Engine Giant Cummins Launched Its Electric Semi Ahead of Tesla


B00Mer
#1
Engine Giant Cummins Launched Its Electric Semi Ahead of Tesla

BEAT THEM TO IT?

Ahead of Tesla’s planned September launch of its highly-anticipated electric semi truck, American engine designer and manufacturer Cummins unveiled an electric concept truck. Dubbed the AEOS, the all-electric semi is part of the company’s efforts to develop environmentally-friendly technologies.

“These new technological innovations build on our 100-year legacy of bringing the best solutions to our customers, driving their success and meeting the evolving demands of their industries and markets,” Cummins CTO Jennifer Rumsey said at the event on Tuesday at the company’s Technical Center in Columbus, Indiana.



The AEOS promises an assemblage of energy-saving features, beginning with an electric powertrain to match its 140 KWh battery pack. With a range of 161 kilometers (100 miles) on a single charge, which additional battery packs could extend to 483 kilometers (300 miles), the AEOS can haul about 22 tons (44,000 pounds) of cargo. It’s trailer roof can also be retrofitted with solar panels, adding an extra clean energy punch.

THE TRUCKS WE WANT

While the AEOS is remarkable as it is, it might not be much of a competition for Tesla’s upcoming electric semi. For starters, the range doesn’t match Tesla’s, which is presumably capable of reaching 321-483 kilometers (200-300 miles) on a single charge. While both don’t yet match the 1610-kilometer (1000-mile) range of traditional semis, Tesla can certainly deliver more than the AEOS — the latter can work perfectly well for inner-city deliveries.

Then there’s the rumors about “platooning.” Supposedly, Tesla’s electric semi is meant to work as part of an autonomous fleet of electric trucks trailing one lead vehicle. As for how much cargo one Tesla semi can haul, there are no reports that hint on that yet.

[youtube]Ag279KjPKDQ[/youtube]

Electric vehicles are beginning to dominate roads, beginning with passenger vehicles and now with delivery trucks. The goal is to have fully-electric (and ideally autonomous) trucks that can cover long-haul deliveries. Delivery trucks running on fossil fuels contribute about 23 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. So, with both Tesla and Cummins offering cleaner alternatives, it isn’t really a competition. It all boils down to how much both can help make roads greener.

https://futurism.com/engine-giant-cu...head-of-tesla/

I'll take 10 trucks please..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
... an 'lectric semeye?

Sounds un-Merican ta me
 
tay
#3
Other companies have electric trucks already so a paid press release by this Cummins is not impressive. And are they autonomous? That's the big selling feature. Tesla and others have the benefit of not needing drivers which will outsell a simply electric vehicle.


Orange EV, a Kansas City startup, has introduced a line of heavy-duty all-electric T-Series terminal trucks, also known as spotters or yard mules, which are used at ports, railyards and cargo depots to move containers.
  1. Orange EV is an all-electric terminal truck startup manufactured in Riverside, Mo. Wayne Mathisen is the chief executive.
  2. Orange EV launched its first all-electric terminal truck in 2014.
  3. Orange EV T-Series trucks are powered by lithium ion battery packs of 80 to 160 kilowatt hours.
  4. Orange EV vehicles can travel up to 100 miles between charges.
  5. Orange EV’s new electric truck price ranges from $244,950 to $284,950 for a new vehicle and $199,950 to $239,950 for a re-manufactured variant using recycled cabs and frames from older trucks. The vehicles typically qualify for environmental subsidies in California and other stats.The price of Orange EV’s electric truck ranges
https://www.trucks.com/2016/11/23/or...lectric-truck/


The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union representing 1.4 million members, is fighting tooth-and-nail against the legal implementation of autonomous trucks in the US. Last week it successfully lobbied Congress to place a 10,000 pound weight-limit on current driverless vehicle legislation.
The legislation represents a rare example of bipartisanship under the current administration; it passed with a vote of 54-0. It also paves the way for cars without drivers to occupy our roads. The new bill will limit US States’ power over self-driving car regulation, require the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to draft legislation specific to autonomous vehicles, and provide exemptions allowing companies to put unmanned fleets onto roads ahead of full-scale safety regulations.


