are many, many Wuttunees in Saskatchewan and Alberta, and it is difficult for those of us not close to his family to establish the genealogy of William Wuttunee, born in 1928. However, it might be fair to assume Chief Wuttunee and Red Pheasant were among William’s ancestral relatives.

William Wuttunee attended the Indian residential school at Onion Lake, Saskatchewan until the school burned down in 1943. Later in his life he testified about the wrongdoings he witnessed at the school and assisted other former students with their healing. He completed high school in Battleford, Saskatchewan, achieved a McGill scholarship (rare for anyone in those days, especially an Indigenous student), and earned a law degree from the University of Saskatchewan. Western Canada’s first Indigenous lawyer, he practiced law in Calgary and Northwest Territories, and was a founder of what is now the Assembly of First Nations. Some years later he was delighted to exclaim that there were then some two thousand Indigenous Canadian lawyers!

Wuttunee dedicated much of his life to improving the lives of Indigenous people. In 1971, he wrote a controversial book, Ruffled Feathers, in which he pressed for an end to the apartheid system – still operating in Canada today – through the implementation of the White Paper on Indian Policy (1970). As a result of his advocacy for Indigenous equality with other Canadians, he was barred from Red Pheasant Reserve and twelve other reserves. Unruffled (excuse the pun), William continued his work for the freedom of Indigenous Canadians until his death in 2015.

Aside from his work on indigenous issues, among Wuttunee’s many other important achievements was the part he played in bringing to an end the criminalization of homosexuality in Canada.

Robert-Falcon Ouellette

Robert-Falcon Ouellette was elected to the House of Commons in 2015 to represent the people of Winnipeg Centre. He is the son of a Cree/Metis father from Red Pheasant Reserve and an English mother. His father attended an Indian residential school and later, reportedly, became an alcoholic, sometimes-absent parent. Robert endured hardship and poverty in his young life and experienced homelessness one summer in Winnipeg, but moved on to succeed in acquiring a good education. He studied at the Universities of Calgary and Laval, achieving a PhD in anthropology. He served for 19 years in the Royal Canadian Navy and was later appointed director of Aboriginal Focus Programs at the University of Manitoba prior to his election as a Member of Parliament.

Colten Boushie

Colten Boushie lived on the Red Pheasant Reserve when, at the age of 22, he was shot and killed on August 9, 2016 while engaged with his friends in a drunken rural home invasion after a day of swimming, drinking and shooting. Prior to his death, he spent his days occasionally cutting wood, asking friends for gas money and waiting for “welly day”. His Facebook entries in the months preceding his tragic death reveal a life of boring, mostly unemployed melancholy on the reserve. For example: “Well not going anywhere for now stuck in this s- – – hole we call life … Bored as s- – -.”

Boushie’s posts demonstrate how this kind of life can, and often does, lead young people to thoughts of criminality. He wrote, “Back in the saddle again throw my middle finger up to the law ain’t gotta rob nobody tonight but I do it just because I’m a nut I get bored did some pills but I want more f- – – this world f- – – this town.”

On the first-year anniversary of the acquittal of the farmer who shot him, Boushie’s mother said, “After all this, we still miss him, still love him.” Coming from the mother of a young man meeting such a dreadful end, comments like these are to be expected, and should be accorded respect. Yet, Boushie’s Facebook entry for February 29, 2016 noted, “My family may hate me but in my absence for eternity they’ll say they loved me … Think about it.”

The 2018 acquittal of farmer Gerald Stanley dominated news headlines. Colten’s family members, Indigenous leaders, the Prime Minister and his ministers, current NDP leader, journalists and others commented disapprovingly on the verdict, leading still others to accuse the politicians of interfering with the administration of justice. Then justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould was accused of bias – a serious charge, given her special responsibility as attorney general.

One member of parliament who received public attention – and Indigenous denunciation – was the above-referenced Robert-Falcon Ouellette, who said, “I’m really sorry for the Boushie family. But I’m also sorry for the Stanley family … The Stanley family, and many farmers in Saskatchewan, have the feeling that their property is not respected and people come on to their farms and steal their stuff. They’ve essentially lost two years of their lives. They’ve faced legal bills and great difficulty.”

William Wuttunee passed away unaware of the miserable life of Colten Boushie, and prior to his violent death. Given Wuttunee’s thoughts about Indigenous life as set out in Ruffled Feathers, the perspective he would have had on this sad story might not have surprised anyone. Yet, if his advice about our apartheid system had been followed when he gave it fifty years ago, the tragedy might never have happened. Colten Boushie could have benefited from a better education, meaningful employment, happiness and no interest whatever in criminal activity.

Three people with Red Pheasant backgrounds. Three stories. One inescapable conclusion: reserve life is not healthy, especially for young people.

It is still not too late to do the right thing for future generations.

fcpp.org/2019/10/04/red-pheasant-reserve-life-is-not-healthy-especially-for-young-people/
 
Twin_Moose
#649
I didn't watch the movie, was any of Colten's real child hood mentioned in the highly acclaimed film?
 

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