B.C. condo language dispute sparks human rights complaint


Machjo
#1
http://www.cbc.ca/be...inese-1.3378013

Of course I reject Andreas Kargut and Harry Grey's arguments.

First, Harry Grey's appeal to Chinese not belonging to Canada's official languages applies only to Government administration and public education and not to the private sector.

Secondly, official bilingualism itself is a relic of the residential school era based on what the B&B Commission termed 'the two founding races' apart from 'the other ethnic groups' to the explicit exclusion of 'the Indians and the Eskimos' in its Book I, General Introduction, Paragraph 21.

Thirdly, his argument that Richmond isn't Beijing or Taiwan doesn't hold water as an argument for providing English translation when we consider that Richmond isn't England either.

The logic of Andreas Kargut's argument that Chinese-only meetings exclude him can just as easily be summed up as "A meeting held in language X excludes those who do not know language X."

That being said, I could agree with a law requiring a strata property to hold meetings in the language of its contracts unless the contracts specify otherwise.

I'm assuming these gentlemen had signed their contracts in English with their contracts never defining the strata property's language policy, and so the meetings that are not held in English should include English interpretation.

If the strata property council intended for the meetings to be held monolingually in Chinese, it should have provided Chinese contracts only or at least specify the property's language policy in the contract.

This has nothing to do with official bilingualism, Beijing, or Taiwan though, and everything to do with the contract.

We might also ask whether the law should explicitly require strata property contracts to to specify property council's linguistic policy.
 
tay
#2
Andreas Kargut and six other residents filed a class-action complaint because they couldn’t participate in a Mandarin-only meeting in the 54-unit complex. They claimed they were being discriminated against by the strata council.

After the parties reached a pre-settlement last year, things appeared as though they would work out, and a handful of meetings were held in English with a Mandarin translator.

But then a resolution that would have ensured every meeting would have an accredited interpreter was voted down by strata members.

Now, Kargut and the other parties to his complaint are waiting for a decision as to whether they can proceed to a hearing at the human rights tribunal over the matter.

In the meantime, Kargut has had enough and on Canada Day, he and his family moved to Vernon in the North Okanagan.

“The human rights case is the greatest contributor to us leaving,” Kargut said. “With all of the discrimination that was happening (it) ruined my good name in Richmond. There was accusations of me being a liar, a crook and a racist.”

more

Richmond man who fought Mandarin-only meetings moves away | Vancouver Sun
 
petros
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
No shock there. Chinese are the most racist on the planet.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

http://www.cbc.ca/be...inese-1.3378013

Of course I reject Andreas Kargut and Harry Grey's arguments.

First, Harry Grey's appeal to Chinese not belonging to Canada's official languages applies only to Government administration and public education and not to the private sector.

Secondly, official bilingualism itself is a relic of the residential school era based on what the B&B Commission termed 'the two founding races' apart from 'the other ethnic groups' to the explicit exclusion of 'the Indians and the Eskimos' in its Book I, General Introduction, Paragraph 21.

Thirdly, his argument that Richmond isn't Beijing or Taiwan doesn't hold water as an argument for providing English translation when we consider that Richmond isn't England either.

The logic of Andreas Kargut's argument that Chinese-only meetings exclude him can just as easily be summed up as "A meeting held in language X excludes those who do not know language X."

That being said, I could agree with a law requiring a strata property to hold meetings in the language of its contracts unless the contracts specify otherwise.

I'm assuming these gentlemen had signed their contracts in English with their contracts never defining the strata property's language policy, and so the meetings that are not held in English should include English interpretation.

If the strata property council intended for the meetings to be held monolingually in Chinese, it should have provided Chinese contracts only or at least specify the property's language policy in the contract.

This has nothing to do with official bilingualism, Beijing, or Taiwan though, and everything to do with the contract.

We might also ask whether the law should explicitly require strata property contracts to to specify property council's linguistic policy.

Are you trying to say that little box that was checked recognizing the Two official languages in Canada is English or French means nothing once you are here? And all meetings can be held in any language one wants, no matter of who is in attendance?
 
petros
#5
meaningless little box...
 
pgs
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Are you trying to say that little box that was checked recognizing the Two official languages in Canada is English or French means nothing once you are here? And all meetings can be held in any language one wants, no matter of who is in attendance?

We are a post national state , don't you know ?