It seems like the only thing keeping human drivers in the trucking business right now is politics, and the Teamsters are pulling out all of the stops to protect union members. On the Teamsters website you’ll find links to studies stating most people are reluctant to embrace driverless cars –this is in contradiction to others, which claim the opposite . The Teamsters also speculate robots will cause hazardous waste problems if human truckers are replaced.


https://thenextweb.com/artificial-in...erless-trucks/
 
Danbones
#4
Quote:

Orange EV T-Series trucks are powered by lithium ion battery packs

Lithium and opium, thank gawd for Afghanistan and illegal invasions eh?

Only certain driving situation suit driverless..
but you'll know we are on trouble if they start with the driverless bicycles
Last edited by Danbones; Aug 31st, 2017 at 05:05 AM..
 
Angstrom
#5
Tesla is a retard.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Angstrom View Post

Tesla is a retard.

Angstrom is a retard.
 
Nanoose
#7
Thats a sharp looking truck. 20 years ago if some one told told me Cummins would be making an electric semi I would of laughed at them. The solar panels on the roof are a nice feature maybe they will start putting solar panels on the roof of the trailer to. Cheers!
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Nanoose View Post

Thats a sharp looking truck. 20 years ago if some one told told me Cummins would be making an electric semi I would of laughed at them. The solar panels on the roof are a nice feature maybe they will start putting solar panels on the roof of the trailer to. Cheers!

DC electric motors are actually simpler to produce than engines. There are fewer components, notably moving parts. Storing those electrons is the only issue.
 
tay
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

DC electric motors are actually simpler to produce than engines. There are fewer components, notably moving parts. Storing those electrons is the only issue.

As Tesla and Edison realized a long time ago......

When Edison Lit Up Manhattan


PBS show

http://qrznow.com/nicola-tesla-will-


A new self-driving truck start-up has entered the field. After unveiling their autonomous truck to the world last week, Embark is now being billed as a classic Silicon Valley upstart story – in part because its two co-founders are only 21 years old.

Embark is taking a similar approach to Otto, offering a kit to retrofit existing trucks with self-driving capabilities. Their system uses a combination of cameras, radar, and LiDAR to “see” the world around it. According to cleantechnica , Embark’s CEO and co-founder, Alex Rodrigues claims that, “the millions of data points from these sensors are processed using a form of Artificial Intelligence known as Deep Neural Nets (or DNNs) that allow the truck to learn from its own experience.”

Through past experience, that AI system has now “learned” how to see through glare, fog, and darkness. It also helps address a chief concern of autonomous-driving critics: Embark’s AI has learned, and will continue to learn, how to safely handle itself in unusual and unforeseen situations.

We’ve programmed them with a set of rules to help safely navigate most situations, how to safely learn from the unexpected, and how to apply that experience to new situations going forward,” says Rodrigues.



Embark’s trucks have accomplished this with only about 10,000 miles of testing. That doesn’t sound like many miles until you consider that the company first received its test license from the State of Nevada in late January.

Just two years ago, Rodrigues was building a self-driving golf cart in his parents’ garage with only $10,000. Inspiration to start working on self-driving technology for trucks struck him when he was stranded on a highway for four hours with a blown tire. As he sat watching the traffic go by, he noticed that almost every truck had a ‘now hiring’ sticker on the back.

Doing research on the subject, he discovered what truckers already know – turnover is high, pay is low, and home time is scarce. So Rodrigues decided to look for a way that freight would be able to move across the country, while drivers would be able to sleep in their own beds every night.

His solution was self-driving technology that allows for autonomous driving on highways. Drivers would get in the trucks at local terminals, deliver their loads, and then send the trucks back on their way.

Highway driving is much easier to automate safely than driving on smaller streets or in populated areas. In fact, commercial loads are already being shipped using autonomous technology on highways.

“We are committed to proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that this technology is safe and reliable,” says Rodrigues. “That means performing extensive tests and working with our partners in the government to get it—and the market—ready.”

As for when the kits will be available for purchase, there’s no word yet. Rodrigues says that the company expects that it will cost less than $50,000 to outfit one of their kits onto an existing truck.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/n...nder/98313844/


Embark Self-Driving Semi Truck


www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIbf17-KRDM
 
taxslave
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Engine Giant Cummins Launched Its Electric Semi Ahead of Tesla

BEAT THEM TO IT?

Ahead of Tesla’s planned September launch of its highly-anticipated electric semi truck, American engine designer and manufacturer Cummins unveiled an electric concept truck. Dubbed the AEOS, the all-electric semi is part of the company’s efforts to develop environmentally-friendly technologies.

“These new technological innovations build on our 100-year legacy of bringing the best solutions to our customers, driving their success and meeting the evolving demands of their industries and markets,” Cummins CTO Jennifer Rumsey said at the event on Tuesday at the company’s Technical Center in Columbus, Indiana.



The AEOS promises an assemblage of energy-saving features, beginning with an electric powertrain to match its 140 KWh battery pack. With a range of 161 kilometers (100 miles) on a single charge, which additional battery packs could extend to 483 kilometers (300 miles), the AEOS can haul about 22 tons (44,000 pounds) of cargo. It’s trailer roof can also be retrofitted with solar panels, adding an extra clean energy punch.

THE TRUCKS WE WANT

While the AEOS is remarkable as it is, it might not be much of a competition for Tesla’s upcoming electric semi. For starters, the range doesn’t match Tesla’s, which is presumably capable of reaching 321-483 kilometers (200-300 miles) on a single charge. While both don’t yet match the 1610-kilometer (1000-mile) range of traditional semis, Tesla can certainly deliver more than the AEOS — the latter can work perfectly well for inner-city deliveries.

Then there’s the rumors about “platooning.” Supposedly, Tesla’s electric semi is meant to work as part of an autonomous fleet of electric trucks trailing one lead vehicle. As for how much cargo one Tesla semi can haul, there are no reports that hint on that yet.

[youtube]Ag279KjPKDQ[/youtube]

Electric vehicles are beginning to dominate roads, beginning with passenger vehicles and now with delivery trucks. The goal is to have fully-electric (and ideally autonomous) trucks that can cover long-haul deliveries. Delivery trucks running on fossil fuels contribute about 23 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. So, with both Tesla and Cummins offering cleaner alternatives, it isn’t really a competition. It all boils down to how much both can help make roads greener.

https://futurism.com/engine-giant-cu...head-of-tesla/

I'll take 10 trucks please..

20 tons isn't much of a payload. Might work for around a yard shuffling trailers.
 
tay
#11
A Chinese startup with powerful backing plans to test a fleet of self-driving trucks in Arizona and Shanghai next year, competing with Uber Technologies Inc.and Alphabet Inc. ’s Waymo in transforming the way goods are delivered.

Haulage is ripe for disruption by automation because the industry faces a growing shortage of drivers and transporting cargo between fixed points is less complicated than city driving, says Chen Mo, 33, co-founder and chief executive officer of Beijing-based Tusimple, which is backed by Sina Corp., operator of China’s biggest microblogging site.

Self-driving trucks could cut logistic costs by 40 percent in the U.S. and 25 percent in China as they can run longer than human-piloted rigs without rest and save at least 10 percent on fuel, Chen said. They could also improve safety, especially in China, where trucks kill about 25,000 people a year, according to the Ministry of Public Security.

It’s natural for us to start the business simultaneously as both countries feature a trucker shortage and huge cargo transportation demand,” Chen said in an interview in his office in Beijing. “China’s trucking industry is costly, inefficient and dangerous” and Tusimple’s technology “can reduce the casualty rate to 25 percent of the current level.”

Tusimple would be ahead of Uber and Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo to start road tests in China, where nine out of ten of the nation’s 30 million truckers are individuals subcontracted by logistics companies. China hauled 33.6 billion tons cargo of last year, compared with 10.4 billion tons in the U.S. The Chinese startup has been testing four trucks in China’s northern port of Caofeidian since July.

Uber’s truck division is focused on developing self-driving technology in U.S., a media representative for the company said in an email. Alphabet and Tesla didn’t respond to requests for comment on Chinese trials.

The Senate commerce committee announced a Sept. 13 hearing to examine autonomous commercial vehicles and how they may fit into the Senate’s self-driving vehicle legislation. House lawmakers passed a wide-ranging bill to speed the introduction of self-driving vehicles, applying only to passenger cars and light trucks.

more

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...cks-to-arizona
 
Bar Sinister
#12
Good, the more competition the better. It is just possible Cummins has read the writing on the wall.
 
tay
#13
Here's one we missed from last October.....


Otto and Budweiser: First Shipment by Self-Driving Truck

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb0Kzb3haK8


Forty years will be passed in a few months since the release of "Convoy" by Sam Peckinpah - one of the few productions that had transferred to the big screen not the content of a book, but that of a song. Bill Fries' same title "Convoy", tells the story about a rebellion of a group of truck drivers crossing the US from the West to the East Coast without stopping at police and national guard controls.


Despite the fact that the song and the film are two digestible products of the new American Country and that of anti-Westerns school in which Sam Peckinpah had specialized, they manage to capture the effects of the first major crisis of the capitalist system after WWII .

Drivers revolt against the new 55-mile speed limit imposed after the 1973 oil crisis when the US was trying to limit fuel consumption.

At the same time, however, in order to increase their paycheck a little bit, the truck drivers start to tear the so-called swindle sheets, the logbooks of the truck in which they were obliged to record the driving hours so as not to exceed the limit imposed by the federal government. Therefore, "Convoy", as a song and as a movie, captures the latest outbursts of the unbridled spontaneity that characterizes American truck drivers as their sector is the first that experiences the crisis of the 1970s.

Paradoxically, the legend of the uncontrollable asphalt cowboy will be maintained over the next decades (as we see in the low quality movie "Over the Top" with Sylvester Stallone), despite the fact that drivers are losing continuous battles against the government, and above all, against the major transport companies.

With the development of computers, companies begin to record not only the driving hours and the speed of the vehicle, but even how often and how much the vehicles are braking and accelerating. Trucks and drivers become the sprockets of a giant 700 billion dollars industry, which transports 70% of the products within the US.

In this chain, however, drivers are the weak link. Their wages (together with the loaders and other supporting jobs around the industry) exceed 75% of the total cost of road transports. Adding to this "flaw" the fact that they need to make stops to rest and sleep, but also that they are often involved in accidents that cost US economy billions of dollars, and you can easily understand why some would want to replace them with robots as soon as possible.

the unbalanced evolution of homo sapiens: Dear truck drivers: capitalism is your real enemy, not robots!
 
TenPenny
+1
#14
Tesla is what is called a 'subsidy entrepreneur'.


Cummins has several years of experience with hybrid power trains in railway locomotives, as well as the existing experience in truck engines. It will be hard for Tesla to make a dent, especially when you consider that they're nowhere near meeting their predictions for car manufacturing numbers.


Tesla is in a dreamworld.
 
MHz
#15
With only a single rear axle it is limited to the size of the load making it unsuitable for anything bit deliveries in cities. What it saves would be best shown in slow stop and go traffic. The trailers also need a small gen-set that can be fired up to charge while on the go. Mexico City should be the test bed.
 
taxslave
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

DC electric motors are actually simpler to produce than engines. There are fewer components, notably moving parts. Storing those electrons is the only issue.

Probably AC motors like Tesla.

Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

Tesla is what is called a 'subsidy entrepreneur'.


Cummins has several years of experience with hybrid power trains in railway locomotives, as well as the existing experience in truck engines. It will be hard for Tesla to make a dent, especially when you consider that they're nowhere near meeting their predictions for car manufacturing numbers.


Tesla is in a dreamworld.

so far Cummins has a major problem keeping their computer controlled diesel engines running. Who is going to trust them with a truck that doesn't have a driver to get it to the curb?
 
tay
#17
Loblaw's Unveils Fully Electric Class 8 Truck


The new semi truck is the first of many, as Loblaw announced a commitment to move its entire trucking fleet to electric vehicles. The trucks utilized by Loblaw are more complex than your average semi, as they utilize onboard hybrid refrigerated trailers that were actually demonstrated with the fully electric BYD truck as part of the unveiling. With Loblaw having such an extensive logistics and energy usage footprint, the move to fully electric vehicles in response to climate change could indicate a shift in company strategy that could result in further developments in the space but time will tell.

“As one of Canada’s largest energy users, given the size and scope of our retail network and supply chain, we know we have a critical role to play in helping Canada reach its carbon reduction targets,” said Rob Wiebe, Executive Vice President, Supply Chain, Loblaw Companies Limited. “We are committed to leading responsibly in this area, working with our partners like BYD for sustainable solutions to help our company, and our country, meet those goals.”

Loblaw has made firm commitments to reducing its carbon footprint 30% by 2030 with a specific commitment to reduce the intensity of transportation emissions to 0.087 gCO2 e/t-km, which are targets they will be held accountable to. It has also made it clear that it is looking to other technologies to reduce emissions across its supply chain, which nowadays often translates to financial savings — which is just good business. More and more, business as usual just isn’t good enough when it comes to energy usage, as there are just too many cleantech solutions out there that can help out a company’s bottom line, so clean technologies are almost required anymore just to stay competitive.

Development of fully electric class 8 trucks specifically have not taken off at the same pace as consumer vehicles, but the renewed competition in the space and the scale being driven by consumer electric vehicles and stationary storage products has driven prices of the lithium batteries that power them down as well.

While Tesla gets most of the press for its well branded and much hyped Gigafactories , Panasonic’s cumulative lithium battery production capacity was 8.5 GWh per year compared to BYD’s 16 GWh per year capacity as of Q1 2017 (Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance ). Not only is that a telling tale of who the big players really are in plug-in vehicles, it shows just how much of a powerhouse BYD is in the new energy space. The same report notes that “demand for batteries from electric buses far outstripped that of other passenger vehicles in 2016,” which just so happens to be one of BYD’s core competencies.

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/06...lectric_truck/
 
taxslave
+4
#18  Top Rated Post
ANyone got an idea how these self driving trucks are going to chain up by themselves?
 
Danbones
#19
So...how do they take the carbon out when the hydro is created?
 
TenPenny
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

So...how do they take the carbon out when the hydro is created?

By definition, 'hydro' is electricity generated by a hydroelectric dam.
 
B00Mer
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

ANyone got an idea how these self driving trucks are going to chain up by themselves?


[youtube]v4PW02S9WQM[/youtube]
 
captain morgan
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

By definition, 'hydro' is electricity generated by a hydroelectric dam.

The cement, steel and generators have lots and lots of carbon
 
B00Mer
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The cement, steel and generators have lots and lots of carbon

Everything is carbon based, including humans.

Carbon is a key component of all known life on Earth. Complex molecules are made up of carbon bonded with other elements, especially oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen.

So what’s you f*cking point Cap.. or you just taking though your ass with FoxNews talking points.
 
captain morgan
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Everything is carbon based, including humans.

Carbon is a key component of all known life on Earth. Complex molecules are made up of carbon bonded with other elements, especially oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen.

So what’s you f*cking point Cap.. or you just taking though your ass with FoxNews talking points.

You're one bright candle, that's for sure, unfortunately not bright enough to understand despite your providing the smoking gun that totally undermines the AGW, errrrr sorry, climate change argument, you can't out 2+2 together
 
B00Mer
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

You're one bright candle, that's for sure, unfortunately not bright enough to understand despite your providing the smoking gun that totally undermines the AGW, errrrr sorry, climate change argument, you can't out 2+2 together

You should be a politician, you just replied with a paragraph and nonsensical BS.. Cap for leader of back wood Red Neck Ontario

Don’t you have something important to do, like ice fishing..
 
captain morgan
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You should be a politician, you just replied with a paragraph and nonsensical BS.. Cap for leader of back wood Red Neck Ontario


Whats it means in the context of our last little back and forth is that the fantasy of green energy (read: carbon free) is entirely impossible without either the building blocks (cement, steel, etc ring a bell?), the people to produce and consume it or the industry/manufacture to come up with the other necessary bits (think copper, lithium, cobalt, etc).

... And hopefully the movement to seperate NW Ont from the rest develops some legs.

those folks will be kicking ass and taking names if they can ever start developing their resources more agressively

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Don’t you have something important to do, like ice fishing..

Not interested since I left Winnipeg... Damn did we have a blast drinking, I mean ice fishing
 
EagleSmack
#27
More COBALT!

 
captain morgan
#28
Eco friendly lithium mines.



... So good for the planet, it's just like giving Mother Gaia a big warm hug
 
TenPenny
#29
Lithium Mine?
 
captain morgan
#30
Correct